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Da' dude
11th February 2006, 5:28 AM
Sup guys. I thought I'd start a little section here to help ya'll out, so I suggested it to Dragonfree, and he thought it was a good idea, so I started it up.

K, here's how it works, if you guys have any tips for fics for specific genres, post them here. Like let's say a person wants some tips on how to make a horror more horrifying, make a comedy funnier, or how to make a romance more romantic, well, if anyone has any tips, post em here.

Your tips can fit under these categories (down here I'll put a list of tutors):

Trainer
Negrek
Dilasc

Action
Ledian X

Adventure
Ledian X

Fantasy
Timid Kyogre
La Carlotta

Horror
Monk76

Comedy
FlamingRuby

Romance
Nylf
Ledian X

Drama

Poetry
Monk76

Mystery

Suspense

Sci Fi
Ledian X

Fan Made
Dilasc
Nylf

Comic style
Ledian X

Characters...

Da' dude
11th February 2006, 7:06 PM
hmm, wonder why no one's showin up. There's over 30 views, but 0 replies...whatever...hope this thread can be used for something useful...;munchlax;

PDL
11th February 2006, 7:11 PM
hmm, wonder why no one's showin up. There's over 30 views, but 0 replies...whatever...hope this thread can be used for something useful...;munchlax;

just be patient, they'll come...

Da' dude
11th February 2006, 7:21 PM
just be patient, they'll come...
You're right...at least you posted, even though it really wasn't an "official" post.

FlamingRuby
11th February 2006, 8:06 PM
I have a tip for comedy fics-

If you need gag ideas, watch cartoons...many classic cartoon gags will work in other universes.

PDL
11th February 2006, 8:20 PM
If you need gag ideas, watch cartoons...many classic cartoon gags will work in other universes.

the only problem is that you shouldn't blatantly borrow stuff from other sources...

if you've written a gag that's been on TV, don't expect it to be as funny as it was on TV...

This goes triple for most of the jokes on Monty Python and the Holy Grail

Da' dude
11th February 2006, 8:31 PM
I have a tip for comedy fics-

If you need gag ideas, watch cartoons...many classic cartoon gags will work in other universes.

thanks, I'll ad your tip

Note: Ughh, I can't edit on this computer, I've got to add you with my dad's computer, so wait until then.

By the way, do you want to be a comedy "tutor", if not, that's cool. PM me when you make up your mind.

Eternal Daydreamer
11th February 2006, 8:32 PM
Weeell, I have a tip for fantasy/adventure fics:

Think big. For Example:

Say you have a wicked witch as a villian. (Cliche but humor me.) Say that this witch wants to steal virgins from the local village. So, you make her as ugly or as beautiful as you want. Give her an evil personality, maybe a crony or two. Then boom, you got your villian.

Another is introduction:

I'm going to use the start of A Lost Fairytale for an example.

I wanted the Controller's introduction to mysterious but not so much that people get lost. Solution? Have them ride into town near dusk on Rapidashes. Make your audiences feel the oddness of a situtation.

I have a few other tips but I'll wait.

Da' dude
11th February 2006, 8:36 PM
Weeell, I have a tip for fantasy/adventure fics:

Think big. For Example:

Say you have a wicked witch as a villian. (Cliche but humor me.) Say that this witch wants to steal virgins from the local village. So, you make her as ugly or as beautiful as you want. Give her an evil personality, maybe a crony or two. Then boom, you got your villian.

Another is introduction:

I'm going to use the start of A Lost Fairytale for an example.

I wanted the Controller's introduction to mysterious but not so much that people get lost. Solution? Have them ride into town near dusk on Rapidashes. Make your audiences feel the oddness of a situtation.

I have a few other tips but I'll wait.

Thank you for contributing with your tips

Note:as said before, I can only edit on my other computer, which I want have access to until tommorow.

Remember you guys, if you really think you'd be good at it and wouldn't mind contributing your time and talent, you can sign up to become a private "tutor". But PM me first.

Nylf
11th February 2006, 9:01 PM
General tip for OT fics.

If you have a huge/epic plot, keep it vague, but hint subtly. Then, when the big twist comes, all the little hints come into place and the reader get's a 'so that's what it was about' feeling. Taking an example from Final Fantasy VII(sorry those who have yet to get far enough), frequently at the start of the game the screen flashes when Cloud tries to remeber his past, before it comes out very cooly and completely perfectly. Then we find out his memeories are false and he created an illusionary past, so the flashes was where he created his past, and you go 'ahh, that explains it'. Or at least think it.

Ledian_X
11th February 2006, 9:09 PM
Taken from my other thread:

Guidelines to Creating Comic Book Style Characters.

1.) Superpowers:

By the early 21st century, basically every superpower you can think of has been used by Marvel, DC, Image, etc. It's important to create a character that isn't a blatant ripoff of said character. If you have a character that can stretch..do not make him a comedian like Plastic Man or a scientific genius like Mr. Fantastic.

You can have similar superpowers but you can't make them too much like someone else who has the same power anywhere in fiction. Even videogames. You can start with something like a fire lady like my character Jenna and build on it. From that, we go to..

2.) Personality/Background:

A superhero nowadays needs to have a rich, multilayered background with a deep personality. You can't have someone with a 2D personality running around saving the day. The person needs to feel, think and act. As a writer, you shout put heart and realisim into the superhero. Regardless if he or she has the ability to fly around or something.

How he or she deals with her powers has an impact on his/her personality. Take Power Shot's Chronos. Chronos is one tough metal guy and he's cold just like metal. Sometimes even tragedy can mould a hero. Spider-Man didn't decide to put on the tights to fight crime the second he was bit by that spider.

It took the death of his Uncle Ben and his irresponsible act that cost his uncle his life to make him the hero he is today.

Backgrounds have to be deep, full of facts and crativity. Nothing watered down. Details need to be used to create an image in the reader's mind. You have to base the guy you're making on reality. Nothing cookie-cutter or Golden Age because that mentality died in 1961 with the birth of the Fantastic Four.

You might say my heroes don't have a history, but they do. I've written the stories since 1996 and wrote detail after detail about every single one of them. Each character has been through a lot and if you read my story, I put parts of each character's history in despite it being the most current story.

Heroes need to have deep histories and be deep. Remember that.

3.) Plot

The plot of the story is important for anything. Not just superheroes. So, if you're like me, you wonder what's the theme of the story you're making? Why do these heroes do what they do? Who tries to stop them? A plot has to be deep.

4.) Bring on the Bad Guys

Ahh the bad guys. These guys and gals need to have deep substance in the. Why do they do what they do? What's got them so hot and bothered when dealing with the heroes? The main villians need to be deep and not corny if they're to be a real threat to the hero.


These are just four of the major guidelines for the story ideas you want to send to me or Power Shot if you want to be a part of this universe. If you have questions, please ask here. Offer any comments too while you're at it. The same thing is expected of would be comic writers as it is for Pokemon writers.

Now as for the other genres listed: *NEW STUFF*

Scifi

1.) Nothing cheesy or cartoony. But, If your story takes place in the future, make sure you actually say "This story takes place in the year 23XX" or something like that. If you use future tech, make sure it isn't really like the Jetsons. If you want to look at possible ways futures can be done, look at: Star Trek (All 5 series and 10 movies), X-Men: Days of Future Past, etc.

2.) If you use time travel, make it believable and realisitc. Same thing with technology you use.

3.) Aliens. Aliens can be good guys or bad guys and if you use space travel, make sure the line's been drawn clear and if you do venture into space, look into stars, constellations and other things about the galaxy. Research is key here. Especially if you want to make an alien world where life eveolved from mammalian/anphibian creatures. You got to make things plausible.

It''d be best to do what Star Trek did. Create some humanoid life for your character to relate to. Some non humanoid life is good too. But in aliens, the possibilities are endless. Same thing applies to biology.

What I did when I created Aquans was look at a frog's anatomy and biological history to find that prehistoric anphibians had gills too as well as a "lung". We call those creatures mudskippers, today. But, they needed something to make them mammalian so they skipped a few rungs on the evolutionary ladder.

4.) Planets. If you create a strange new world remember this: It's up to you to make it as alien as possible. It can have an environment suitable for life to develop. But, don't make it too much like our world. It can be similar with similar animal life forms. But, things can be different. For example, a shark on Aquarius, a world I created has 6 perpendicular finds and a whip like tail. The landscape should be different too. Different colored trees, grass and water. Creating a world that's truly alien but similar to Earth can be tricky but it can be done. Look at several worlds in Star Trek.

Just remember to base some science fiction on real life science. For example, the lays of physics. Cloning is now possible so that's science now. Years ago it was science fiction. Tomorrow's science fiction can always become today's science. Even now, scientists and enginneers are coming close to creating similar gaddgests found in Star Trek.

Action/Adventure:

1.) When creating an action scene remember to put in high drama, fists, lasers, superpowers flying and sometimes even the possibility to the protagonist losing. Sure he'll win but you want to give the reader the perception that he/she might not make it out alive.

2. ) In adventures you always want to describe where they are, where they're going, where they've been and how they got there. Description is key in adventure and a little background would help too. History plays an important role. Background is important when you're on the adventure.


Romance:

1.) Ah Le Amor. There's nothing like writing two characters that love each other deeply. Make sure though that you have given them a romantic history of being together. Their love needs to be explained and felt by the reader. A kiss there, a hug here. Even a love scene if you're so inclined. Nothing too graphic but nice nonetheless.

2.) You need to make the love realistic and sometimes you may want to include love triangles and obstacles both physical and mental. Kevin in my story thought he couldn't get Angela because of his obstacle, ocular implants. Not going to spoil how that ended.

In the end, all of these can be employed in the same story including humor. Romance can also be involved in tense action scenes. Nothing like professing love in the heat of an intense fight.

That's all for now, class.

LX

Da' dude
12th February 2006, 2:42 AM
Keep those tips coming people! As a reminder, I can't update this until Sunday. I still need some tutors to volunteer...I also hope I can get a little help with this thread, because I can't be on all the time...

If you want to be a tutor or want to help out with the thread, PM me.

Keleri
12th February 2006, 3:47 AM
One thing that always irks me in all forms of entertainment are bad villains--specifically, villains that aren't a threat to the hero. To me, this is why a lot of shows with recurring villains are boring--the hero has beaten them a hundred times before, so we don't feel the slightest lick of anxiety about what will happen. Case in point: the pokémon anime. Does anyone worry that Jesse and James are going to actually steal pikachu this time? Well, you know what they say--467th time's the charm... Superhero shows seem to try to avoid this by having a number of different recurring villains, which works for a little while, but after a few episodes it's pretty much the same thing.

I would, therefore, say that it would be good form to have an antagonist, once beaten, either be removed from the story (i.e. they are killed/destroyed or simply leave and disappear), side with the protagonist (this happens a lot in Bleach, I've noticed--a lot of Ichigo's former foes are now his allies) or, if they do absolutely have to come back, be much improved in 'power' (whatever this means for the series you're writing), although I would not suggest that this happen very often.

And even if you do change antagonists fairly regularly, if your villains are bumbling and hilariously incompetent, well... other people may not mind it, but for me it's become an intolerable cliché after years of Saturday morning cartoons and action movies. Villains should be a threat, otherwise there's little point in even besting them. In that same vein, not every villain has to be Satan's Regent on Earth or certifiably insane. For instance, the 'villain' in Mononoke Hime was simply an expanding human town, who saw the destruction of the surrounding forest as a necessary consequence of their growth (I think. It's been a while since I saw it.). Not every conflict is the result of one side being OMGEVIL.

So yeah--for me at least, truly worthy 'villains' (whatever this means for you, whether it's the foe of the minute or Evil Incarnate) make a story really worthwhile. Enemies that are no trouble to beat and/or comical in their ineptitude have no substance, and if your 'fic is filled with them it's the same as putting in some other junky filler.

The Evil Overlord List (http://www.eviloverlord.com/lists/overlord.html) may give you some food for thought vis-ŕ-vis bad-guy clichés to watch out for or mock Terry Pratchett-style, should the mood take you.

Da' dude
12th February 2006, 4:48 AM
Just wanted to make a statement. Welcome to the crew our new Comedy tutor! Give it up for...me!...just kiddin, the real man behind it is....FlamingRuby! Give him a hand folks!

So if you want him to tutor you, just give him a PM!

Ledian_X
12th February 2006, 5:20 AM
FlaminRuby's a lady. And about supervillains..

Don't make them corny at all. Make them a real substantial threat. Jesse, James and Meowth aren't a threat. Not when you consider likes of the Green Goblin, Joker, Lex Luthor, Dr. Doom, Apocalypse and Magneto on a bad day.(Magneto's more an anti-hero now). He's an on again off again baddie. But I digress.


Keleri, all of Team Rocket aren't credible threats. Same with Magma and Aqua. Sure there are serious agents but on the whole their M.O. is silly and too overdone. They want to take over the world. Whoopie do.

If youu want to see comic heroes done right, check out what the Masters of Evil did to the Avengers. They distroyed the mansion, put Hercules in a coma, destroyed what was lft of Captain America's mom (a pic) and more. They caught Earth's mightiest with their pants down. Supervillians and regular villians need to shock the reader with their actions.

When you write villany..Jesse, James and Meowth don't cut it. Bad guys shouldn't be completely removed, though. They can come back but only once in a while. Every comic's villian has come back from time to time. Green Goblin's died and come back. So has Sabretooth and now Apocalypse is back for what? his fifth life?

They come back because they show they're hard to kill and in Apoccy's case he's an essence now. Not a solid being any more. He moves from host to host. There's many reasons why a baddie comes back. You just have to make it credible as to why they return.

I will agree that comical villians like TR are laughable. Can you imagine them vs someone who deals with serious threats? Them and their organization would be gone in days.

LX

Edit: And, I'll help with Action, Adventure, Scifi, Supercharacters

Power Shot
12th February 2006, 5:41 AM
And I'm your guy to go to for suspense. ANYONE who reads my stuff will tell you that I love the suspense part. I hide anything until the last minute, building up such a need to read the next part.

An example: It is now four days after I lasted posted Chapter Eight in After Hoenn. It has had more then 500 hits because of the suspense I generate.

Da' dude
12th February 2006, 5:52 AM
FlaminRuby's a lady.

LX

Edit: And, I'll help with Action, Adventure, Scifi, Supercharacters

My bad...typo...

Dilasc
12th February 2006, 8:57 AM
Fan Made: Grab a cup of Joeseph, this's gonna be a long one.

I suppose I will start with fanmade Pokemon. When making up your own Pokemon, STOP! Think! Think some more! The first and foremost question you want to ask is how you can make your Pokemon unique and interesting, while still being original, yet not going over the top. Yes, you must think carefully. A good start, as I have found, is to build backstories and specie rituals to build upon the characteristics of their abilities. Basically, it's the stuff you'd find in a game version Pokedex.

I'll give you an example through my creations. I may not be the best, but I know I'm not the worst by far, so basically, if you suck at making Pokemon, this stuff's for you.

Example: In Dust to Deceit, there exists a creature made of poisonous, sugary chocolate. Its name is Fudgie, and its typing is poison. By appearance, you're sweet teeth want to sunder it to shreds! Just looking at it, you see the brown chocolate appeal of a brownie, and a sniff of the air brings that fresh baked brownie scent. Even its eyes look good, being made of whipped cream. No, those fangs in its mouth are yummy pieces of orange, candy corn, even if they are sharp fangs that drip of venom and glucose.

Fudgie lives by releasing its aphrodesiac of an aroma. Even amongst sewers, fudgie's scent is very strong. It hides under the camoflauge of its brownie appearance, and waits for the unfortunate soul to take a bite. When bitten, the foe will find their teeth (if they have any) aching in pain from all the sugar and hot poisons. Even if they do swallow the chunk of Fudgie, it will grow back in due time. When bitten, or attacked, Fudgie's sugar rushes about its body like adrenaline and pumps it up, making it a fierce contender in battle. When evolved by trade, Fudgie becomes Mt.Fudgie, and gains a rock typing. Mt.Fudgie lives much like its earlier form, but uses its thickened skin and large grey hump on its head to look like a rock to avoid enemies or ambush prey.

Well, did you get all that? Good! Don't try to be that complex yet if you're still new at it. As long as YOU know that your new specie is complex, then all is not lost!

Next, we have starters. Starters are more specific and they usually serve a purpose. Starters introduce the reader to a taste of new Pokemon found in the region that you're in. Starters need pizzazz, and many of the rules of any Pokemon you will make, as I state above, should still be followed. Still, you must think carefully, and make them unique. Want an example from my story? No? Well, it's on the house, and get yourself another sconde while you're at it, would you? Oh, and get me one too!

Example: In Kertonmel, the starter Pokemon that are commonly given out are Corvolden, the electrical, one eyed ear of corn. Corvolden is unique in that it has no green on its body. The leafy arms of corn that surround its body are a brownish coloe, much like a dried leaf. Its stem tail ends in a spark plug. Its typing is electric/grass, which is a very unique combo. Corvolden's kernels are charged, and if not neutralized, can cause heart problems, comas, and other sorts of problems. When that's dealt with, feast upon the corn, it's a-maize-ing!

After that, we have the fire starter, Fiyrant. Fiyrant is a bug type army, a.k.a. fire ant. Fiyrant gains its fire type at its first evolution. It also might has swarm instead of blaze. Simple enough, considering that Swarm is to bug, as Blaze is to Fire. Basically, the idea is that Fiyrant creates hot sparks by digging rapidly and creating friction, mixed with the burning acidic bile it produces naturally.

Doing an interesting thing like this is a risk to your readers. Fiyrant is supposed to be a fire starter, but its just a crummy bug, and is quite a ule breaker amongst starters. You can be sure Gamefreaks won't use an idea such as that, but don't let that stop you. We have only one more starter to go.

Aqwerd is the water starter. It is unique in its appearance. It is an amorphous Undine. For those of you who don't know what a Undine is, its an elemental nymph of the water. Aqwerd is thusly Awkward aqua, hence the combined name. Like all things, a clever name is important for your Pokemon. Aqwerd has the appearance of a small, reddish-purple mermaid that hovers about a half an inch off the surface. When Aqwerd evolves, it gains a ghost typing. Why upon evolution? Alright, lets think here. Could you really lose with a ghostly lady traipsing through Newb Forest? You hate the thought too, right? Surely by later, most things have bite, thunder shock or absorb to handle its weaknesses.

Now, Aqwerd serves a few purposes. First, lets remember something about starters, they're more often male than female. You don't have to follow this rule. Its mostly just in place so you don't overbreed starters. Aqwerd however, serves the story's purpose of breeding, namely as a big link between water and indeterminate breeding groups. So, a Genger or Magcargo (freakishly enough) with Hydro Pump? Aqwerd's to blame. Does that Lanturn know Night Shade? Yea, that's the stuff. EGADS! Is that Squirtle using Will-o-wisp? Yup yup! That's the story behind the Aqwerd line. Its mostly female for obvious reasons, but it serves a plothole filling purpose of expanding capabilities.

Well, I hope that didn't sound too much like an advertisment for anything, but the point is clear. You want unique starters that will draw the interest of your audience! They must be unique, for they're likely the first of the new species your reader will see. In my case, it's not the case.

Next, we have legendaries. Let's start with the big triad, or rather, those not so uber legendaries who really are still powerful. In my story, these are the Oni, demonic masks with the goal of destruction. Legendaries are special Pokemon. They are mighty, they rare, and they are earthshattering if needbe. In the case of the Oni, there are five of them, and they all have unique personalities and typings as well to befit them. It is likely that your region is going to have its own legends. Like all your Pokemon, think em over carefully! They are often a powerful force in many a story, so don't neglect, or misuse them.

Now that you've heard a bit about how to make good Pokemon (and don't be afraid to show me your creations either, folks,) its time to make a region. First, take a puzzel piece out of Middle Earth, and cast it into the fires of Mt. Doo... god dang it! Who switched my script on me? Oh, here we go. Find an area on the planet, and set your region there. I picked Mongolia, because I loved the history of the warring conquests of Mongols, and the Huns long before their trek to Rome, back when they would harass China and Russia. As such, there is little water,and deserts, steppes, and tundras.

That reminds me! If you make a region, while keeping it unique, don't make it TOO unique. You want it to be a somewhat believable habitat. If not, your region may be worthy of being called (Mary)Suetopia! You don't want to make Suetopia, because a perfect region gets perfect bombings from imperfect, jealous neighbors.

Even still on this subject, remember the size of the world. If your story considers the only regions in the world to be Kanto, Johto, Oore, and Hoenn, then man should just transport life to the moon. The moon would dwarf your five region planet!

Well, is your region uniquely realistic? Remember, don't make it dull, but if it's too amazing, that's not good either.

Anyway, you probably want to set up gyms now, right?

I would like to volunteer as a tutor. I will help with making Trainer fics. Lets face it, they're a hot topic amongst writers, but not amongst readers. I wish to help bring respect and an idea of 'we mean business' to the world of Original Trainer Fics. Also, of course, I would like to help with Fanmade. I'm willing to guide people through making their fanmade Pokemon, and even giving them ideas, provided that they give me credit for my assistance. Still, I feel that there is a lot of potential out there, but it just isn't expressed right. I wish to fix that.

I can also do drama. When writing drama, remember that angst will likely be a common element. Don't let it envelope the story though.

So, yea, I'll be a Trainer, and Fanmade tutor, if I may. Trust me, I won't bite. In fact, I applaud such a precautious measure as to go for a secon opinion.

Timid Kyogre
12th February 2006, 3:48 PM
My tip is for Fantasy fics...I'll add more advices as the chapters of The Forgotten Enchantment increase:

If you want to write fantasy, make it a special plot. Make it unpredictable and nice, and never try to spoil anything. This is where your imagination could be used, freaky or not just use it, you never know. Mine is a superpower family idea, but it has its unique twist. Seven sisters, six have powers while one doesn't and the youngest was kidnapped. The story is kind of long but the whole thing is unpredictable for sure. Use different stuff, don't make everything the same thing. Like a city full of psychics, change it to something like this: A city that is mostly filled with psychics, while one person named (Lia, for example) is pretending to be a psychic while she has the most feared power in the whole town...The dark power. Wasn't my best idea but yeah, just an example.

Fantasy is all about imagination, don't let it be too silly, just nice. Again, you never know, somebody may like your freaky five headed dragon who is a scaredy cat ;)

Oh yeah and another general tip: Well, this may not be true to everyone but it is to me. You can't force yourself to think of a story, it just comes. I'd seriously love to write other stuff than Fantasy but Fantasy is what I'm good at, I'm practicing.

If you'd like to write Fantasy just send me a PM and I'll give you more advice, but I'd seriously want an advice from an author who writes Horror (and is good at it)

~Timid Kyogre

Da' dude
12th February 2006, 4:54 PM
Dilasc

So, yea, I'll be a Trainer, and Fanmade tutor, if I may. Trust me, I won't bite. In fact, I applaud such a precautious measure as to go for a secon opinion.

Timid Kyogre

If you'd like to write Fantasy just send me a PM and I'll give you more advice

Cool! Welcome aboard!

Nylf
12th February 2006, 6:07 PM
I'll help with romance and fanmade as well.

Another tip for baddies. In Pokemon fics, particularly fanmade/new region ones, if you're making a new team, don't make another Team Aqua/Magma/Rocket rip off. I can't stand the idea of 'Team Sky' who hunt Rayquaza. Try something original. And actually EVIL. Theft and poor living conditions? Yeah, it's good in the bad department, but there are worse things. How about maniacal genetic modification, Shadow Pokemon mass production, mass murder, brain washing, human experimentation and freakish hybrid experimentation? Now that's evil. And the idea behind my original team, Team Abomination. It helps to make an interesting name as well. 'Team Missile', 'Team Sky' or 'Team Bullet' are dull. The dictionary and thesaurus are your friends.

Ledian_X
12th February 2006, 6:14 PM
Yeah, Nylf that's evil. Team Rocket is only semi-evil. Not evil enough. As in..they've never killed anyone. Yeah they had guns in the Dratini ep but in all fairness, that was the warden's gun and the reason it's been banned is kinda lame when you consider GI Joe had worse back in the 80s.


Anyway, that's a topic for a whole other debate. I help too with romance and anything else thrown my way. Only thing I ask is that when you create a superpowered character, do not rip off anyone directly by giving someone the powers the same way.

LX

Eternal Daydreamer
12th February 2006, 7:03 PM
I'll help more with fantasy, if you want. About baddies, I have something to add as well:

As Nylf said, don't ripoff the original teams. The originals were bad enough. Other than superhero stories, there is some good inspiration for baddies. Fairytales, folk tales, ballads, myths. Even childrens books!

If you want a bad guy to do the stuff he does for the fact that the world needs morality, look at Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory for instance. He may not seem evil, but he does torture children and put their lives in danger.

Anyways, another example of a baddie is the Mirror Queen from The Brothers Grimm. She's this very old crone who wants youth again. How does she do it? Kill twelve innocent girls from the local village. And she doesn't do it herself, she uses guess what, magic to do it.

Villians can vary between story and story. If it's about a village suffering from change, why not have a local witch stir things up? Or if it's about a forest being destroyed, the local CEO is a villian. It all depends.

Elemental Charizam
12th February 2006, 9:07 PM
Here's an OT tip:

If you have a party of characters, as many OT authors do, remember that there's no rule that says the main male and the main female character have to fall in love. Just because its common to do so doesn't mean its right for your fic.

Thank you, you''ve been a great audience!

Kiyohime
12th February 2006, 9:24 PM
Random gore, spewing guts, and dripping brains in inopportune moments does not equate a good horror story. A good horror story bides its time...disturbs people...makes them imagine everything by themselves...you do not have to literally shove their heads into a gore-cake.

And 10-year olds don't know what true love is. WTF.

Dilasc
12th February 2006, 9:30 PM
Here's another tip for trainer fics.

By way of every godgiven power you possess, DO NOT start the fic on the main character's birthday! It smells of Susan Be Maryism

Elemental Charizam
12th February 2006, 9:32 PM
Sounds more like a common garden variety cliché to me, but whatever :P

Well, lots of people use characters older than ten. Like Saber, or Breezy. It still doesn't mean the main characters have to fall in love though ;P

Another tip for original trainer fics:

Pokémon don't have to be zany or have extreme personalities - they just need to be believable, valid characters who aren't pokébots. How much you want to focus on their characters is up to you, jhust so long as its clear they aren't just mindless automatons.

Eternal Daydreamer
12th February 2006, 9:40 PM
Pokémon don't have to be zany or have extreme personalities - they just need to be believable, valid characters who aren't pokébots. How much you want to focus on their characters is up to you, jhust so long as its clear they aren't just mindless automatons.

It depends, really on the plot. Say in The Chocolate Factory, my Pokemon characters are really extreme. But that's because of the plot. Would you like to see an Augustus Gloop character that doesn't binge, or how about a Veruca who isn't a brat? But the rules are slightly different in parodies. I'll explain later.

Kiyohime
12th February 2006, 9:45 PM
Mmm, well it's a POKEMON fanfiction, so you'd think we should be focusing on the Pokemon, too. XD

Elemental Charizam
12th February 2006, 9:48 PM
Well, they CAN work as zany characters, but they don't have to be :D

And yeah, you would. But maybe it might be more about being a trainer of pokémon than the creatures themselves. I try not to give absolutes in advice...

Kiyohime
12th February 2006, 9:50 PM
True, true. ^^ I'll back out, as you guys have been writing more OT fanfictions, and I'm still only working on my first. XD

IceKing
12th February 2006, 9:54 PM
Comedy Tips:

1.Watch some comedic movies that fit into your favorite type of comedy.
2.Try and avoid "Fart" jokes, they tend to be really immature
3.Try and emphasize the unreal things of pokemon, poke fun at your charachters flaws/perfections, add some parody humor in their!
4.Have nice over-exaggerated charachters on purpose. Their always a blast
5.Let humor come naturally

FlamingRuby
12th February 2006, 9:55 PM
Attention please, this class on variety show fics is now in session...

Welcome...I am FlamingRuby, the creator of the hit variety show fic "The Ash and Pikachu Show". I bet you're wondering 'How do I make a variety show fic that'll give FR a run for her money?'

Glad you asked! In today's class, we'll look at the basics of a variety show like Ash and Pikachu. (hereafter reffered to as ANP so I don't have to type it so often)

What's in a Name?

Your "show"'s name is how people will remember it, so choose wisely! Some good choices for names include the name of your host character, but in the case of ANP, I used the host character's name (Ash) and the host character's favorite Pokemon (Pikachu). These are not the only choices for names, but make sure your name is a good one!

Seasons?

Depending on how popular your "show" gets, you may decide to write several "seasons" of it...but the big question is: How long do you make them?

In TV land, a season is roughly 50 episodes (sometimes less, sometimes more), but you don't have to adhere to this rule; you can have the season count match your star Pokemon's Pokedex number. (like I do with ANP, each "season" has 25 episodes, which matches Pikachu's Pokedex number). Just to allay confusion, just number your episodes consecutively. (i.e. if your Season 1 finale is, say, Episode 30, the Season 2 premiere counts as Episode 31).

Likewise, it's also a good idea to introduce new elements to your "show" each season to keep readers interested, but we'll talk more on this later.

Puttin' It All Together!

Okay, so you have a show name, enough material for several seasons, and are wondering how to structure your show....it's called a "variety show" for a reason: there's a variety of things that happen on the show, and hopefully you have a variety of material to work with...otherwise your readers will be bored.

Here's the basic backbone of ANP:

--OP sequence
--welcome and intro (Ash)
--cartoon
--Misty/May segement (living comics for Misty, skits for May)
--cartoon
--musical number (Brock)
--cartoon
--closing/credits (sometimes there's an after credit gag, depending on the show's theme

Please note that this plan is not seet in stone...I sometimes cut parts of this or add to it depending on the show's theme.

Next: The cast and a grand entrance!

Power Shot
12th February 2006, 10:22 PM
And since I have free time, I will talk to you all about suspense and its role in the modern day fic.

What is Suspense?

Suspense is the element of writing that leaves the readers wondering what's going to happen next, or the ability to tell a story without giving away the details to everything the instant they show up. To me, this is one of the most important elements in a story, as anyone will tell you if they have read my fics.

Suspense creates a feeling of wonder in a reader, and causes them to think about the future and past of a fic. What happened to make an event trigger for example.

How do I create Suspense in a Fic?

This is one of the easiest thing in the world to do, but only if you really want to do it. Suspense advances the story without making it seem so. For example, for this lesson I will be using After Hoenn, my best-recieved fic on the site.

After Hoenn is an AdvanceShipping fic set ten years after the anime. Why would I do something like that? Well, to make a great story. It begins with everyone believing Ash is dead while in fact he is living in Orre, with May unhappily married to Drew.

That right there sets the stage for Suspence. Why would Ash pretend he is dead? Why would May marry Drew if she is in love with Ash? Those questions, instead of being answered in the beginning, are gradually shown through flashbacks that explain how the characters became how they are in the fic. A fic normally has the questions answered early on, but that can make for boring reading because there are no questions left if you use them up. But extending that, and drawing them out until you'd really need them, people want to read the next chapter in order to find out the causes of the past, and what will happen in the future.

Next time, I will speak about originality in Suspense, and how that relates to creating a powerful storyline. I hope everyone enjoyed that.

Monk76
12th February 2006, 10:53 PM
I would like to add my services as a writing tutor. Having been writing since I was 9 (I'm 29 now) I feel I have a lot to offer to others who are looking to improve their writing skills or just getting started.

Da' dude
12th February 2006, 11:00 PM
I would like to add my services as a writing tutor. Having been writing since I was 9 (I'm 29 now) I feel I have a lot to offer to others who are looking to improve their writing skills or just getting started.

Wow! Tutors are coming by the second! Hope you recieved my PM "Monky"!

Kidding about funny nickname!

Monk76
12th February 2006, 11:08 PM
Wow! Tutors are coming by the second! Hope you recieved my PM "Monky"!

Kidding about funny nickname!

Actualy, my childhood nickname was monkey. I don't mind.

Da' dude
12th February 2006, 11:10 PM
Sorry to double post, but here's something else about villains. They don't have to be mucho evil or "evil" at all. For example, in my fic, one my main characters has a demon within her. And a major part of the fic is her friends helping her to control it and get it out. so techincally the hero is also the villian.

Dilasc
12th February 2006, 11:11 PM
Uh, we should add a section for Characters, since it is a big subject and well, there are characters in every story made by everyone everywhere, unless I'm extremely mistaken.

Anyway, character tips plus many other random tips:
No character is perfect to his or her said personality traits, or at least, they should not be. Sure you could say a character is mean, but no doubt he has some soft spots. Uh, yes, that's a soft spot too, but you got a lot of balls to say that here. I'm talking about points to contradict current characterization. Let's face it, characters must change with time. It's only proper, after all.

Everyone has a small degree of hypocracy in their character, so be ready for it. We all write ourselves into spots where the only good way out is to bend the character's personality just a bit, so when the time comes, make sure you have the biggest explanation why the nasty jerk is saving the lady from the burning building while risking his own life.

Angsty, comedic and dramatic characters help bring in readers as they stand out in everyone's mind as favorites. Be sure to have at least of each. You can have more if you don't make them carbon clones of each other under the guise of a different mug, but be careful.

Good and evil are fickle things. Sometimes you can bait someone into thinking someone is evil, only to turn it in their faces and show them they're wrong. After all, he's not evil, he's just misunderstood. Remember, good and evil are created by a societal mindset and thus, should never be taken at face value.

I like cheese, but not every character does. Give your characters strengths and weaknesses, as well as disorders and disabilities if need be. Lactose Intolerence, Claustrophobia, and AIDS are just a few examples of what could work. Well, maybe not AIDS, but you know what I'm saying! Remember, I am overly dramatic, that is my personal character trait, and I will milk this monkey train until its undeath is ended infinity times over. Anyway, back on track. While having flaws of this sort can make your characters more real, they are not copouts. You must still make your characters good and believable.

Pokemon can also have traits like those said above, with great variances of course due to their species. Maybe you have a Pokemon with a missing ear or eye. It doesn't deter them too much, as the ear drum is inside the head, and they still have another eye. Don't overdo it though. If you're trying to jerk tears by having a Pokemon be born blind, without a tongue, who's lost both arms in battle... do the poor creature a favor and mercy kill it, before readers mercilessly rate how Anti-sue you're being.

Sanity is a privilege, not a right, nor is it something that all people have. Logic is the same and should not be granted when the hero needs a big plan out of the blue. If the hero should get one, then surely every opponent of his should get exactly the same amount of favors as he does. It's only fair.

Love is a fickle thing. You're safer with wild lust where you can have Diglett on Wailord... uh, whoops. Uh, yea, anyone who is prude, you don't have to read this one. Just remember that humans and Pokemon are creatures with instincts and urges. You don't have to tell us, the read about how often your main character honks his horn, but just remember that they are people, and that we don't all live in a world of prudes.

As such, every character deserves at least one hour over the course of their story to do what they want to themselves. It's only fair to each and every character.

Every action has at least, and usually more than one cause. Said action likely has at least one or more effects on the future. Remember that the next time your characters do anything, and multiply the times you remember by three each and every time someone travels to the past. Travelling to the future, multiply your reassurance by 1.6, as future travel can be explained by explaining the past. However, multiply that by 2 if you have your character return to the past to mend the future.

If you've had five travels to the past, you better remember 243 times at bare minimum that there are always effects on the future, even if all you do in the past is cause a dust particle to fly in the opposite direction. What if said dust particle blinds the president? What if because he's now blind, he tells his neighboring nation's leader while blinded by rage (rimshot!) to fornicate himself with other men? As you can see, time travel is something you don't want to mess around with.

Characters need to eat, poop, and deal with hygenic aspects of their life. I guess I could have said this in the article on sexual/physical pleasures, but oh well. I let it be known that bathing and tooth care are a rarity amongst trainers, especially if they're lazy about something so boring.

Having the names Mary, and Susan of any variation within the same party is as risky as waging war alone against an entire army. I don't mean for your characters, I mean for your story's popularity. Even if Mary/Maria/Marie/etc. and Susan/Sue/Suzanna/Suzie are seperate characters, be wary of making them friends.

By that token, Garrick and his friend Stuart are also a very risky idea.

Sex is not evil or wrong. Rape is not included in this simple equation. Wanting sex can be a more reasonable want than romance, as it doesn't need to bud into a relationship. You're free to keep the characters along their own path if you ever choose to make a sequel. Just be sure to add jokes about 'inadequacies' if you're feeling naughty.

Color is not seen through everyone's eyes. Some people may be colorblind, or nearsighted. This small fact is important when writing in the first person.

Sometimes, when it comes to big backstories, there's a point at which it drags on so long that you might as well have the character say "A plot hole ate my homework!"

While I'm on it, having plot holes isn't always a bad thing. You can intentionally leave a plot hole which you'll later fill with new adversaries, new plot points, and other fun trivia. A Plot hole can be used to make a plot twist as well. The few things you don't want your plothole to be, are inconveniences, nor do you want them to be left open forever. If you don't want to fill a plot hole, then at least cover it up with something simple and unimportant that the reader may want to think about for eons! Plot holes are very tricky!

Akilah Imani
12th February 2006, 11:17 PM
My suggestion for all of them is be creative. If its been done millions of times either: add your own spin on things or do something else. Use punctuation. Don't make your whole story one big paragraph.

Sentence = A group of words that expresses a complete thought and ends in punctuation (period, question mark, exclamation point).

Find your target audience and target them. If you want to write stories directed towards younger children don't write a story worthy of a college essay. If you're leaning more or so towards an older audience, don't write like you're talking to a two year old. If you want to do horror, find out what people like and don't like, then think about why they do or don't, see what's been done, and plan your story around that. If you're satisfied, release it out into the public.

Mystery
Before you even start, make sure that you have at least some idea of what you are doing. Map it out. Also, don't be so friggin' obvious. I hate it when I read mysteries that give away the ending by the second or third chapter. Mysteries are kind of hard to tackle, you need a good plot, interesting characters, suspense, excrutiating detail, and twists and turns that are way to advance for anyone who can't write a grammatically coherent paragraph. so plan, think, edit, rethink, and map out before you even make an attempt at writing a mystery.

Always remember: Learn from others. Read fics, novels, reports, or whatever by other accomplished artists. See how they structure their sentences and paragraphs, look at their characters and figure out what makes them who they are, look at the whole plot and theme and think about why you like it so much.

Don't be afraid of constructive criticism. If people don't like it, then they don't.

Psycho

FlamingRuby
12th February 2006, 11:50 PM
Okay, Lesson 2 of Variety Fics 101 is now in session...

The Cast and Crew

The acts are the heart of any variety show...and one way to get those acts is to have a cast for your show.

Each cast member should have a distinct role in the show, even if it's only for comic relief. On the other side of the coin, you can feature guest stars in your cast every so often, but that's another lesson entirely.

Here's the cast of ANP and the jobs they have:

Ash-the host, introduces the acts and keeps the audience entertained if there's a problem...basically keeps the show moving
Pikachu-Ash's sidekick, interacts with the cast and/or guest stars
Misty-the resident artist, anything she draws with her magic pencils comes to life. Hosts the "'Back to the Drawing Board' with Misty" segment
Brock-The musician extrordinaire; he usually has an anime or game song to sing and play guitar on. Sometimes he'll perform on his own, sometimes with the house band. His songs usually fit the theme of the show. Is also known to be yanked offstage if he interrupts the show.
May-Originally planned to host sporting segment; but will host a skit segment in Season 3. (name TBA)

Of course, depending on how many segments you have in your show, your cast may be larger or smaller.

And Now, Please Welcome Your Host...

All right, you've started on the premiere episode of your show...but how are you going to make your host appear to the audience? Will s/he come through an onstage door a la "The Price is Right"? Or will s/he casually walk onstage and say hi? As with all other aspects of writing a variety show fic, the possibilities are endless, but no matter how your host appears, how s/he enters sets the tone for the show ahead.

For ANP, I typically have Ash run onstage...sometimes he waves to the crowd and sometimes he just appears in a spotlight, but on some shows his entrance was dramatically changed to suit the theme of the show.

Here are some of Ash's more crazier entrances:


(We join Ash on the stage as he tunes an acoustic guitar. Pikachu is nearby, clutching a harmonica)

Ash: Oh, hi! I didn't see you there! Tonight we're going to do another musical episode, so Pikachu decided he wanted to play a duet with me. (applause as Ash tunes some more) You ready, Pikachu?


(Ash runs onstage and greets the crowd, this time wearing a Hawaiian print shirt, jeans and sandals.)



(the audience cheers as a spotlight appears at center stage...but no Ash. After a few tense seconds, a blue puff of smoke is seen, revealing Ash clad in his movie 8 costume, causing some curious murmurs to drift through the audience)

Ace Kenshader
13th February 2006, 12:02 AM
Uh, we should add a section for Characters, since it is a big subject and well, there are characters in every story made by everyone everywhere, unless I'm extremely mistaken.

That sound like a good idea Dilasc. Characters are important part of the story.

PDL
13th February 2006, 12:21 AM
Here's some advice on creating atmosphere.

- try to imagine that you are the character in the moment you're writing about, how is he/she feeling? what has happened to him/her? what will happen?

- another good thing to do is add sensory detail... where are you in the fic? what's happening to the character? what is he/she seeing, hearing or smelling even? what is your character experiencing?

Monk76
13th February 2006, 12:43 AM
Creating Villains People Love to Hate

Every story has to have a bad guy. There wouldn't be much conflict for your protagonist to overcome if there was no antagonist to stir the pot.

Yours might be the evil villain who opposes everything your hero (or heroine) does. He might be the treacherous double-agent from the past, or the psychotic evil scientist, or maybe just the "other woman" fighting for your hero's attention.

Whoever your villain is, making sure he is believable is far more difficult than simply creating a character who does bad things to hold up your protagonist's progress.

You job here is to make your villains credible, logical, and believable, but not likeable. You want the reader to understand what they're doing that is such a negative thing for your hero.

But it's more involved than just explaining their adverse actions. Your readers need to understand why the antagonist is doing what he does, and why he believes his actions are justified and rational.

Basically, you need your villains to be real, three-dimensional people.

Unfortunately most "bad guys" are shown as being shallow, narrow-minded creatures whose only ambition is to be as evil as possible. This approach to an antagonist loses the respect of your reader for two reasons:


1.You lose any emotional impact your story had if your readers can not completely believe the threat to your hero is real, or threatening enough. It also lowers the reader's esteem for the hero who they know can only beat this unthreatening villain.


2.A completely evil character equates to a totally weak character to a reader. If your villain's only motivation is evil, this does not give him enough depth of character to become real in your reader's mind. Giving your bad guy only one driving motivator is not enough - especially if you choose a lightweight surface motivator like "evil" or "greed".


Think about when you created your protagonist. Most likely you created someone you admired, a character with strength and integrity. I'm guessing you took the time to get right inside your hero's head and understand what made him tick.
Your villain is no different.

In order to be considered a worthy opponent, you must portray your antagonist honestly. You must be able to get inside his head, too, and learn what drives him to act the way he does.

Remember here that no one sees themselves as mean or evil or *****y or insane or stupid. Your villain won't either. To him, his actions and his logic are perfectly justifiable.

Show your readers this side of your villain's logic and you intensify your story's suspense factor. Show that your antagonist is quite capable of winning the battle and make sure that it seems as though the outcome of your plot is uncertain.

That uncertainty doubles your suspense again, and gives you the perfect opportunity to showcase your hero's qualities as well, thus creating a stronger protagonist just by displaying the comparisons.

Put more simply, your villain has to be good about being a bad guy, but it forces your hero to be even better.

Your readers will be turning page after page to find out if your hero is actually good enough to overcome the monster you forced them to care about, in a twisted kind of way. Remember Silence of the Lambs?

If you can actively portray your villain in his own Point Of View as being an intelligent, logical, complex creature with the capacity to be understanding and reasonable, who does what he does because his reasons are sound to him, then you are on your way to creating a pretty believable villain.

But when you can also show your villain's complex, devious, misguided nature from your hero's Point Of View, you know you've created a truly memorable bad guy, and you will have strengthened your protagonist's character and your plotline at the same time.

Lady Barbara
13th February 2006, 4:12 AM
Remember Silence of the Lambs? If you can actively portray your villain in his own Point Of View as being an intelligent, logical, complex creature with the capacity to be understanding and reasonable, who does what he does because his reasons are sound to him, then you are on your way to creating a pretty believable villain.


Yes, and sometimes no. Truly sociopathic individuals exist in society. These are people who care nothing about other people. They care only about getting what they want, when they want it. Emotions are foreign to them. Read "The Sociopath Next Door," a book written by a psychologist, and you'll see what I mean.

Some psychopathic people (like Buffalo Bill in "Silence of the Lambs") are mentally ill. Make that severely mentally ill. I just completed a book written by Dr. Robert K. Ressler ("Whoever Fights Monsters" is the title), who is a profiler for the FBI's Behavior Science Unit. Some of these people lack the mental capacity to be reasonable and understanding. Richard Speck, a man who brutally murdered eight women in one night, once threw a sparrow into a fan. When asked why, he replied, "If it's not mine, it's nobody's."

My point is that villains can be completely, unquestionably evil, just like the serial killers who populate our world. And if your villain suffers from some mental or physical illness, please research it. I've seen "transvestite" and "transsexual" mistakenly described as being the same thing, when they're not.

Seiryu
13th February 2006, 8:49 AM
I think I would like to add a little bit on the subject of Original Trainer fanfics.

Okay. The way I see things, an "original trainer" fic is one that involves an original main character as a pokémon trainer. Also, I find that the OT "genre" is one of the broadest genres in the fandom. Remember that an original trainer can come from just about any walk of life. An original trainer can be someone who lives in a city slum and befriended a stray creature, someone who competes in underground battles, a member of Team Rocket, or a more "upstanding" character like a League campaigner, a coordinator, or a breeder.

If you are writing a chaptered OT fic, then your character is probably going on some sort of journey, correct? Stop and think about what kind of journey you want it to be. Maybe the character wants to become a League champion, a master coordinator, or just to see the world. Don't think that you're limited to the conventional "get eight badges, compete in League" thing; all of my major fanfictions are OT fics and while they do have journeys of sorts, they aren't...conventional trainer journeys, to say the least.

But whatever you do, make sure you make things interesting. If you're writing a journeyfic all the way through, give it something to make the readers come back for more. Show Team Rocket in a new light, give your characters memorable (yet still believable!) personatlities...do whatever is necessary to not make reading your work a chore for your readers. Heck, if your character has pretty much a totally uninteresting journey and all of the action and plot occurs later on, then feel free to skip the journey up to that point! There is nothing wrong with starting off with an established trainer! Your goal, as a writer, is to keep things interesting; that way, your readers will enjoy it throughout and you'll be less tempted to give up halfway through.

Also on the subject of OT fics, I think I'll say something about starters.

Okay. I've seen many people gripe about pokémon that are regularly seen as "overused" and "underused." My advice: ignore them. If you can write it, do it. It's not about the content, it's about the execution. Some of the best fics I've ever read have featured "overused" pokémon (Charizard, Scyther, Vulpix, etc.) as prominent characters. Heck, my fics contain a couple of "overused" pokémon in that manner. There is nothing wrong with using them.

However, there are a couple of guidelines that should be used when considering what pokémon a character should have. The biggest one is probably this: how logical is it? For instance, if you have a newbie trainer starting off in Pallet Town, would it really be logical for him to start with, say, a Dratini? The location of your character plays a big role in determining his starter pokémon. For a Pallet trainer, a number of choices could include the three starters or some common wild creatures such as Pidgey or Rattata. If you have him starting with (or, later on, capturing) something not easily obtained from the immediate area, then you'd better have a damn good reason, especially if it's wild-caught.

Another good choice for newbie trainers (should their parents allow it) might be a family pet or something. However, these are still fairly limited as far as logic goes; most families would only keep pokémon pets that would equate to good pets in our universe. Things like Growlithe, Pidgey, Hoothoot, Taillow, Meowth, Skitty, and the like are good examples of "pet" pokémon. Again, it is possible to have something different, but again, you'd better have a really good reason for it.

Of course, there is one thing that is so painfully obvious that I shouldn't have to mention it: starting with (and capturing) legendary pokémon is looked down upon extremely harshly in the general fandom. Most of them are powerful enough that one might almost consider them the gods of that world, and even the ones that aren't all powerful are important enough that capturing them could very well disturb...well, a number of things about the world, like the ever-present balance of nature. I've only seen maybe two fanfics that do the whole legendary-capturing thing even remotely well, and so many others that attempt it are shot down for...well, not having much (if any) logical reasoning to them.

My advice here: unless you know what you're doing and you know you can do it in a way that's pleasing to the majority of your readers, you might be better off limiting the legendaries to a few sightings, if even that.

Jetx
13th February 2006, 11:59 AM
Advice for mystery:

Make a number of suspects, and a number of reasons why each would do what they did. Each of them has to do something suspicious and something that lowers their chances. You need to confuse the readers so that they all different opinions on who did it. And as it comes to an end slowly fix the pieces together.

Akilah Imani
13th February 2006, 11:22 PM
At times there are words that we have gotten so used to saying that we either may use them improperly or "over use" them. Let's expand out vocabulary shall we? Here's a list of substitutions for overly used words in grammar (reports, stories, books, essays, fics, ect.):

Because
Examples: because she, because they weren't, he hit him because
Meanings: 1. For the reason that; since
Words that you could substitute for because: as, being, considering, due to, for, in that, now, over, owing to, seeing (as), since, thanks to, through, whereas, being how, for, forasmuch as, inasmuch as, insomuch as, now, pending

Very
Examples: very high, very large, very smart, very cool, very sad
Meanings: 1. In a high degree 2.Truly; absolutely
Words that you could substitute for very: absolutely, extremely, indispensably, largely, notably, noticeably, particularly, positively, powerfully, pressingly, pretty, incredibly, remarkably, substantially, superlatively, surpassingly, surprisingly, terribly, truly, uncommonly, unusually, vastly, wonderfully, genuinely.

Like
Examples: she moved like a cat, it was like a tree, sort of like
Meanings: 1. Possessing the characteristics of; resembling closely; similar to 2. Such as; for example
Words that you could substitute for like: as, such as, parallel to, related to, relating, similar to, resembling, same, according to, agnate, identical to, equal to, equivalent to

Thing
Examples: I grabbed my things, the thing I saw, a thing, those things
Meanings: 1. An entity, an idea, or a quality perceived, known, or thought to have its own existence 2. Something referred to by a word, a symbol, a sign, or an idea; a referent 3. a creature
Words that you could substitute for thing: article, being, commodity, existence, existent, individual, object, substance, notion, thought, attitude, article, attribute, characteristic, detail, element, facet, factor, feature, item, particular, point, property, quality, statement, idea, happening, accomplishment, action, circumstance, deed, doing, duty, episode, event, eventuality, exploit, creature, animal, beast

a lot
Examples: there were a lot of, a lot of people, a whole lot
Meanings: 1. Very many, a large number; also, very much
Words that you could substitute for a lot: pile, portion, quantity, an abundance, much, tons, oodles, a copious amount, a plethora, a large amount

Many
Examples: too many, many of them, that many, so many, very many
Meanings: 1. Being one of a large indefinite number; numerous 2. Amounting to or consisting of a large indefinite number
Words that you could substitute for many: various, loads, immeasurable, incalculable, infinite, innumerous, multiple, bags, gobs, heaps, horde, jillion, large numbers, lots, mass, endless, calcuable mess, multitude, oodles, piles, plenty, rafts, scads, scores, thousands, tons, uncountable

Then
Examples: Then she, and then he, then they entered the hut, but then
Meanings: 1. At that time 2. Next in time, space, or order 3.In addition; moreover
Words that you could substitute for then: after, afterwards, another time, behind, ensuingly, eventually, intra, late, later, latterly, next, soon, subsequently, thereafter, thereon, ultimately, additionally, also, besides, further, furthermore, moreover,sequent, sequential

Some
Examples: Some of them, he found some, some people, can some of you
Meanings: 1. Being an unspecified number or quantity 2. Being a considerable number or quantity 3.Being a portion
Words that you could substitute for some: a bit, a little, all, each, either, in general, part of, several, specific, various, a few, miscellaneous, so-so, sort of, kind of, a couple

Good and/or Great
Examples: It was good, that was good, it felt good, she was good, good job
Meanings: 1. Being positive or desirable in nature; not bad or poor 2. Of high quality 3. Superior to the average
Words that you could substitute for good: pleasant, satisfying, excellent, exceptional, favorable, first-class, first-rate, admirable, blameless, charitable, dutiful, estimable, ethical, exemplary, guiltless, honest, honorable, incorrupt, inculpable, innocent, able, accomplished, adept, adroit, competent, remarkable, extroadinary, important, marvelous, tremendous, terrific, commendable

Said
Examples: She said, then he said, said the old man, It said
Meanings: 1. To utter aloud; pronounce 2. To express in words
Words that you could substitute for said: spoke, stated, told, narated, articulated, voiced, uttered, accounted, assumed, announced, mentioned, cried, screamed, sobbied, whispered, mumbled, growled, hissed


^Those are just a few suggestions. I'm not saying that you should stop using them, you just may want to change things up from time to time and take a breather. Don't want your readers to get bored do you? No. So be sure to add few new words to season the brain food you get from literature 8D

Psycho

Chibi Pika
14th February 2006, 12:00 AM
Ooh, I got an idea. hope someone hasn't commented on it yet *too lazy to check*

Legendaries
Yes, most of us have at least one Legendary we have a soft spot for, and I doubt there are any of us that have never wanted our main character to get on good relations with one. As far as Legendaries go, most people don't advise them, but I'm a very big supporter of Legendary fics.

But don't do it unless you know what you're doing. Most poeple don't. Heck, I don't even think I do. But I honestly have a scene in my fic that satirizes fics with bad Legendary handling.

Course, when I was in my original revision, I had Legendary captures running rampant. :rolleyes:

Ya gotta know that a kid can't capture a Legendary. Even if they had a Master Ball cannon and the Legendary was very weak and they actually did catch it, why would the thing listen to them? Exactly. The second the kid opened the ball, it would kill them and fly/run away.

If you just have to have the main character get close to a Legendary, however, there are ways to handle it.

1. Just start with a couple sightings. Not without reason of course--don't just have them be starting out and then all of a sudden, "OMGZ, there's Suicune!!!!!111" You could tie in the Legendaries' guardian role, maybe have a Legendary save the main character from a natural disaster. If you do that, thogh, make there be other people there that see the Legendary, so it's like "Whee I saw a Legendary, I'm speshulz!"

2. Give the Legendaries personality!!! Make Suicune a hothead, Mew reclusive and wise, Zapdos somber and hopeful, Lugia big on vengeance, the sky's the limit. Think outside the box!!!

3. Make the antagonist capture a Legendary if you just have to have 'em in the fic. Cause odds are, the antagonist would be so determined that they'd be willing to use mind control and that junk. And don't have the main character "save" the Legendary from "dat bad persun!!!" It's even rarer that that's pulled off ><

3. You could have the Legendary get ticked off at the main character. That's always fun ^^ Just be sure to have a very strong reason why the Legendary doesn't kill the kid. You can have them want to kill the kid, though XP

4. I like this one the best--have the main character get in over their head. Have them find out something about the Legendaries that they're not supposed to know, and so they have to get involved with the Legendaries or else be killed. Again, a real strong reason needed here.

Oh yeh, and "Chosen" fics...I'll be honest. Not to sound egotistical, but aside from my own fic, I've only seen one, maybe two of these that have worked. You reeeeaaally gotta know what you're doing. I'm not even sure that mine is all that great *shot by LC readers.* And try to stay away from fate. Make the kid prove themself, not just be destined.

~Chibi~;249;<?>;rukario;

Keleri
14th February 2006, 2:04 AM
I'll offer a tidbit on fan-created pokémon, since I'm quite heavily into that. Creating pokémon is extremely subjective, so there aren't many hard and fast rules about what to do, but one that I can state with certainty is that you want your creations to be stand-alone. That is, you want to describe them in and of themselves, not state something like "it's a green charmander with a bulb on its tail instead of fire". Don't use the official pokémon as a crutch!

And... well, for newbie pokémon creators: if you look at the official pokémon, they're all either based on a real-world creature or combination thereof (say, arcanine or persian) or are something completely outlandish that's harder to classify (hitmonlee, perhaps; it's anthropomorphic to some degree, but the furthest I can get is 'Mr. Potato-head Gone Wrong').

You may want to start small, to warm up your creative muscles by taking some real world animal not currently featured in the official rosters (a dolphin, maybe, or a kangaroo), and then exaggerating some trait of the animal's to associate it with an elemental type. Maybe the kangaroo could be a fighting-type, since male kangaroos are said to 'box' one another; the dolphin could be water/psychic since dolphins are some of the most intelligent animals. Not very exciting or different, but it works, and it's fine for just practicing--not every pokémon you create will hit it off with the readers, anyway.

Another common feature of pokémon based on real-world animals is that they are not just the animal with a fancy name; they have some sort of patterning or ornamentation that makes them unique. Rapidash, for instance, is not just a horse; it's a horse with a horn and a flaming mane and tail. This part is harder, and sometimes I can't think of anything very good for it, but when you do, it often makes the pokémon. Without this nebulous feature, a potential pokémon is often not much more exciting than the normal animal, but with too many accessories or suchlike, they start to seem more like a digimon (to me, at least). The official pokémon, although they've become more ornate in recent years, still tend to have fairly simple designs, which can work in your favor (or against it).

I'm really not very good at coming up with the 'weird' pokémon--I like creating pokémon from interesting animals and plants better, anyway. I think it's okay if you don't have 'weird' pokémon, especially if you're writing: it's easier to describe pokémon with real-world equivalents in text (although still, occasionally, somewhat unwieldy), but if you can draw it makes it much easier.

Eternal Daydreamer
14th February 2006, 2:26 AM
Remember Silence of the Lambs? If you can actively portray your villain in his own Point Of View as being an intelligent, logical, complex creature with the capacity to be understanding and reasonable, who does what he does because his reasons are sound to him, then you are on your way to creating a pretty believable villain.

This is truly correct. May I use examples of some insane villians using their own logic? Ahem.. And note, some may not consider these "villians" but just humor me.

Willy Wonka:
Now, this "candyman" is a real killer. Sort of.. If you misbehave in his world of "Pure Imagination" you get killed. Be it from drowning or being burnt up in a furnace. His logic is that the world is corrupt and children must suffer for other people to notice.

In other words, kill kids and have people blame the kids. And make it look like an accident.

The Mirror Queen:

Ah, eternal life but not eternal youth. Solution? Steel the youth from twelve virgins. Cliche but a witch has to do something to get noticed. People aren't as jumpy as they once were.

Molly:

Yes that Molly. Yes that girl from the third movie with the floating letters. I'm not talkin' about stealing Ash's mom is her "evilness". I'm talkin' about the adult Molly. So she's not yet a villian but she will be. In the future. Meh, so she's the villian in my Fairytale. But she is worth a mention.

She just want's attention. And kidnapping females is what she's famed for...

Legend
14th February 2006, 2:53 AM
Wonka didn't kill the kids. Some were permenantly disfigured, but nothing was fatal. Although, when one uses the four "bad" kids as symbols for deadly sins, he's clearly a combo of wrath and lust (yes, it can mean more than desire for sex.)

Eternal Daydreamer
14th February 2006, 2:59 AM
Wonka didn't kill the kids. Some were permenantly disfigured, but nothing was fatal. Although, when one uses the four "bad" kids as symbols for deadly sins, he's clearly a combo of wrath and lust (yes, it can mean more than desire for sex.)
Ahem, I said some may say otherwise. Wonka is a killer. I mean the original Wonka from the musical starring Gene Wilder. Here's a link that will show you that he's insane: http://www.geocities.com/snortar/rants.html

And if we were going by the old movie, Wonka wouldn't be those two sins. Augustus would have lust (along with gluttony, he craves chocolate) and Mike repersents not only sloth but wrath. He has a whole lot of guns, remember.

Keleri
14th February 2006, 4:12 AM
Ahem, I said some may say otherwise. Wonka is a killer. I mean the original Wonka from the musical starring Gene Wilder. Here's a link that will show you that he's insane: http://www.geocities.com/snortar/rants.html


While I don't deny that the character of Willy Wonka (especially as portrayed by Gene Wilder) is a little unhinged, he didn't KILL anyone. In the 1971 movie, I believe we don't see what ultimately happened to the other children, but considering the enormous backlash that would have occured if four highly visible (re: all the media coverage of the golden ticket event) people and their parents disappeared, I don't think Wonka would be so insane as to render himself unable to sell his product. So given that, and based on what happened in the book, I think it's safe to say that no one DIED--possibly they were sent home without chocolate for 'stealing', as the 'rules' apparently stated, but no-one died. o_O

Eternal Daydreamer
14th February 2006, 4:46 AM
While I don't deny that the character of Willy Wonka (especially as portrayed by Gene Wilder) is a little unhinged, he didn't KILL anyone.
Gawd, I may have triggered a flame war... Ahem, as I was saying... Ah ha! But would you blame him if he did kill those four kids? I wouldn't.

In the 1971 movie, I believe we don't see what ultimately happened to the other children, but considering the enormous backlash that would have occured if four highly visible (re: all the media coverage of the golden ticket event) people and their parents disappeared, I don't think Wonka would be so insane as to render himself unable to sell his product.
Valid point. But, Wonka is so revered in that world, he could come up with an aliby. "Well, Augustus fell in/she was doing something that I told her not to! It's not my fault!" See? Anyways, he could try to cover it up. After all, it's only five dissapearances. (Only the four children and Mr. Salt.)

So given that, and based on what happened in the book, I think it's safe to say that no one DIED--possibly they were sent home without chocolate for 'stealing', as the 'rules' apparently stated, but no-one died. o_O
In the book, they didn't meet a Slugworth, albiet a fake one. If they did go scott free, they would run to him and sell the secrets. After all, it's the rotten kid's way of revenge. Wonka's not so sane that he doesn't realize a threat to his factory, you know.

I do not wish to discuss this issue further in this thread, PM me if you wish to continue this.

Ledian_X
14th February 2006, 5:18 AM
Guys..get back on topic. We're not here to discuss Wonka. Let's discuss tips shall we?

LX

Da' dude
14th February 2006, 5:29 AM
Guys..get back on topic. We're not here to discuss Wonka. Let's discuss tips shall we?

LX

THANK YOU! No offense guys, but the Wonka thing was kind of old...

Shadowcat
14th February 2006, 2:21 PM
Romance:

To have romance, you have to have chemistry between your characters. Don't make it so random, like love at first sight. The only thing that would have happen was Brock and Lucy, unless you feel like you can pull it off, but it is kind of clinche. And try not to go for too clinche romance, like love/hate and main male character/main female character unless you feel like you can pull it off.

Hints always help create chemistry between characters. Simple signs of love are blushing, kissing and the stuff which almost all of you know. If you'd like help, you can always PM me.

And I posted this specifically on Valentine's Day, 'cause of the romance stuff.

Da' dude
14th February 2006, 4:17 PM
Romance:

To have romance, you have to have chemistry between your characters. Don't make it so random, like love at first sight. The only thing that would have happen was Brock and Lucy, unless you feel like you can pull it off, but it is kind of clinche. And try not to go for too clinche romance, like love/hate and main male character/main female character unless you feel like you can pull it off.

Hints always help create chemistry between characters. Simple signs of love are blushing, kissing and the stuff which almost all of you know. If you'd like help, you can always PM me.

And I posted this specifically on Valentine's Day, 'cause of the romance stuff.

Nice...happy Valentines everyone!

Oh, forgot to mention, welcome to the crew Monk76!

Monk76
14th February 2006, 4:19 PM
Nice...happy Valentines everyone!

Oh, forgot to mention, welcome to the crew Monk67!


That would be Monk76.

Da' dude
14th February 2006, 4:26 PM
That would be Monk76.
I accidently typed the numbers backwards...sorry.

Dilasc
14th February 2006, 10:28 PM
A big tip to anyone and everyone! Read fics! Seriously! The best way to learn what's what is to go read fics, especially those of the subject you wish to write about.

If you wish to write horror, read horror stories. If you wish to write Original Trainers, read those kinds of stories. If you want a story with fanmade Pokemon, read one of those stories. Drama? Yea, I hate repeating the same thing OVER and OVER again. Gah! Drive me crazy to do that.

Now, everyone get out there and READ! Read like you've never seen a story before in your life... well, maybe not, but still read stuff.

Dragonfree
14th February 2006, 11:31 PM
(About Wonka, I really think we should go by the book, and unless I'm seriously misremembering something, all the kids did get sent home alive and well... I've never seen the original movie, but if Wonka was portrayed to have killed all the kids, it's a very different image of him than what I got from the book.)

But yeah, anyway... a couple of random tips...

Romance, the way somebody who doesn't like romance sees it
- Arguing all the time is the most overused shipping hint ever, and we're all dead tired of it. Not EVERY DAMN PERSON IN THE WORLD is in that much denial when they get a crush.
- I've never once met a person who ended up married to the person they had a crush on at ten. Ever. For that matter, I've never met a ten-year-old with a boyfriend/girlfriend at all. When dealing with kids' crushes, be reasonable. "Twu wub" does not suddenly surface between random ten-year-olds who start traveling together for no reason.

Mary-Sues
- Don't think in good points and flaws. Think in personalities. What is "good" and what is "bad" in a character is relative anyway. I've known my best friend for more than nine years, and I've yet to find anything in her personality that could be classified as a "flaw". Real people don't have "flaws". They have whole personalities which will cause them to react in different ways to situations. Make it all fit together. Make the personality sound reasonable with respect to the character's background, whether the background is actually revealed to readers or not.
- There is nothing wrong with writing about the one kid who happens to win the Pokémon League of the year you're writing about. Nothing wrong at all. There's nothing wrong with writing about the one person who happens to catch a shiny Charmander, either, or the one person who was having a Gym battle when Team Rocket attacked the city and kidnapped the Gym leader and the challenger. If somebody wins the Pokémon league, catches a shiny Charmander or is kidnapped by Team Rocket at all, you might as well write about the person that does happen to. But if the character both wins the Pokémon league, catches a shiny Charmander and is kidnapped by Team Rocket, you might start to consider that it is highly unlikely any one person has ever had a journey that eventful. Of course, this does not apply if there is some sort of direct cause/effect relationship between the events, e.g. if Team Rocket actually kidnapped your trainer exactly because he had a shiny Charmander rather than in a random assault and then fed the Charmander illegal stat-boosting drugs and Rare Candies before the trainer finally managed to get his Pokémon back which then helped him win the Pokémon League. Yeah, I know I'm being slightly hypocritical here. Bear with me; I didn't know anything about writing when I made the mess that is the first half of The Quest for the Legends.

FlamingRuby
15th February 2006, 12:00 AM
Attention please: This class of Variety Show Fics 101 is now is session.

Today's topic: Possible act ideas, part 1

So, your variety show fic is going great...you have a name, a number of seasons you plan to write, and a good cast (each with their own job), What next?

Stuck on what you want to feature in your show, you say? Here's some suggestions:

A. COMIC ROUTINE/MONOLOGUE

Your host my plan to do a comedy routine or do a comic monologue, and it works great at the beginning or ending of a show (or both!) One thing to be mindful of: if your jokes are boring, no one will laugh.

Solution: Go through some joke books or look for funny jokes online. Remember, if a joke doesn't make you laugh, it probably won't be funny to your audience.

B. ACTING

Acting is closely related to comic routines in that it makes the audience laugh. Wonder why everyone loves a movie you find stupid? Parody a scene from that movie with your cast. Did you find that new TV show your friend told you about boring? Parody it! Or write your own scripts!

One word of caution when doing parodies: research whatever you plan to parody first. That'll save you headaches later

Dilasc
15th February 2006, 5:53 AM
Here's another tip. Review a fic after you read it. It's not only common courtesy, and it might get you a review for your fic as well. Try to be helpful in your review though, don't just do so and say nothing so you can mooch reviews. It is not a guarantee, but its much more likely. Trust me on this. I don't know about others but I consider perhaps reading and reviewing fics of anyone who takes the time to read and review mine. Not that it happens often, but that's another story.

So... next time you read a fic, it only takes maybe ten minutes or not even, of your time to reply to someone's work. Is it truly so difficult to do as to leave a review? You save many tears of self depricating hatred from theauthor you review, and they may write more, and they may write better! Think on it, it is perhaps the second most important tip you can get, other than to go read fics, for these two work best hand in hand.

Lady Barbara
18th February 2006, 4:40 AM
Backtracking a bit to villainy: I like the notion of villains who aren't actually evil. Molly Hale was used as an example. She is simply a scared, lonely little girl but when she begins unleashing the Unown's psychic energy, she creates a dreamworld for herself. Her concept of reality is distorted, much like a funhouse mirror.

Also consider Lawrence III. He describes himself as a collector. He sees the destruction he's causing from his airship but cares only about completing his collection of legendaries. That is sociopathy.

Clockworkz
18th February 2006, 5:17 AM
Poets:
Your poems do NOT need to rhyme! To make a truely meaningful poem, just write what you feel. Here; I'm going to make this up as I go along:

The moonlit sky smiled down upon me
As My fingers tap away at the keyboard
I feel calm, as serenity
Washes over me, like a heavenly aura
And I find peace within my soul
While tapping away at a keyboard.

See? I typed what I felt. Convieniant breaks in the lines leave a lot up to the reader. Reiteration of the second and last lines are to express more fully what I am doing, and that specific action seems abit odd, especially to bring me peace. Similies and metaphors are a must. Literary devices should be used to their fullest potential. Don't skimp!

FlamingRuby
18th February 2006, 4:17 PM
Attention please...this lesson of Variety Show Fics 101 is now in session...

Let's continue our look at some possible acts you may include in your show:

C. MUSIC

Most everyone loves a song or two in a variety show, and there are infinitely many ways to include a song in a show.

You may have a single performer (that may or may not play an instrument in addition to singing), a group of singers, or a group of singers and a band. The ultimate choice is yours, so choose a grouping that suits you best.

Another thing to remember is if your show has a theme, pick a song appropriate to the theme.

Nylf
18th February 2006, 9:58 PM
To continue the music point:

Although a lot of people like music in fics, not everyone does. So, make it that the song doesn't become the focus unless the fic is a songfic.

What am I talking about? I'll explain further.

I'll use my example. In my (now pruned by time) AAML, in Chapter Four Ash and Misty are at a dance(gasps!). So obviously I needed songs. So I did as FlamingRuby advised, and found songs songs that fitted the mood. Namely Pokeshippy stuff. And ones I like from the first movies.

Now then I used these songs for a specfic reason, I wanted these songs to inspire emotions in Ash and Misty at the dance, and bring back memories so I got some nice flash-back moments(the songs are being played in fic). So I had two options, stick the songs in and then make the audience work it out, or do the thing that suits everyone.

I did the latter, c + pd the song, then wrote a detailed after paragraph describing EVERYTHING that was happening in the song and how it was affecting Ash and Misty. Now someone who dislikes reading songs can quite cheerily skip the song(which I put in italics to make clearer), and still know precisely what's going on.

This tip mainly serves for fics with a wide audience. Not variety show fics or songfics, because you have to use them more focused. But if you're using a song for a nice change of pace, put in an after paragraph that gives a detailed summary of all events. That way every reader can enjoy it, those who like music and those who don't.

Don't isolate audience members either. If you have a wide audience with good reviews, make sure to not suddenly chage to a focused audience. Like don't start off an Original Trainer then switch into mass gore then into Star Wars. Plot twists are good, but don't overdo them. Too many too quickly ruins a good story.

Da' dude
19th February 2006, 5:14 AM
Well, this feels a bit awkward, but does anyone know how to make battles more realistic? Any tips at all?

Clockworkz
19th February 2006, 5:23 AM
Sure do! Make the battles in real time. Not just, ""Pikachu! Use your thunderbolt!" Pikachu reared back, and with a clap of thunder, the Weezing was shocked with a firece lightning attack. "Weezing! Are you gonna take that? Retaliate with some sludge!"" No. Don't do that. Try to make the Pokemon act on their own instincts, as they're obviously smart enough to think for themselves. Try this: ""Charmander! Charge at it! Then dodge! Flank it on its left!" The orange lizard charged at the Zangoose, with all it's might, and its foe lunged at him for a counter-strike, but all it hit was air, and the next thing it knew, the Zangoose was Slashed in the side. "Zangoose... Don't let him bully you around!" The Zangoose pulled itself together, and slashed at the Charmander, but still got nothing. The lizard kept moving backwards, for it had the space to; the forest wasn't for another few yards." Have them act natural, and take the environment and weather conditions into effect. Also, try using tried and true strategums used on battlefields, such as camoflauge, or higher ground.

Da' dude
19th February 2006, 4:12 PM
Sure do! Make the battles in real time. Not just, ""Pikachu! Use your thunderbolt!" Pikachu reared back, and with a clap of thunder, the Weezing was shocked with a firece lightning attack. "Weezing! Are you gonna take that? Retaliate with some sludge!"" No. Don't do that. Try to make the Pokemon act on their own instincts, as they're obviously smart enough to think for themselves. Try this: ""Charmander! Charge at it! Then dodge! Flank it on its left!" The orange lizard charged at the Zangoose, with all it's might, and its foe lunged at him for a counter-strike, but all it hit was air, and the next thing it knew, the Zangoose was Slashed in the side. "Zangoose... Don't let him bully you around!" The Zangoose pulled itself together, and slashed at the Charmander, but still got nothing. The lizard kept moving backwards, for it had the space to; the forest wasn't for another few yards." Have them act natural, and take the environment and weather conditions into effect. Also, try using tried and true strategums used on battlefields, such as camoflauge, or higher ground.

I see...but let's say it's a trainerless battle? Like wild Poke against wild Poke?

Ledian_X
19th February 2006, 7:18 PM
We interupt this fascinating debate about pokemon fics to bring you another lesson from your friendly neighborhood ledian. Today I'm going to go in depth about superpowers. I notice some fics like mine, whit's and pisces_beedrill have characters with superpowers. I've decided to go in depth with this so, let's get those notebooks out.

In general, you can have as many superpowers as you want but you don't want to make them like Gary/Mary Sue. Then again look at Superman and all his powers: invulnerability, flight, x-ray vision, heat vision, superspeed, superstrength, freezing breath, super hearing etc. And that's just Post-Crisis Superman!

Superpowers can be good for characters but you also need to have something more. Yes you can use powers another character has but you need to make them different in personality. Case in point: Angel of the X-Men has a different personality than Mateo in my story despite them both having wings. Angel's a blonde billionaire from Long Island while Mateo grew up in the Southwest US and is of Mexican heritage.

The point is though, you shouldn't rip off characters' powers and personalities together. That gets annoying. You also need to have characters deal with their powers, too. You can't say "Oh I can bend steel now. Wow." The character needs to be introspective about their powers and react in a realistic way.

Also, it's a good idea to not limit yourself when it comes to powers. Don't go for just Earth, Fire, Wind and Water. That doesn't always work. Sure the Fantastic Four have those types of abilities BUT there isn't large groups of Earth, Fire, Wind and Water heroes.

Marvel has a few fire based characters but their degrees of flame vary from person to person. The most powerful with fire was Nova, A former herald of Galactus. After her was the Human Torch and it goes down the line to Pyro from the Brotherhood of Evil Mutants.

You can have characters with similar powers on a team. But, try to keep them seperate in terms of degrees of their powers. Just remember that not all superpowers come in earth, fire, wind and water. Look at my story and you'll see these examples:

bio electricity, flight, fire, superstrength, energy blasts, psionic powers, sonic scream etc.

The point is to keep them different. People don't like reading stories with people with earth, fire, wind and water powers all the time. That's why you see so many heroes with different powers that aren't the classic elements.

How they get these powers is up to you. But, the best bet would be to not have people bitten by radioactive animals. It worked with Spider-Man and that was it. You can still be born with the powers, government experimented on you or whatever. But, don't copy another hero's origin. Do research into powers and origns of them..

Heavy hitters. You can have characters with cosmic powers like the Silver Surfer and not make them like uber. Silver Surfer while cosmic tends to be philosophical in the use of his powers. He doesn't just say "Okay I am going to stop the bad guys!" No. He's more like. "If I help these people stop this threat..I hope that I recieve redemption from them after my time with Galactus."

Even if Silver Surfer's cosmic, you need to make him humanized at the same time.

If anyone has questions about Action, Adventure, Scifi, Romance and superhero stories, let me know and I'll answer here. Also, if anyone has questions about what I said, please ask.

LX

Lady Barbara
19th February 2006, 11:24 PM
I see...but let's say it's a trainerless battle? Like wild Poke against wild Poke?
Do the same thing: describe the battle. Ever watched the Discovery Channel and seen two animals fighting? Don't just tell us the attacks; tell us what they do, and what the aftereffects are.

What would happen if a wild Pikachu discovered a wild Sandshrew? Would they sniff each other? Talk and try to communicate (by talk I mean, "Pi-pika-chu" and the like)? They might even avoid each other completely.

Da' dude
20th February 2006, 3:54 AM
Do the same thing: describe the battle. Ever watched the Discovery Channel and seen two animals fighting? Don't just tell us the attacks; tell us what they do, and what the aftereffects are.

What would happen if a wild Pikachu discovered a wild Sandshrew? Would they sniff each other? Talk and try to communicate (by talk I mean, "Pi-pika-chu" and the like)? They might even avoid each other completely.

I see, except in this case you wouldn't name attacks, (because they aren't trainers), You'd describe them in a sense...

Da' dude
20th February 2006, 4:43 PM
I see, except in this case you wouldn't name attacks, (because they aren't trainers), You'd describe them in a sense...

Just to make sure we don't have anyone confused on this matter, perhaps we should include "battles" as a category that people can tutor...for the less experienced...any thoughts on this? If you guys think it's a good idea, I'll include it.