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Zephyr Flare
26th January 2004, 12:00 AM
Thankfully I still had a copy of this. I claim no ownership to this information except the part I did type. Originally posted at Pojo's back when the fanfictions existed.

This thread may be used for general advice to future writers. However, make sure what you ask would not be more suitable for the Author’s Cafe if you wish to ask a fanfiction or writting related question. This was not here when I orignally posted it :)

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THE BASICS

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As I have read the various works posted on this board, I have noticed many of the same problems over and over. Here are some general guidelines to follow when writing your fics:

1) Proper Use of the Keyboard.
There are several useful keys on the keyboard:

Enter/Return: This is one of the most useful keys. Use it whenever you have finished with one idea and are ready to move on to the next paragraph. Use it when one person has finished speaking, and another is about to start. When doing so, hit it twice, to produce a blank line between paragraphs. This makes it a lot easier for your readers to tell where your paragraphs start and end. Large blocks of uninterrupted text are hard to read.

Shift: Another important key. Hold it down when typing the first letter of a sentence, the first letter of a name, or the letter 'I' when using it as the first person singular subject pronoun.

Caps Lock: Often used as a substitute for the 'Shift' key. Don't do it. Text should not be in all capital letters unless someone is SHOUTING!

The Spacebar: Hit it once after every word or comma, twice after a period.

Tab: Unfortunately, this does not work to indent paragraphs on these boards. This is why a blank line between paragraphs is essential.

Other Keys: Your keyboard, unless it is defective, comes with a full complement of letters. Don't be afraid to use them. There is no reason to type 'u' instead of 'you', or indeed to use any abbreviation you learned in a chat room. There is no penalty for taking a few seconds longer to type complete words.

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2) Tips on Composition.

Paragraphs: Use these as your basic unit of composition. Each paragraph should be used to set forth a single idea. If a paragraph seems to long, it probably contains multiple ideas, and should be split up for clarity. If it seems too short, expand on the idea.

Sentences: A sentence should contain exactly one action or statement of existence. If it contains more than one, split it into two or more. If it contains less than one, finish the sentence. Run-on sentences are often confusing, while fragments make the reader feel that something is missing.

Description: Make sure that your reader can visualize what is happening. Don't just say something like "Joe walked along enjoying the scenery". This gives no indication of whether the scenery he is enjoying is a redwood forest, a beach at sunset, or the Grand Canyon.

A description is not just a list of attributes. When describing a character, don't just list their name, age, height, weight, hair colour, and current pokemon team. Bring this information out gradually when the person appears in a story.

Don't have Joe meet a trainer named Fred who is 12 years old, has green eyes and red hair, is three and a half feet tall, and whose pokemon are squirtle, pikachu, butterfree, grimer, tauros, and krabby. Have Joe see a short, red-haired kid with startlingly green eyes, and talk to him. Have names mentioned early in the conversation. The pokemon may be either revealed in a battle, or introduced individually during the conversation.

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3) Other General Advice

Plot: Try to be original. "Joe is 10 (or 11 or 12) years old and about to start his pokemon journey. He goes to Professor (insert tree here) and gets a (insert pokemon here)" has been done too many times already. "Joe is a 10-year-old from Pallet Town and about to start his pokemon journey. He accidentally sleeps in, and by the time he gets to Professor Oak's lab, all the starters have been taken, so he gets a Pikachu" is so old everyone is sick of it.

Try to be reasonable. A new trainer is not going to start with a legendary, or even rare, pokemon. The standard starter pokemon were selected for a reason: They are easy for professors to obtain whenever new trainers are about to start, they can be controlled by beginners, and with proper training, they can become quite powerful.

Likewise, it is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to catch any of the legendary pokemon. They are simply too powerful. If you have seen either of the movies, think about it. Mew or Mewtwo can deflect any attack you try with minimal effort.

Consider the scene in The Power of One where Ash's Pikachu (which has been known to defeat rock and ground types) meets Zapdos. Compare their relative power levels. Now think about how hard it would be to defeat Zapdos. This can be applied to any of the legendary pokemon. No trainer will have one unless it has a good reason to want to accompany that trainer.

Characters: Make your characters real. Give them strengths and weaknesses. Inherently superior trainers who win each battle effortlessly are boring. So are incompetent members of Team Rocket. So is the gym-leader-who-can't-stand-being-defeated. The stock "Rival" character is also getting old.

Whatever you do, don't just refer to people by labels from the GameBoy games (Rocket, Cooltrainer, Lass, Bug Catcher, etc). Remember that these are real people you are working with.

Spelling/Grammar: Write your story in a word-processing program. Use the spellchecker, but don't depend on it completely. It can tell whether your word matches the spelling of a real word, but it cannot tell whether it is the word you wanted to use.

Use grammar checkers with extreme care. They cannot actually understand what you are saying, and often make mistakes.

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4) My Personal Advice:

Note that the contents of this section reflect my personal preferences. Other good writers may disagree with me.

Battles: I generally dislike sentences of the form "(pokemon species) used (name of attack)". You are describing what the pokemon does. In a real-world battle, the pokemon would not "use Bite on" its opponent; it would "bite" its opponent. There are, however, exceptions to this. If there is no verb for the action, go ahead and say "Bulbasaur used Leech Seed". Still, try to avoid "used (name of attack)". Better options would be "fired a hyperbeam at (enemy)", "hit (enemy) with (attack)", etc.

Additionally; the GameBoy battle format makes no sense in the context of a real battle. A pokemon in a real battle would not just attack, then stand there waiting for its opponent to attack. In a real battle, you would have no time to go in and administer a potion or antidote to your pokemon. Watch the TV show for a reasonable depiction of what battles would be like.

GameBoy Terminology in general: Try to avoid it. In the real world, referring to something as "Level 17" is meaningless. Pokemon have varying levels of power and experience, but don't just summarize all of this with a single number. In the world of your fanfic, pokemon are real, living creatures. They are individuals. They have their own strengths, weaknesses, and skills.

The only thing worse than referring to "levels" is referring to "hit points", "power points", or any of the "statistics" (attack, defence, "special defence", etc). Avoid use of these terms at all costs.

-Original text by Murgatroyd

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CHARACTERS

Characters are fun, aren’t they?

The characters of a story determine much of whether or not the story is likeable. If a story has a killer plot, but has unbelievable characters, chances are that it’ll fall. People like to be able to connect with the characters they read about. It’s what keeps them tied into the story. Most people feel that they need to know what happens to the characters. If they die, if they succeed in their quest, etc.

Character development doesn’t always have to be deep, but readers definitely appreciate a good character. How about some tips…

-Unbelievable Strength

Don’t make a character unbelievably strong. If you have a normal kid, he acts and reacts like a normal kid would. You can’t have a normal kid get shot and get over it in half an hour. A normal kid isn’t going to forget a bullet wound… If the kid is even conscious.
This is true with trainers, too. They cannot have an unbelievably strong amount of power. If you have a story about a kid, it usually doesn’t work if the kid has eight legendaries.

-Believable Strength

It is quite possible to have a strong character. Sometimes the strength can be attributed to special powers, if you work with fantasy. These are the easiest to deal with, perhaps because they can be there because they were inane.

With ‘real people’ in fics, this can be somewhat hard. There can be characters who have unbending will to go on, or even derive pleasure from pain (Anyone seems “Tomorrow Never Dies”? Stamper is a prime example of this…). To make a character like this believable, the characteristics must be hard and strong.

As an example… Salvador is a strong guy with a hard will to continue. He never fails to work hard, especially when it is for his work (he works for the Rockets). He is willing to take any and all pain necessary on the way to achieving his goals. Throughout the story, Salvador has sustained minor injuries, and kept his strong will. When he is faced with an agent of another Team, however, he will sustain a much larger one…

"Salvador narrowed his eyes in concentration, debating whether or not he should leap forward and attack or not. There were certainly other alternatives. He could try to throw his empty gun at the man. He could hold back for a few moments, though it would most likely lead to being shot.

After a moment, Salvador decided that he could take it no more. His way of doing something was to go ahead and do it. He wasn’t going to change that because a guy had a gun at his head. If he was killed, that was it. He wanted to go down fighting.

He leapt forward with a speed that surprised him, but, unfortunately, failed to surprise the dark man. Even as Salvador lunged forward, reaching for the man, he could hear the gun being fired. Salvador felt the dark man step back, and then felt the force of the bullet piercing into his chest.

He cringed in agony, almost screamed. He felt bones shatter around his organs, felt a bolt of heat near his lungs. For a moment he tottered and nearly fell to the floor. However, he was able to hear his earlier thoughts, those that had stated that he didn’t need to worry about being killed. These thoughts kept him standing.
Salvador saw the form of the man in front of him. Though it was becoming blurry, he knew he could attack, maybe even hit. Maybe he was going to die, but he didn’t care. Once more, Salvador lunged forward."

Of course, a character doesn’t need to be strong all the way through to have moments of strength. A person can definitely find courage during a traumatic moment, before a possible death or the like. Strength lies deep in everyone. Depending on the character, it can be found at different levels.
The main point is, don’t make a weak suddenly character act strongly all of the time. Readers won’t swallow that too well.

-Alternate points of view

These are very useful when developing a character.
While one character is thinking about his or herself, you realize what he/she feels about the traits he/she has. A reader can also make insights about the character by what he/she thinks of others.
For example:

"Lydia knew that she didn’t like Chad very much. The truth was that she hated him, loathed him. The boy always seemed to be in some sort of trouble, whether it was because he had been caught talking one too many times in class or because he had been caught stealing from the local convenience store.

Maybe it’d be better to say that Lydia distrusted Chad. She didn’t know him very well, and didn’t want to. He seemed to be the kind of guy who would stand in a dark ally, smoking a cigarette and waiting, just waiting for some innocent bystander to walk by and…

Lydia shook her head vigorously. Of course Chad wasn’t doing that, he was too busy with homework and the cross team. Still, it was a feasible idea, one that could happen in the near future. She felt this strongly, and couldn’t shake her dislike for Chad."

In reading this from Lydia’s POV, you should be able to realize that she dislikes Chad. You can see that she distrusts him because of his actions. She seems to be stuck on certain ideas, and has a sort of prejudice towards those who seem ‘untrustworthy.’ She judges before she understand anything. You can also see that she has some sort of imagination.

To carry development even further, it’s good to write what other characters observe about their fellows. For example…

"Julia didn’t understand why Lydia always seemed to walk on the other side of the hall when Chad walked by. It was always a movement that could almost be absent-minded, a simple move to the other side. Julie didn’t think so, though. Not when it was always done.

Julia didn’t think Chad was a bad guy at all. He certainly didn’t deserve to be avoided like he was some sort of disease. Although Lydia was her friend, Julia sometimes had trouble understanding Lydia’s short-sightedness"

This further pushes the fact that Lydia doesn’t look below the surface. It also shows that she has perhaps made wrong judgment of Chad.

Obviously, you can do a better job of conveying information by using various POVs than I just did. It is a very useful technique, and I recommend it.

-Names

Name can be quite helpful in defining a character, too. A character’s name can reveal certain traits about him or her, contradict his or her traits, have a strong meaning to the story, or mean nothing at all.

Using a variety of names can be helpful. While it’s fine to use names such as ‘Rob’, ‘Jim’, and ‘Amanda’, it’s good to mix these in with less common names. I suppose this isn’t quite ‘character’ information, but it stays here because I don’t feel like putting it elsewhere.

Names such as ‘Angel’ can be used to either contradict or convey the characteristics of a character…

"Angel fit her name to a level of perfection that seemed undeniably firm. Her practical, caring behavior, along with her endless amount of forgiveness, seemed to fit nearly everyone’s idea of angelic. Her hair seemed to be spun of gold, and her body had been shaped to a soft faultlessness."

Or…

"Angel’s eyes blazed with anger as she watched the man before her. She had a short temper, and certainly wasn’t the most mild-mannered person in the world. Both Angel and the man knew that she could kill him without a second thought. For a moment, however, she simply glared, piercing eyes glaring out from under her black bangs, standing with an intensity that seemed to scream that she was a murderer."

So… I really have no way to wrap that one up.
I guess, while names can mean something, convey a characteristic, or symbolize something, it’s perfectly fine to have them be meaningless.

-Actions
A character must, obviously, stay constantly in character. By this I mean that you should make sure that if a character does something, it is befitting of him/her. It’s fine for a character to do something that SEEMS out of the ordinary… as long as you explain the reason for the actions.

For example, if you have a character who seems to be the perfect angel, you can make him/her do something ‘bad’ by a number of methods.
First, you could use a traumatic happening. Have a close death, or a near death experience.

There’s always the ‘hidden character’ method, too. The angelic personality could be a cover-up for the character… and as the writer, you don’t have to reveal this fact until you want to.
Isn’t that fun?

-Original text by Crimson Rose

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STAGES

A story goes through four different stages from beginning to end. These are as follows:

1, Exposition - this is where you introduce the main characters and let your readers know a bit about their background. Traits which should be revealed at this stage are:

Gender
Age
Appearence
Pokemon owned (for humans)
Name of trainer (for Pokemon - optional)
Unusual traits/special powers (if applicable)
Hometown

Other traits should be revealed as and when they become relevant and it's important (especially if you're writing a mystery story) not to reveal too much too soon.

Complication - this is where conflict arises. Note that this doesn't have to be a war in the literal sense - you can have conflict over a number of situations. In "The Chimera Children", the conflict was between two human/Ursaring hybrids and the organisation who wanted to eliminate them.

Lack of any real conflict is one of the main problems with writing journey fics. Even if you manage to avoid most of the pitfalls these stories contain (clichéd starts, too little description, lack of realism etc) describing Gym battle after Gym battle can get repetitive after the first few. And, when journey fics DO contain conflict, this usually comes in the form of a rivalry between two trainers or the need to foil Team Rocket, both of which have been used in the games and tv series.

As a final note, if you're writing a short story, make the conflict something, which is straight forward and easily, resolved.

3, Climax - this is it, folks! The final showdown! The conflict has reached its peak and now's the time where things could go either way. You need to build towards your climax gradually and one way to do this is by dropping subtle hints throughout your fic, a process known as foreshadowing.

Whether you include an actual battle in your climax depends on the nature of the story. You also need to be as dramatic as you can at this stage; ending your penultimate chapter with a statement like:

"Lisa and John clung to each other nervously and Growlithe snarled threateningly as the door opened"

is especially effective as it means people will need to wait until the final chapter to find out who (or what) is behind the door. You could end the story there, but, then again, finding out what's behind the door might be extremely inportant.

4, Resolution - here, the climax has passed and the characters are starting to get their lives back together again. Key questions should be answered at this stage if they aren't already and you might also want to drops hints that there may be a sequel.

Post-climax, your characters will more than likely be changed by their experiences and you need to reflect this in your ending. You can have them just go home and try to get on with their lives, but your plot might require that they make a new start somewhere else. But, whatever you do, don't waffle on about each character's subsequent life history unless it's absolutely essential. Even then, it might work better in a sequel.

-Original text by Clare

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I thought of a few people may find useful waaaay back.


3rd person

Imagine you are there in the written work but your unseeable to the characters, an invisible entity if you will. You still have your senses but no touch.

I apologise for using this Punchiemon but you gave me the idea and it works J In his Digimon fic Time and Time again, Eaglemon was getting electrocuted. You can enforce this with something like this.

''The intoxicating aroma of singed feathers filled the room.''

It gives more depth while not becoming too wordy for a reader. It is a little basic by my standards now however but it gives a reader something to envision.

Said, Said Said etc. It's boring! What emotions does it convey? Nothing at all.

Although you aren't the current speaker in the written work, they very rarely are stone cold and no different happy or sad in real life are they?

People will show their emotions by their face, their body language or the way they speak. This can make a character more believable and more real over some poor image randomly slapped into a world that he or she has no connection with.

Something like explained, shouted are a good example though said quietly and said thoughtfully is also perfectly acceptable.


1st person

It is best to use if you feel yourself as that person or Pokemon depending on what you're writing. If you are nothing a like, you may find your character losing touch with reality.

Take my first fanfiction Sandra and Chargon for example. I find myself very much alike her. Ok my name isn't Sandra, no really it isn’t J You are seeing me as I am. I do have a temper problem. I can be rather evil and merciless. This helps me write it easier because I know whom I'm dealing with.

However, In Search of a Sister which was dropped a few years ago now, Lisa the main character and I are very different causing a conflict between writing about somebody I do not fully understand. This can show in your writing so it is something to watch for.


Proof Reading

I hate it as much as anyone but as much as I hate to admit it, it does help. Spell checkers cannot spot words that are spelt right but are not what you want.

Get another person to skit through your writing as they may find mistakes that you have missed or require a section explaining which of course you do not want.

Do also read though yourself though because any one can make mistakes or thought type like I have many times in the past.


World Fluff

Possibly something I am a little more infamous for as it seriously annoys the heck out of me. Reality is not pink; sugar coated and has helpful pixies dancing in hula skirts. A world is never perfect and a character is never perfect. Learn to draw on corruption and backgrounds to help give your world a sense of depth for a reader to identify with.

By all means make a humour that has a go at these perfect worlds of Mary Sues, there is no reason either why your fanfiction can’t be sugar fluff. Just remember too much sugar rots yer teeth, too much sugar fluff rots your fanfiction.

By: Me quite a few years ago now

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This is a piece I did on Pojo's board (most of you will know me as Clare over there) about a year ago and it basically outlines the types of endings that are (as a rule) best avoided:

1, "And they all lived happily ever after" - you might have got away with this when you were younger, but you should by now realise that real life isn't like that. Have your characters marry by all means, but remember that people nowadays tend to like realism in their fanfics.

2, Main character becomes a Pokemon master - this ending is most commonly associated with journey fics, but they seldom get that far. Also, if you have a character reach this status for no apparent reason, you'll probably send people's Mary-Sue radar into overdrive.

3, Characters (human and Pokemon) walk off into the sunset - Cliché! Cliché! Cliché! If you want to end with them moving on to something else (to be explored in a sequel) give an indication of what this might be in the final chapter.

4, "It was all a dream" - translated, this generally means "I haven't got the imagination to come up with a convincing ending". Many people dislike stories that end like this because it basically makes them feel cheated, so only use it if there's no other way of resolving things.

5, Excessive waffle - your readers don't need to know ALL that happened to your characters once they reached their goal. Stick to whatever is relevant to the story at hand.

6, Cliffhangers you have no intention of resolving - there's only one word to describe these . . . irritating. If you must have a cliffhanger, I'd advise you to start planning a sequel to let your readers know how, say, Johnny survived after falling off his Charizard's back while they were 100 feet up in the air. And make sure cliffhangers are resolved in a realistic way; don't suddenly give your character magical powers unless you plan to make this a central part of the sequel.

7, An anti-climax - picture the scene: you're reading what looks like being the most exciting fanfic ever, only to find that the author gives it the lamest ending you can imagine. Don't insult your readers' intelligence by ending a fic with a phrase like "It was an Eevee" when you've led people to expect a really powerful Pokemon, possibly even a Legendary. Of course, doing this for humorous purposes is another matter . . .

8, Killing off all the characters - this could be seen as a cop-out designed to avoid the hassle of writing a sequel. If you must kill characters off, make sure the deaths advance the plot in some way. But don't kill characters just because you've come to dislike them; think of some other way to write them out of the story if you really want to get rid of them.

Keep in mind that these are just general guidelines - there are no "hard-and-fast" rules when it comes to writing stories.

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Description comes in many forms and there are various tricks you can use to convey what is happening to your readers:

1, Adjectives - these are words that tell people what something looks, feels, sounds, smells or tastes like. In theory, you can have a story without any adjectives, but it would seem rather bland and offer little more than a basic outline of the scene. Take this as an example:

"Jessica shook back her hair"

OK, maybe Jessica's hair colour isn't important in this instance, but let's, for argument's sake, say that it is. And, again for the sake of argument, let's say she has dark hair:

"Jessica shook back her dark hair"

Or, to take it a stage further:

"Jessica shook back her lustrous raven black hair"

If you ever need help coming up with suitable adjectives, a good Thesaurus might come in handy. Just be careful to make sure that the adjective you choose conveys the meaning you intended: for example "cute" and "beautiful" both mean something that is attractive, but "cute" tends to mean it is attractive in a childlike way.

2, Synonyms for said - not strictly description, but using words such as "exclaimed", "retorted", "muttered", "commented" and so forth is a useful tool if you want to convey a character's tone of voice. The use of "said" combined with an appropriate adverb can also help here, as can describing a characters body language. For example, if the character is impatient, he or she will probably be fidgeting, checking his or watch or doing any one of the various displacements actions people engage in at such moments.

But don't be afraid to use the word "said" on its own without any qualification if it's appropriate to the situation.

3, Metaphors and similes - these are words that compare something to something else, the difference between them being that a simile simply says that something reminds the author of something else (eg, "as cunning as a Vulpix"), whereas a metaphor suggests that the two things are more or less one and the same. For example:

"Mark is a bit of a Gyarados"

does not mean that Mark is literally a Gyarados (or even a human/Gyarados hybrid). Rather, it suggests that he has something in common with Gyarados such as a quick temper.

4, Onomatopeia - can't remember the exact spelling and I don't have a dictionary to hand so I can't look it up. Anyway, this is a very important tool for creating sound effects - try saying words like "click", "hum", "rattle", "yawn" and so forth out loud and notice how the pronunciation imitates the sound they represent. If we take the sentence:

"The trees swayed restlessly in the breeze"

as an example, notice how the word "restlessly" sounds remarkably like the sound of rustling leaves. In any case, doing this kind of thing can help add atmosphere to your writing as it enables people to "hear" what your characters are hearing. This is one of the more advanced forms of description, but I'm sure you can think of a few examples of words being used to convey sound.

By: Clare


There isn't much advice that I can give other than to write from your heart. Having your own style is everything. Whether you be a fan of the games (like me), the anime, or if you have your own idea of the Pokemon world, write what you feel is best, within reason.

Read other well-established fanfics, that is how I got my inspiration. Try to take criticism as a chance to improve, there are a lot of people here that know what a fanfic should be. Keep this in mind and you will enjoy your writing experience.

By: Jukain


Feel free to add your own comments or suggestions.

Aquapolis V
7th February 2004, 6:55 AM
Sorry, But I Have A Slight Objection To Your Legendary Pokemon Item.
In My Upcoming Fic, The Main Characters Second Pokemon Is A Celebi. She Captures It After Saving It From A Team In The Nearby Forest.

Although I Realize and understand That Having About 6 Legendarys Is A Little Unrealistic, Also Anything Can Happen In A Story And Not All Legendary Pokemon Are Unbelieveably Strong Like That Image Of A Legendary Pokemon.
In My Fic, This Celebis Power Is About The Equivalent Of A Level 30 Wartortle In The Games.

So I Think You Can Include Legendarys In Your Fic, But Under Reasonable Storylines.
i,e. Not All Legendarys Have To Be THe Unbelieveably Strong Image.
Thankyou.

Murgatroyd
7th February 2004, 8:31 AM
Ah, the immortal rant returns. It never ceases to amaze me how popular it's been over the last 3 years.

Aquapolis: You'll note that I didn't forbid it entirely. (At the same time I first wrote this rant, I was also working on a fic where the main character ended up being accompanied by a Mew.) However, I do advise caution. It is far too easy to let a character with a legendary pokemon get out of control. I know this from personal experience, both with a great many fics I've read and one I tried to write.

Andrew
14th February 2004, 7:16 AM
Here's also a tip, these pokemon are extremely overused: Dratini, Larvitar, Pikachu, the starters, Eevee. Because of the flooding of many fics with those Pokemon repeatedly, it can be overlooked because of a common starter.

Going with something a bit offbeat (Ie, A Drowzee over an Abra) is sometimes always better. And give your Pokemon a personality, a little more than just "AND MY HERACROSS LOVED SAP! LOLS!" More perhaps, "Heracross gave a downward cast, it could tell winter was near, and many of the great trees he fed on, were going to die, with that he continued on stockpiling for the cold season".

Also, if you capture a pokemon in your fic, why would it instantly obey you? Think of it as like when you get a new pet, will it instantly obey? Nope.

Legendaries, don't have your characters capture them, its hokey :| And don't have your characters "OMFG ZAPADOS! AND SO I THROUGH A BALL AND IT WAS CATCHED! THEN IT BLASTED OFF TeAM ROCKET!"

And my final point, overuse of Team Rocket. Unless you're adding a new dimension to Team Rocket, don't have them. But think about things realistically, do you really think there would be an underground crime synicate? If you're going to have a big baddie, have something like a corrupt branch of the Government, or a senile old newspaper editor making up Team Rocket to sell papers. And do you really think they'd send teams around reciting lameo mottos and being "Blasted off" ? I think not.

Ktnxbai! :)

Clare
19th February 2004, 5:25 PM
You will also need a setting for your story. If you want, you can use the towns and cities featured in the games and/or tv series, but you could also invent places of your own. If you go down this route, try to resist the urge to write long gazetteer-style descriptions and only include enough information to let people know what your, say, city is like. You are writing a story, not a tour guide - so keep any descriptions of your setting relevent to the storyline.

Also, whether you are using your own places or the ones from canon, there would be a lot more to them than just a Pokemon Centre, Mart, Gym and any of the other buildings you may have explored in the games. If these places existed in real life, they would have people living in them and interacting - they wouldn't just be stopping-off points on someone's Pokemon journey.

FlamingRuby
19th February 2004, 10:48 PM
You can also use some of the "other" Pokemon games (examples: TCG, Puzzle League/Challenge, Snap, Stadium) as inspiration for a story too. For example, my own story, "The Heart of the Cards" was inspired by the Game Boy TCG.

To sum it up, you're not limited to the "color" games....

MachopGirl
24th February 2004, 9:36 PM
There isn't much advice that I can give other than what Feather Dancer and the others put, and to write from your heart. Having your own style is everything. Whether you be a fan of the games (like me), the anime, or if you have your own idea of the pokemon world, write what you feel is best, within reason. Read other well established fanfics, that is how I got my inspiration. Try to take criticism as a chance to improve, there are a lot of people here that know what a fanfic should be. Keep this in mind and you will enjoy your writing experience.
You're so, right! I too have my own idea of the Pokémon world. It totally bugs me when some people give me half-*****ed remarks like "Pikachu should lay eggs, not give birth!" People have totally different views about Pokémon so don't question about them and appreciate their creativity.

Although it's somewhat rarely used, take my advice. Avoid the use of Stereotypes! It really bugs me when some authors use them. Something like dumb blondes or loser nerds are getting VERY dull and boring! Break the mold and think outside the box.

Examples of stereotyping in Pokémon fics;

Cute girls always using cute Pokémon like Jigglypuff: Don't do that. Not all "cute" girls use "cute" Pokémon! They too have personalities like any other character in general. Perhaps that cute girl have an interest in bug so give her Bug-types. Or maybe she have a tomboyish demeanor so give her Fighting Pokémon or any vicious ones like Ursaring. Got the idea?

Fighting Pokémon portrayed as stupid and brainless: Ah yes, the overused "Big muscles, small brains" stereotype. That's another no-no! Fighting takes a lot of brains and strategy in order to succeed. Don't simply assume that a Machoke is stupid just simply because he/she have big muscles.

Dark Pokémon used by evil characters: Another no-no! Dark Pokémon do NOT have to be evil and vicious or be used by evil characters. In a fanfic of mine, I have Sakura use an Absol and she's not evil. Being a Dark-type does NOT mean bad or evil.

Got the idea? Again, break the mold and think outside the box.

The Big Al
24th February 2004, 10:43 PM
Don't be afraid to make you're own Pokemon. The 386 Pokemon are just a fraction of the possible Pokemon that could exist. It also allows to be creative. Develope new type mixs and maybe dabble with types you come up with yourself.
Make sure you describe this new Pokemon though. So that we no what it looks like and all. Let your imagination create the Pokemon. However, be reasonable as well.

Clare
25th February 2004, 5:45 PM
On the subject of making up your own Pokemon, a guy called FossilMagikarp wrote an article on this subject a while back. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to locate a copy so I'll just have to do the best I can.

When inventing a non-canon Pokemon, one of the first things you need to consider is whether or not you need to have it in your story. FossilMagikarp (or Fossie as he was known) suggested that you only invent Pokemon if the storyline you're writing requires it. At the time of writing the article, he was writing a story about prehistoric Pokemon and invented a few of his own in addition to the five then available - this was before Anorith/Armaldo and Lileep/Cradily were around. Of course, it's entirely up to you whether you invent Pokemon or not; I'm just stating what Fossie said.

Anyway, once you've established a need for a new Pokemon, the first thing you need to do is work out what sort of creature it should be based on. This will sometimes be an important factor in determining what Type the Pokemon is - if you look at the Pokedex, you'll notice that Water Pokemon tend to be modelled on fish and other aquatic creatures, Grass Pokemon either look like plants or have plantlike characteristics . . . and so on. If there are two possible Types, think about making the Pokemon a duel Type.

Next, try to work out roughly how you want the Pokemon to look. This will included details such as size, colour and markings, any appendages (no, don't think like that! I'm talking about things like the seed on a Bulbasaur's back) and whether or not it evolves. Talking of which, you could also create a new evolution for a canon Pokemon; Eevee is especially popular in this respect, largely because all its evolutions are very anatomically similar.

Finally, your Pokemon will need a name. Look at what sort of creature it is and what characteristics it has and think about a name which will convey that information and sound right when you say it out loud. If you look at the names of the canon Pokemon, you'll notice that a lot of them are blends of words. For example, a parrot Pokemon might be called Mimacaw, from the words "mimic" (what parrots are famous for doing) and "macaw" (a type of parrot)

Thunder Pichu
29th February 2004, 2:01 PM
I've got two cents... Err... Maybe a dollar, but hey.

I see sometimes with characters, the author tends to blend them, make them closer to what he or she is like, rather than the character's real personality. Every good author finds themself goofing up like this occasionally. I mean, I find myself doing this, I notice other stories like that, too. Contagious illness, stupid mistake, or intended? O.o;

Barb
4th March 2004, 1:01 AM
Originally posted by Aphrode:
see sometimes with characters, the author tends to blend them, make them closer to what he or she is like, rather than the character's real personality. Every good author finds themself goofing up like this occasionally. I mean, I find myself doing this, I notice other stories like that, too. Contagious illness, stupid mistake, or intended? O.o;

Intended, really; that's why the main character of a novel/fanfiction is often referred to as the author's 'alter ego'. In Stephen King's "The Dark Half" the alter ego is literal: an evil person who tries to kill the author. In writing, the characters tend to take on personality or physical traits of the author. Nothing wrong with that, so long as the story doesn't become a Mary Sue/Marty Stu fic, wherein the author becomes some omnipotent being who solves everyone's problems. That's just egotism run amok.

Also understand this point: lack of reviews has absolutely no bearing on how good you are as an author. Jackie Collins sells millions of books each year; maybe someone hear could name one or two of her titles. Now who can tell me who won the Pulitzer Prize in Literature? (Jeffrey Eugenides, for "Middlesex"). His novel got far fewer printings than Collins's did, but his novel was considered far superior technically than hers.

Please don't worry about reviews or the lack thereof. Sometimes I'm not always sure what to say in a review myself but I do try to reply. Some people might want to reply when the fic is completed instead of after each chapter. If you're getting better as a writer, then people will notice eventually. Maybe not right away, but they will notice.

Sammi
6th March 2004, 3:48 AM
Wow! This thread is really a life-saver for me!
My main OC is too Mary-sue...

Here's my view on some writing stuff. Please note that this is my opinion on it; you don't have to take this as seriously as some of the other stuff. I'm not that good of an author. I just thought that maybe someone would like to hear what I have to say:
Don't let the lack of reviews get to you. You might think that you're good and therefore you think that you're going to be an instant hit. I expected that. I'm sorry to say that most likely you won't be an instant hit, and it didn't to me. (No one is instantly good at anything anyway.) People might like your fic, others may not. Some people just don't review; some people just don't like the topic you have chosen.
Trust me; I have a fanfic series of my own posted on two sites (not here though). It's not your usual journey fic; it's not even that Pokemon-oriented. It's more about characters in the anime and psychics. Yep, psychics. I'm surprised that people have read it with my Mary-sue, let alone liked it.
Anyway, the point is... one site (Fanfiction.net) I have moderate success. At least every story has a review. On the other site is a different story. The whole entire series has an amazing amount of two reviews. But I don't let it bother me. I know that at least someone has read it.

Also, enjoy what you write. Enjoy the fact that you have gotten it done, and the story is good to you. If you don't get too many reviews, at least you're happy with your work, and that's all that matters, right? That's how it is with me.

Sorry if the advice seems bad. But I just wanted to give my two cents.

Iveechan
6th March 2004, 9:27 AM
I have a little thing to add. Sometimes short fragmented sentences can heighten a tense feeling. For example, at the end of chapter 3 of "Guilty by Design", I used a few very short sentences, and when reading it over it made ME feel scared.

"...He was alone.

All alone.

There was the old tree stump with yellow fungus growing on it. Just one more turn and they'd be home. The truck stopped and the ignition turned off. A door slammed. Footsteps crunched on the road. Champ's heartbeat accelerated."

Short yet effective methinks. Of course, a fic littered with short sentences is a headache to read. Use your shorties wisely folks!

Cerapter
10th March 2004, 4:25 PM
Thanks for the advice, I needed it! ^_^
Anyway, here's my tips on writing:

*Characters*

When creating new characters I always consider their names carefully, I try to never chose a name that is completely unbelievable.
Here's some links that may help in finding names for your character:

20000 Names (http://www.20000-names.com/)
Baby Chatter (http://www.babychatter.com/)
Baby Name World (http://www.babynameworld.com/)
Baby names and meanings (http://www.baby-names-meanings.com/)
Behind the Name (http://www.behindthename.com/)

Also, when writing about pokémon, I don't automatically assume that they all come from eggs like every reptile and bird that we know.
Eevee for example in a story that I'm writing takes care of her children like my cat took care of hers.

Everyone has a life-story too, a story that shaped the character, pokémon or human.
To quote Ceres from Ayashi no Ceres when she is talking about her alter-ego:

"The "Aya" in existence now is a being that has been created over the past sixteen years.
Aya's personality was influenced by her environment, and interpersonal relationships."

Keep those words in mind when creating a character.

EX. #1:The abused and orphaned girl at the street-corner would most likely laugh at Prof. Oak rather than believe that he would give her a pokémon.

EX. #2: The spoiled girl with a single parent that isn't home much is more likely just to take the present then thanking for it unless reminded.

EX. #3: A girl who is shy is more likely found to be reading then being at the new club, unless dragged by her friends.

EX. #4: The tomboy usually is very active, and should match Ash, Ritchie and Tracey in personality and entusiasm.

Those are just a few examples, but hopefully it will give out less orphaned, "feel sorry for me" trainers that suddenly is bubbly and optimistic.
I've even read about a boy-chasing rape-victim, that's not natural.

Also, we have the Mary-Sue, Gary-Stu case.
When looking at their background I often find this:

#1: Rape, Murder, Orphan, Slave, Mistreatment, Abuse, etc.
#2: Famous, Genius, Beautiful, etc.

See a pattern? -_-;

You can make your character beautiful, it's nothing wrong with that, but don't give her the benefit of being superstar, rich, good voice, great at cooking, genius, nice, compassionate, etc.

The bad thing about the character above, is that s/he is often from background #1!

You can be a superstar, you often make a lot of money, and if you're a singer you can have a good voice too! But then you have to have some pretty bad faults to make up for it, and background #1 can't be an option unless the character has years of therapy and healing in between.

*Description*

Alright, we know that Landon is a Dragon trainer, gym-leader of Verdigris Town of Mana, holder of the Supreme Badge, is 184 cm tall, has black hair, brown eyes, dresses in blue turtle-neck and jeans.
He is very calm, and almost irritatingly so.

Now we will see an example on how he could be written:

***

Mary stepped inside the gym. A man stood across from her, he had long black hair, brown eyes, was dressed in blue turtle-neck and jeans. I am Landon of the Surpreme Badge. he said and Mary looked up at him, as he was 184 cm tall she only reached his chest.

***

@_@ Information overload! And not only that, it was just written as a block.
Plus, if you look around they are only standing in a void, nothing was put into the description of the gym.
We'll try this again:

***

Mary stepped inside the gym, her eyes darting nervously from the high ceiling to the large windows.
Her eyes locked onto a tall man standing in the middle of the huge room.
Cocking her head curiously to the side, she regarded the man carefully.

Black hair flowed messily down his back, and the blue tones of his clothes blended with the walls of the room.
He had grass-stains on his jeans, she noted dully, and that turtle-neck doesn't go with brown eyes.
The man looked in her direction suddenly, a smile on his face.
Gathering her courage, Mary spoke up.

"I've come to challenge the Verdigris Gym-leader." her neck was quite strained to look him in the eyes and not his chest.

"That would be me." the man told her in a gentle tone.

Mary didn't believe it, how could this shabby stranger be Landon?
Landon, the Dragon Master of Mana was famous, and trainers came from the whole world to earn the Supreme badge.
No one had told her that he was untidy and probably rude too.

***

Here we see that Mary is a brat, Landon isn't mysterious and we used quotation marks! Yay!
We also learn that Landon is famous, but he is one of those that would rather not be.

*Overall*

I don't say you have to write like me, in fact, I would be horrified if anyone was as bad as me! But I've read many stories and I think that I sometimes can give a few tips.
But I know places where you can get more and better tips.

The Pokémon Tower - A Pokémon Fanfiction site. (http://www.thepokemontower.com)
Flames of the Heart Fanfiction Guide - Ronin Warrior help, but takes up several things that is universal to fanfiction. (http://www.moonroses.net/fanfiction/ronin/fanguide.html)
Sakura's Senshi Circle - Even if it is mostly for Sailor Moon, some things are worth reading. (http://www.sailorastera.com)

Of course there are more, like FARP on elfwood.com and more, but the sites I've mentioned is the ones that I've checked out the most.
Flames of the Heart is especially recommended, if you can get through the Ronin terms on the site.

Well, that's all for me, hope someone found something useful, and I just realised on how long this post is going to be. ^_^;
So without further ado...

See you later,
Cerapter

Lady Dragonrider
10th March 2004, 11:31 PM
Fanfiction mods (as I assume you are somewhat experts on fanfictions), delete/ edit/ argue with this if you disagree.

I think it gets annoying/ unnecissary when you just randomly switch out English words with Japanese words. One might argue, "My characters are Japanese, so it would only make sense to have them say Japanese word". Well, if it's an English fanficiton, chances are your characters will be speaking English most of the time, so technically their dialogue is translated. It wouldn't make much sense to just tranlate some of their dialogue and not all. I think it's appropriate to use Japanese words when: the word you have in mind is a culture-related word that doesn't have a good translation (geisha, for example). the word you are thinking of is so commonly used in America/ wherever you live that it might as well become an English word (anime, bishojo, manga, etc). adding the suffix -chan to their name emphasizes how cute they are. changing the suffix of one's name signifies an important point in the story (a boy calls a girl -chan instead of -san for the first time, etc). the main character's first language is not Japanese and the person who is speaking Japanese is not supposed to be understood by most of the audience.Otherwise, doing things like using "hai" instead of "yes", "-sama" instead of "lord/ lady", or saying key phrases in Japanese that could quite easily be translated into English is distracting and puts people with less knowlege of the Japanese language than you at a disadvantage.

Of course, this does not apply to names. If you are a purist, I have no problem with you calling the kid "Satoshi" instead of "Ash" or refering to the city as "Hanada City" instead of "Cerulean City". Just don't use random Japanese words becasue you think it makes you look cool, because to be quite honest, it doesn't.

That was just my (probably unwanted) two cents.

Clare
13th March 2004, 11:52 AM
Cute girls always using cute Pokémon like Jigglypuff: Don't do that. Not all "cute" girls use "cute" Pokémon! They too have personalities like any other character in general. Perhaps that cute girl have an interest in bug so give her Bug-types. Or maybe she have a tomboyish demeanor so give her Fighting Pokémon or any vicious ones like Ursaring. Got the idea?

Conversely, there's no reason why a male character should have to have "tough" Pokemon. In the tv series, Brock had a Vulpix for a time and the episode "The Screen Actor's Guilt" featured a popular action hero who had a Smoochum. Both Pokemon fall into the "cute" category mentioned above so there's probably a strong temptation to only give them to female characters.

Anyway, your best bet when selecting Pokemon for your characters is to consider what sort of person you want them to be. Are they into tough battles or do they go for some other aspect of the Pokemon world such as contests or simply keeping Pokemon as pets? Do you want them to specialise in a particular Type? I don't know about anyone else, but the old standby of flipping through your game guide can come in useful here.

The Slowbro
31st March 2004, 4:34 AM
TO ALL FAN FIC WRITERS- DO NOT and I mean DO NOT take harsh criticism as an insult. Take it as a helping tool. No one is here to insult you. Everyone is here to help. Remember that.
---------------------
And that was my half a penny xD

Hikki Kokurabuji
1st April 2004, 8:47 AM
TO ALL FAN FIC WRITERS- DO NOT and I mean DO NOT take harsh criticism as an insult. Take it as a helping tool. No one is here to insult you. Everyone is here to help. Remember that.
---------------------
And that was my half a penny xD

For the most of the time, harsh critics can be helpful. But when people read a fanfic/story and suddenly flames it altogether with its author, it's the most disgusting thing a reader would ever do. I mean, why would they suddenly flame a story when they haven't fully read THE WHOLE STORY? Ahem, sorry for the capital letter usings, but I find that this kind of critics/comments don't help, instead they tend to ruin an author's confidence in writing or continuing any of his/her stories. That's why I don't really expect to have comments or critics, though any one of them are very welcomed.

And just a quick add-on from me:
From all types of stories, I find that a Pokemon fanfic is the most challenging of all. No, that doesn't mean that I don't write one at all. I have a Pokemon story, but then I found that its storyline wasn't as promising as some other Pokemon fanfics I have read. I could be wrong, but I feel that my writing skill stills needs improvement. I may able to write other stories, but a Pokemon fanfic demands most of my creativity and effort to be pushed to its maximum limit. Because for me, to write a good (if not perfect) Pokemon fanfic means that I have to explore deep into the Pokemon world (game/anime/etc) and try to use my creativity as much as I can in developing one storyline.

Well, I don't expect anyone to reply this post, but if one does, then I highly thank that person in advance.

Clare
1st April 2004, 3:47 PM
Personally, I feel it should be left up to the author to decide what to do with a fic that's been criticised. But don't scrap a fic just because someone's told you it's no good, especially if what's at issue is little more than a clash of tastes. For example, imagine you've written a story in which Ash and May are an item and someone who's of the "thou shalt only pair Ash with Misty" school criticises it for no other reason than the fact it's got a pairing they don't like. If the story itself falls within the rules, there's nothing that person can do to stop you posting it - so don't let them push you around. Besides, if the "review" was REALLY insulting, you do have the option of reporting it to the mods.

On the other hand, if a reviewer raises VALID criticisms of a story, it wouldn't hurt to at least consider revising it a little. I don't know about anyone else, but I find it really annoying when wannabe authors respond to perfectly reasonable advice to improve their spelling, punctuation and grammar; make their fics longer; be a little more original or realistic . . . and so on with childish comments like:


Stop insulting me! I was only doing it for fun!

Well, it's NOT fun to read a fic that's so badly written you can't make head or tail of what is happening. I write for fun too, but I also want other people to be able to read what I've written so I take my time and make sure the spelling, punctuation and grammar are reasonably accurate.

Mew King
4th April 2004, 9:39 PM
It's okay to have legendaries if you can explain them. In one of my fanfictions, I have the main character get a Rayquaza in order to stop the revived team Rocket's master plan of destruction. Also, if the legendaries are important to the storyline, then normal people can have it, in another fanfiction, I have the bad guy use a snag machine to steal the legendary Pokémon of all the trainers in the championships. The main character then has to face a team of 5 legendaries and a mutated Houndoom (Cerberus-Houndoom: winged three-headed Houndoom).

Also, don't make someone invincible. Give all of your a characters a unique weekspot. Such as in another fic of mine, the main character never looses a battle, but is shy when it comes to the opposite sex and won't give the normal 100% during these battles. The Achilles Heel can be anything from a crush on someone that the character has to battle to an actual weak heel. This gives your character a sense of reality.

Zephyr Flare
14th April 2004, 10:11 PM
I admit in S&C all powerful to start with but there's a reason behind it, its to make a defeat even more crushing than normal, if pulled off well it works and you see how it hurts the character majorly, heck I nearly died in one chapter >>

With legends, try to give them life. I include Larka, my Articuno from Red, as a tribute to her but she ain't a squad memeber and I'd never have it that way. However with Chikarma, my Mewtwo and promoted muse, he came before the New Island two so there is a LOT you can play with by giving them reasons of why they're with you. I saved his ickle life without knowing why until later. He saved me about 3 times.

He couldn't pound someone flat as he doesn't have the strength but the heart behind it is enough. Sides I let him roam wherever, to keep him captive would just not be fair on him in particular where every day he is fighting to live due to a virus.

Bwha see, stick some history and reasoning behind them, give them strengths, weaknesses and you may find a real character hidden underneath sted of:

Omfg its a Mewtwo! *Captures it it a Pokeball* Now go blow up Pewter as I dun like it :O

That is just reckless and ill manging of any creature and any who act like that in a fic to any Pokemon is in dire need of being shot.


Sandra

Obsidian Blade
14th April 2004, 11:24 PM
As long as you give them a reason to exist and a personality things go far its just important not to forget other Pokémon and how their feelings may adapt and change as time goes on.

Now there's a point. If you start out with a very young Pokémon it's not going to stay that way forever, naturally it will grow and develop not only in battle prowess but also in character.

For example, in my fiction the main character's first Pokémon is very young, to the point at which she only left her mother a day ago. Right now she's quite, naive and stupidly loyal... at one point she even asks whether being hit with a bullet would hurt!

My theory is that Pokčmon grow up faster than humans, allowing for major personality changes over time. Eventually that naive little Pokčmon Raven has is going to be a lot more world-weary - after all, she'd have to be!

Another point on that is that a Pokčmon’s personality will develop. Key word: d-e-v-e-l-o-p. Although it works if you have your Pokčmon’s personality change when it evolves, you've got to be careful if another Pokémon with a personality you don't want to loose is due for a stage-up as well. Make sure you provide a reason for it to stay the same if it does or else your fiction will be plot-hole full.

If you decide not to go with the personality leaps with evolution you have to regulate the changes that occur to your creatures. One event might really change a Pokémon but otherwise they aren't really going to wake up one day as a bubbly ditz-mon when the day before they were the moody angst guy!

Really, I think the key for good character writing is to keep it believable. Yeah, it's a fic about monsters that can be kept in a tiny ball. That doesn't mean you can just scrap all sense of reality!

Nara_Shikamaru
17th April 2004, 6:43 PM
Time to add my advice, although if I dont know this has been added before.
Firstly, Description:

Draw from all the senses if you wish. Touch, taste, smell, sight and hearing. This can help affect the atmosphere of your fic by giving the reader the same experiences that your character is going through. Sorry, cannot give an example but feel free to add your own if you wish. Various things that are around constantly can bring things to stimulate the senses. The air can stimulate three senses, touch, smell, Hearing and taste for example. the Wind can cause the rustling of the leafs of a tree. You dont have to add things like this, but it does help your readers to help visualise the surroundings.

Emotions/Personality:
I notice in many trainer battles that they dont really show the emotions of the trainer or the pokemon. It would be nice to see some emotion instead of them fighting like robots. Also, remember to give your Pokemon emotion outside of battle, and a personality. Also, I like to add, that just because of their type or status as a pokemon should not always be reflected in their personalities. For example, An Absol could be considered selfish and some what arrogant due to its dark nature, but in reality you could have it to be caring and humble. Fire types dont always need to be 'hotheads'(For those who dont know, that means they can be angered easily).
Also a very important note, all characters will have likes and dislikes, and some Pokemon may have personality clashes.

Feel free to add to what I've put forward

Iveechan
18th April 2004, 9:25 PM
It's not that hard to make a Pokemon in a journey fic dynamic. Just giving it a name is enough to give it more life than just a creature who fights 'n faints. When I wrote my first journey fic in 2000, I even gave all the Pokemon on the teams genders (and this was before GS). Even if you don't go into a Pokemon's personality deeply, little things like that can make a Pokemon on a team more interesting and believable. As an example, here was my main character's team and her Pokemon:

Quincy the Eevee: the "Pikachu" of the team, he was always out of his Pokeball. He is tough but not that great of a fighter, and he has a fear of water because of a near-death experience when he was rescued (long story). The rival, Quincy's previous owner who was abusive, really wants the Eevee back despite calling him a useless weakling, and that is what drives the rivalry between these two trainers.

Nugget the Diglett: the first actually captured Pokemon on the team, Nugget is small, tough, and was even able to beat a Flying type. She's stronger than Quincy, but she had her losses too. She joined the team after hearing the main character's partner tell a sad story about his Vaporeon who was killed by a Zapdos (ANOTHER long story).

Hana the Bulbasaur/Ivysaur: Hana used to belong to Professor Oak (this was when he was younger and didn't give out starters), but seeing the trainer's victory in the Pewer gym convinced Oak that she would make a good trainer for the little Bulbasaur. Because she was let out of the Pokeball often, Hana was able to flourish and she evolved rather quickly. She is one of the stronger Pokemon on the team.

Felicity the Spearow/Fearow: Using her vine whip attack, Hana was able to help capture the aggressive little Spearow, and this was when she evolved into Ivysaur. Despite her adamant nature, Felicity was still loyal, and she evolved into a Fearow when fighting the rival's Pidgeotto. Felicity is also very strong, but she isn't too attached to the trainer.

Rami the Hitmonchan: After seeing the trainer's victory over the Pidgeotto and the evolution of Felicity, a kindly man gave the trainer a special gift; a rare Hitmonchan. Rami was not trusting of anyone and even attacked other people. I never got to the part in the fic where Rami's trust was gained, and I never got to the sixth member who was a Mr. Mime.

In addition to that, there was the partner, Devin, and his team, and three other trainers with full teams, one of them being a rival. This story was never posted anywhere and it was lost years ago. Don't use these ideas, I was just giving out examples how it's not hard to give Pokemon life in fics. This isn't a bash to Sceptile or anything, but I sort of wished he gave the Pokemon in his fic genders.

Tha Legend
24th April 2004, 4:36 AM
Now my 2 cents,

Legendaries - I think it's a Pandora's box to have the hero, or anyone, to capture a legendary pokčmon. I mean, I don't like the idea of a "weak" legendary. I know, if I was a trainer, and I had a legendary pokčmon, I would use it to crush any comers.

In my fic, The Deliverer is a legendary, and it is quite possibly impossible for any regular pokčmon to defeat, and so, my heroes must keep it from being summoned. If you use a legendary, be careful. It can make or break your fic.

~Legend~

FlamingRuby
13th May 2004, 6:35 PM
Okay...some two cents on possibly my fav. thing to include in fanfic...music!

Granted, music is a good thing when it is used to set the mood...just be careful not to have your characters sing every other line unless you intend it for comic purposes.

But how do we notate singing in a story? While most people tend to do this as "'tra-la-la' sang Character A" I've seen some people, myself included, make up a whole key for writing lyrics. For example, my system of writing lyrics looks like this:
Speaking during a song is notated like this
Singing is notated in italics, like this
(backup singers, song parts and directions look like this)
[instrumental solos and dance breaks look like this]

Also, if you have enough music to do so, don't be afraid to build a soundtrack to your story

Obsidian Blade
13th May 2004, 7:26 PM
You have to be careful with music though, sometimes people just use songs to take up page space and make their chatpers look long. ¬.¬ You need a proper plot to the chapter as well as the song or else it gets kinda boring.

Ash_Junior
20th May 2004, 10:02 PM
I agree with some of you when you say that Legendaries can ruin an excellent fic. But that doesn't mean that you shouldn't use them. You just have to be careful. VERY VERY careful.

I'm currently writing a trilogy, and the third book is where a kid (probably around 16, 17) has to gather together a group of Pokemon of a particular type. This type is known as the Titans. VERY powerful, a little more so than the Legendaries. Why am I doing this, you ask? he's doing it to defeat an enemy so powerful, that all sixteen (or was it seventeen?) of them together might not be able to defeat him. I'm talking near ULTIMATE power, here. Yes, I realize that I must be VERY careful, and I'm planning on being careful.

anyway, now that I've done that, here's my take on making stuff up:

*rummages around*

hold on....

I know it's around here somewhere....

GOT IT!!!!!

okay, here we go.


I make up countries all the time, but you also needs blocks and balances. For example, Tintia, my pride and joy, is very powerful. It also is at least fifty years ahead of Kanto/Johto, and the rest of the world in terms of technology.

pros: very powerful, high level of technology

cons: very powerful enemy, xenophobic, has a bad reputation, is raided every few months or so by aforementioned very powerful enemy

this is a good idea to do whenever you make a country.

I pride myself on making unique countries, such as this one:


Engara: big, bad guys. They've been at war with Tintia for hundreds of years. Why did they first start fighting? Because Tintians killed Stephen the Pillar, and they want revenge, and also their religion demanded it. (I'd elaborate on this, but it would spoil Operation: Celebi) Later, as things got going, they wanted revenge for other things, such as their men being killed, cities destroyed, and things of that nature. It basically snow-balled and now it's practically unstoppable.

Pros: They are very devout in their religion, and have a highly advanced military structure.

Cons: Their religion demands that they do evil things, and because of this, they need to take over specific countries, and in their aims, they are absolutely ruthless.

Notice that even though they're the main antagonists, they have a reason for doing what it is they do, and they don't do it "just because they're evil."


Effeular: a country that is torn in a civil war that has existed for hundreds of years. It is a war between Pokemon and humans.

Pros: beautiful landscape (Pokemon half of country), wonderful architecture (human half of country)

Cons: Civil War, trainers are hated (because humans and Pokemon work together), extremely xenophobic


This is, quite literally, a very unique country. I don't think there's another country out there that has a civil war between humans and Pokemon. think about it. Humans, with their technology, against Pokemon, with their powers. Is there anything else out there that can come close to it? and there are no trainers in this country, because both sides think that they've taken the other's side. For example, Pokemon don't like trainers because of the okeballs, and the humans don't like them because they use Pokemon. I'd say this place is pretty unique.


then there is Nuschantz. This is a winter wonderland, a paradise for skiiers, and anyone who loves the outdoors. It is way up high in the mountains, and is covered in snow all year round.

Pros: beautiful, a tourist country

cons: small, harsh weather (blizzards, avalanches, etc.), against the law to capture wild Pokemon, very poor country, No towns (Only Ski Resorts)


Ah....Nuschantz. My favorite. The home of Auroura, and his parents, Austrealis and Borealis. Three of my unique Legendary Pokemon. I have about 30-40-maybe even 50 created Pokemon. Don't start calling them fake Pokemon, because they're real to me. Anyway, this place is basically one big tourist trap. There's no gyms here, no league. This is just a place to get away from it all, and relax. When was the last time you saw something like that in a fic?



here's my advice for making up a new country for a fic. Have something about the country that makes it distinct, like Nuschantz and its snow; Effeular and its civil war; and Tintia and its xenophobic tendencies, despite having its high technological level.

However, always, ALWAYS have cons. have a minimum of three. always have pros, or people won't want to visit. Also, always have the cons out-number the pros. and don't have the cons be stupid things like: The country has no sense of fashion what-so-ever, they like vegetables, or they don't have TV, radio, or internet access anywhere in the country unless its purely for humorous purposes. those are stupid cons, in my opinion. they could be good, if they are tacked on after a few good cons, like the ones that my countries have up above. True, Engara has few pros, but that's because only the people that live there get in and out, unless they're operatives of one of the many gangs (teams) that they have scattered around the globe.


History:


you should always have some sort of history planned out. Something that makes this nation unique. For example, Tintia is unique because it was the first to rebel against Stephen the Pillar (also known as Stephen the Butcher. He waged war against Pokemon according to his religion, which Engara later adopted, and slaughtered billions of them). Effeular's history is nothing special, considering that they are still fighting the war that Stephen the Pillar/Butcher started. History has pretty much ignored Nuschantz, but it has three, count 'em, THREE legendaries. this may not seem like much, bot how often do you have Ice/Solar, Ice/Lunar, and Ice/Lunar-Solar types (yes, that's right, Auroura has THREE types. It would take too long to explain right now, especially considering this is about making countries, but they're all in a family) in one country? Austrealis, Borealis, and Auroura are the guardians of Nuschantz, and help protect anyone who visits there. Engara, for another example, is the originator of Team Rocket, Team Magma, and Team Aqua. Engara pulls the strings of all three teams because they provide most of the funding for all three teams. In addition to those three teams, there is Team Blizzard (Engaran Special Forces--cold Weather division) of Nuschantz, Team Vengeance (Engaran Special Operations--infiltration Division), and many, many others all over the globe.


Society:

What are they like to visitors? Are they friendly to strangers? are they hostile? How are Pokemon viewed? Are they shunned? Welcomed? Treated as equals (like in Tintia)? There's so much I could put here, but I'll just leave it at that.

Geography: okay, you might want to make a map. Just draw it out quickly. Make a quick sketch. Just so you know where everything is. True, I've only drawn maps of Tintia and Alto, but I know where everyone is in relation to Tintia.

For example:

Tintia is north of Johto and Kanto, and East of Janera (Obby's country that is north of Johto, and that I believe Raven takes place in). Alto is due north of Tintia, Engara due east, Neragosh is north-east of Tintia.

I haven't decided where Nuschantz and Effeular are yet, but they're far away from Kanto and Johto.

Also, make their geography unique (I know this should be up there, but bear with me just a little longer). For example, Tintia is part of a continent, Alto and Neragosh are island countries, and Engara is an island chain.

Make sure you factor in politics, too. For another example, Neragosh and Engara are allies, as are Tintia and Alto. Also, Tintia and Alto are enemies of Neragosh and Engara.


Confusing? Not to me. I was the one who worked all this out.


meh, I'll post about how to make Pokemon later. I don't really want to right now.

Digital Espeon
24th May 2004, 6:18 PM
I need help on my story, if you're discribing the following pokemon to a person who never ever saw it before and you want to paint a clear picture in their head, how would you do it?

Iveechan
24th May 2004, 11:01 PM
Directed to Digital Espeon;

Just look at the Pokemon and describe them, but don't go overboard. I can't come up with a good example of going overboard, but part of it would be describing every last inch of a Pokemon, like how many toes it has. For Espeon, just say that it is a purple cat with big ears, large almond-shaped dark eyes, and thin, long, flowy hairs on either side of its head. A red orb rested in the middle of its forhead and the long tail seemed to split into two down the middle of it. Whatever distinguishing feature a Pokemon has, mention it.

SilverStarboy
2nd July 2004, 5:10 AM
i just thought of another tip.




Dont be afraid to make a depressing ending:while happy endings are good they can be ovedone. like maybe instead of always having your character defeat the elite four, maybe he could be at the fourth member and each character wih one pokemon left and maybe the hero could lose.

just a thought

Dilasc
4th July 2004, 2:52 AM
A tip for grammar I have may sound wierd, but it works. What I use when it comes to grammatics is simple, 'If it sounds good when spoken, itll sound good when written.' It works even if it isnt dialog.

It may sound wierd talking to yourself, but I do it all the time. Its my secret to my style.

Ryano Ra
23rd August 2004, 3:42 AM
Alrighty. First off, if anyone needs help, you can PM me or post it here because I'm available for helping. But, my question is this:

In Fan-Fictions, most people put good and bad forces in them, (Ex: Trainer Heroes against Team Aqua/Rocket/Magna themed). Now, my friend, Obsidian Blade, said that it's not good to have these because its only black and white when there should be gray. My question is this: for having a character being both good and bad, would it be a good thing if they acted as though they were with the good forces, then opposed the good guys in surprise? I was just wondering this...because in one of my previous fics, I had a character do a few bad things, then at the end, oppose his best friend in a sheer kill battle. I can take suggestions and replies, thanks!

Yamato-san
23rd August 2004, 4:01 AM
the hero vs. villian routine is fine, however, it really helps if you give an in-depth purpose behind why the villians do what they do. If you have people be evil just for the heck of it, not even having something as simple as money or revenge involved, then you've got an extremely 2D villian. Although, I guess backgrounds and purposes might count towards the "shade of gray", because that demonstrates that everyone has good and evil inside of them, it just takes certain circumstances in life to have one override the other.

DarkScyther
23rd August 2004, 4:28 AM
Yamato-San said it right. 2D villains is usually the cause of a boring black vs white. I think though to further answer your question Aleyquala the shade of grey has to be more in-depth then just a sudden change of heart at the end. You have to really get inside the grey character to give the reader the feeling of unpredictableness. Usually the character 'in grey' will only look after his or her own interests whether or not it involves 'breaking the law' or not.

Take for example Catwoman from the Batman mythos. She's trademarked as a villain but she has never done anything extra-ordinarily wrong to Gotham City. Batman and herself have had a few scrapes and a few love ties themselves, so it is up to the reader to interperate how they see the character. Will they think she is a villain or a protagonist.

That's really the goal that you strive for when creating a 'grey character'. I hope I helped.

Melko
5th September 2004, 4:12 AM
Since this is the "Advice for Authors" thread, I'd like to give some links to places on About.com concerning writing tips. They have some very interesting and useful tips and articles.

For Character Creation and Development:

http://teenwriting.about.com/cs/characters/ht/CharLife.htm

http://teenwriting.about.com/cs/howtos/ht/BuildChar.htm

http://teenwriting.about.com/od/characters/tp/CharQuestions.htm


For Setting Creation and Development:

http://teenwriting.about.com/library/weekly/aa102102a.htm

http://teenwriting.about.com/library/weekly/aa111102c.htm


For Plot Creation and Development:

http://teenwriting.about.com/cs/plotting/ht/BuildBetterPlot.htm

http://teenwriting.about.com/cs/plotting/ht/PlotWork.htm

http://teenwriting.about.com/library/weekly/aa111102b.htm


Please tell me if you would like me to find/post more. Hopefully these should help, and if they're breaking some kind of rule that I'm completely unaware of, please remove this.

Willow's Tara
22nd September 2004, 8:03 AM
I have some advice that might help alot.
Enter the story, Enter the world you created, be there, feel every emotion, feel everything, The tears, The anger, be the characters, Take yourself away from the com and your surroudings. That what i do and it somehow helps, because you are they, you are them, and you can feel everything, Enter the world you created and write it down into a story, feel the wind blowing in your hair, or feel the pain that hits you, or feel the love, Feel everything and be everything, Enter the world, The reaility and take it away from here.

Note; I had such a better advice then that, but when i pressed Post Quick Reply it seems like went to a Page not found and never got posted!

wobbanut
20th November 2004, 7:35 PM
Thanks, Dragonfree, I'll do my best. :)

I looked through all 12 pages of this topic and I didn't see anything on show-based fanfic (Ash and company/Team Rocket, not original trainers). Since I've written a ton of show-based fanfic for other shows, and read a lot of other peoples', I thought I'd put in my two cents.

1. Don't write out-of-character. Make the character act as close as you can to how they appear on-screen. Obvious differences in character can be jarring.
2. Unless it's an alternate universe fanfic, please be aware of continuity when you're setting a story in the present day or in the past. I've still seen some newer fanfics set in the near future where Jessie and James have Arbok and Weezing, and they've been gone for a year.
3. Don't make numerous changes to a show to fit your story. Luckily, most fanfics I've seen warn readers if they've made particular changes to a show to suit the purposes of a story. Multiple changes, however, make me feel that the writer just wants to change everything they don't like about the show (whether it's true or not), and then I'm less willing to read the fanfic. For instance, if someone decides to make it so Misty never left the show and kept Togetic, and May and Max never joined, I'll probably read it. But, if someone also adds Ash still has Charizard and all his pokemon from before, Gary/Tracey/Team Rocket have all been killed off, Brock decided to stay at the gym, Ash never went to Hoenn, etc., I'll avoid the story.

Clare
24th November 2004, 4:23 PM
1. Don't write out-of-character. Make the character act as close as you can to how they appear on-screen. Obvious differences in character can be jarring.

On the other hand, if there's a good reason for the character to do something out of character, there's no harm in having them do it. For example, your fic might involve something happening to make James (who, let's face it, is something of a coward in canon) become a fearless fighter. Kind of like the way his confidence was boosted when he thought his Pokemon personality type was the Moltres . . .

And do remember that people's personalities are not 100% consistent. Imagine, for example, that a normally optimistic character is put into a situation where everything seems to be nothing but doom and gloom. He or she MIGHT manage to maintain hope, but, on the other hand, he or she could just as easily be going through the same emotional turmoil as anyone else in that situation. Consider the following extract from one of my non-Pokemon fics:


The escaped prisoners were back on the slave-chain, all seven of them in varying states of dejection following the ill-fated attempt to rescue Leoric and his party. Even the normally irrepressible Arzon sat staring rigidly ahead, preoccupied by his thoughts. He was beginning to wonder if Bogarvis might have planned this all along, if capturing himself and the others who had been taken from New Valarac was part of a clever scheme to lure Leoric into danger.

"Arzon?" Pallenne's voice cut through the young knight's sombre reverie. "Do you think it's true - what Bogarvis said?"

Arzon sighed heavily. "I don't know, Pallenne," he told her, wishing he knew for definite that his fellow Spectral Knights were alive. But, for the life of him, he couldn't see how they could have escaped from the cave, in which case . . . "If it is, it means we're on our own."

Before anyone asks, the story is based on an eighties cartoon called "Visionaries". Arzon is normally the sort who doesn't let anything get him down, but, in this extract, he's a prisoner and it appears that his friends have been killed. Kind of hard for anyone to keep a positive frame of mind under those circumstances . . .

But don't have someone act out of character for no reason.

Tezza
6th December 2004, 1:42 AM
Two Magic Words

Yep, you read correctly, there are only two words you need to know to write the most amazing story ever conceived. They’re no secret really. Tolkein’s knew them, I think Stephan King lives by them and once I stop my riddling babble, you will to. In fact, if you’ve already started a fiction, you alredy know them

So, what two words am I building up to?

WHAT IF!

Geeze! I bet your thinking. Stupid kid wasting my time! But I’m sure of it, that is all you need to know, but now they are out in the open, what are their hidden meanings? What is their magical power? With just to words you can elaborate and turn the ordinary into the extraordinary.

Right now I’m sitting beneath my favourite tree jotting down words in a notebook. I look around and I see and insect. I stare at it, wonder at it. Then suddenly with a puff of glittery smoke I muse….

WHAT IF!

That sugarbum ant could talk?….. No, wait, that’s already been done. Let’s see. I peer around again and see the jutting wedge of the escarpment hiding half of Kyneema from view, with its rocky crevices and scaled pieces crumbling under the drenching rains we’ve just had. My travels down the ridge and I see a bump, only it doesn’t look like a bump. It looks like a nose. GASP! POOF! SPARKLE! What if that was a nose really was a nose! What if the Kyneema Mountain was really a sleeping titan. What if, because of Kyneema’s drought status it was in hibernation and the flood rains woke it up! What if it went on a rampage! What if, because of my interest in Greek mythology only I knew how to put it back to sleep! What if…….

Baddabing baddaboom! See how quickly that took off. I know some of you read that and snorted ‘Pfft! Sure, its easy doing it like that, plucking something out of the air, but writing a Pokemon story is different!’

How?

Because I’m doing an OT fanfic, and it needs at least some logic to it.

Fine Smartarse, we’ll do it your way!

Let’s look at my second attempt at writing, eh? *cringes* Okay, that’s more than enough to last a lifetime. Its alright isn’t it? My friend Adam was probably sitting down, watching the TV or playing the game, or more than likely see me write my first attempt, and said well,

WHAT IF!

I was a trainer!

Yeah, sure but that’s where the similarities end!

*Looking unimpressed* Is that so? Let’s follow this certain thread.



What if I was a trainer? Let’s say my name is, Hmmmm Mary-Sue.

Well, I’d need to get a starting Pokemon first so lets go to Professor Tree, eh? I’m late! I rush past my underdeveloped character of a parents as well as my hometown. On my way I bump into that mean old rival, who must have terrets syndrome because all he can do is abuse and laugh at me.

We exchange threats and go inside. Professor Tree is there waiting smiling stupidly. I figure he’s gotta be a robot of some kind with a tape recorder in his back because all he does is spout of useless catchphrases. Eventually I get past his babble and he offers a Pokemon!

Mean Old Rival shoves passed and chooses the one I just happen to be reaching for. He nicks off on his way. My turn and I choose Flamie, the fire type, who is actually very intelligent, more so than myself most of the readers think, and he’s very strong, but who cares. I catch up to Mean Old Rival and I’m on my way. We battle, I win, he skulks off. I go on my happy way. I walk around, for about ten minutes, catch five Pokemon, reach the PokeCenter in Bobble Town, beat the gymleader in half a breath, despite the fact he used his most powerful Pokemon, and has been training it for five years. Who cares! I got to sleep for the night, then continue on my way to Bipple City.

I catch three more Pokemon, one happens to be a very rare Mewgol, the evolved form of Mew that only goes to people pure of heart and needs me to save the world or something.

I don’t particularly care because I hear so screaming in the bushes! Oh no, its Team Shuttle, Sharon and Maurice! They’re attacking a trainer of the opposite sex. I send in my Pokemon, I just received the previous day, and shoot them into the sky. Trainer of the Opposite Gender introduces themself as Bobby. They blush and smile and ask if they can follow me. I shrug, completely oblivious because I’ve suffered momentary blindness, or perhaps senility is setting in but it doesn’t matter, I’ve been pre-programmed to reach Bipple Town by night fall.

I turn around and….! What the crap, that city appeared from nowhere!

Who cares! I follow these magical path downwards when oh no! Its some Beedrill! Must be PMS because they’re attacking for no reason at all, or maybe they’re just jealous of my incredible good looks. Who cares! I send out Flamie and he fights and he fights, despite the fact that he can’t be more than level 12 he happens to know the ultimate powerful fire attack, Um… Fire Attack!

Fire Attack wipes out every single Beedrill but Flamie is absolutely exhausted, in fact, he’s dying! I have to rush him to hospital. I’m suffering a mind numbing case of De-ja-vu but…… WHO CARES!!!!!



We’ll leave it there, huh? I bet there are two reactions. One Plagiarist!!!! You read mine and now you’re making fun of me! Or for the more experienced are laughing at it.

I’m hoping you are of the later because this is a typical beginner fiction, only a bit better written because its not in script forms.

If your fiction is in anyway reminiscent of the anime’s first episode, you really aught to take a look at the drawing board again.

But how do we fix this. We’ll go through the start of your typical journey.



I’ll give you tips on devising a character later, but right now we’re going to meet Mary-Sue a little more slowly. Here it took her less than three whole seconds to get out of the house. No *slaps with rolled up newspaper* Bad! We’re going to sit down and take our time.

Where will we meet her? That will depend on her personality. My Mary-Sue’s name will be Ceres, because I’m a fan of mythology. Ceres is the Roman Goddess of nature and crops, so she’s going to be an earthy person, humble, but takes this be a lesson to write about what you know!

So we have a girl who likes plants, where else to find her but in a garden! What if it was the Goldenrod National Park, eyeing their new Scent-sational! Exhibit?



I bent down slowly, lifting a bright golden Chinese lantern to my nose, breathing in its strong, musky scent as I cupped its belled petals in my hand. Now this was relaxing! And to think my rowdy big brother would rather spend his day battling it that stupid old bug contest! Although insects were useful for pollination, I really didn’t have any grand desire to get to know one better. Not Bryce though! Nuh-huh, the booger insisted on bringing home ever injured paras and wurmple he could find. Luckily mum was strict about keeping Pokemon as pets, once they were healed, back to the Viridian forest they went!

And what would he complain? ‘How come Ceres gets to use your Belsprout’s for school then?’

I let the plant escape gently from my fingers as the stiff stem tugged it back amongst its deep, moss green leaves. I peered around me as I tucked one of my loose red curls behind my ears looking for my mother cheerily darting from stall to stall like a Butterfree, nipping at what each had to offer. She was currently being informed that just one single Bellossom had the enchanted properties of a miracle growth simply by singing and dancing on the soil.

I laughed inwardly knowing that right now she had ordered my father to look after her own stall with her firm blue eyes locking his and not letting go until he promised to stay put. He would grumble with his arms crossed sulkily across his chest but he wouldn’t dare disobey mum, which was like asking for a death wish. My mother was very stubborn and I’m glad I never inherited that trait.

My mother was a talented botanist, quite famous in her own circle of expertise but nowhere else. She waited for the Scent-sational! Garden Exhibit all year round, showing off her petunia’s and kangaroo paw plants that always flourished under her nurturing hand. This year it was held in the Southern Corner of Johto’s largest national park, just North of Goldenrod City. Our family followed it where was every year without fail and made a holiday of it.

I suddenly realised how thirsty I was as I licked my lips, standing out in hot summer sun of Johto, feeling dizzy and a little nauseous. Better find a shady tree. But, that was hard to find in flower show so I did my best, weaving in and out of prettily arranged tables until I spied one just beyond, a huge, weeping willow, its limp spaghetti branches were the perfect thing to keep out the heat.



Voila! See, that’s quite a way to start off, I touched on her parents; I gave a bit about her personality and subtly hinted at her appearance, curly red hair. I also gave a good description of where she was, different from the usual waking up late now where do we go from there? Easily, receiving a Pokemon. Firstly we would continue with banter, maybe her meeting a Pokemon trainer that could have strayed from the Bug contest, talk to him or just resting beneath the tree and her telling a bit more about herself, her holiday and how they were going home tomorrow from the airport at New Bark Town.

How will she receive her first Pokemon?

1. Maybe she is resting beneath a tree when the branches sweep aside and a gawky middle-aged man with glasses comes in. She startles him by saying hello as he opens. They chat about how hot it is, and wilted the plants look. She’s a trusting person and so she tells him about her dream to be an even greater botanist than her mother that she’s looking into the techniques of using Leafstone’s to enhance growth as her science project over the Summer holidays but she hasn’t found one yet. He asks her has she ever thought about a Pokemon’s properties of growth. She says yes, she’s thought about it but she doesn’t have the licences to train them. ‘Oh, that’s too bad’ he says,’ I think you would make quite a trainer.’ ‘ Yeah, I’m going home to Viridian tomorrow.’ He smiles secretively and tells her he had best get back to his stall. That afternoon they pack up her mothers stall and take the bus to New Bark the next morning, arriving about 10 o’clock. To her surprise there is the man from the day before and he approaches her parents. “Good Morning, my name is Professor Elm, I met your daughter yesterday.” He explains that he would like to help her daughter with her school project, that he has a friend in Cerulean city that is an expert on induced evolution, Professor Bill Emery and he would be happy to give her a Leaf Stone. Her parents decline, saying that a trip over Mt Moon is too expensive and they’ve already spent their holiday fund. He tells them that is not a problem, have they ever considered letting their daughter Journey? No, she hasn’t a Pokemon or a licence. Her brother chips in ‘she can’t have my scyther!’ he caught yesterday at the bug contest. He continues saying if they were willing to put of leaving till tomorrow, Ceres could take her Pokemon Licence exam in an hour or two and he would put them up for the night. She does so, passing reasonably well and he winks, giving her a green Pokeball engraved with a Leafstone. Inside is a wonderful Pokemon, but don’t open it till she gets home, so its just her and it. Inside can be any Pokemon you desires and can follow a journey from there.



2. This one is a bit more exciting. Okay, she wanders around looking for her brother to watch him at the Bug Contest. She gets bored, ambles around a bit more, maybe she’s thinking about things at school, or her home town, a bit of history. Finally she ends up at that willow tree and sits beneath it. Meanwhile the sun is setting and the people are closing down their stalls while she’s hidden behind the leaves. Suddenly there is a great blast of light that blinds her even behind the trees. She shrills, trying to stagger outside and see what is happening but that is drowned out by a sudden explosion she is thrown back against the trunk, stunning her. She hears the tables being thrown back and flapping tarps and screams of terror. Groping blindly, staggering and panting as her sight slowly melts back. Peering through the leaves she sees aggressive men in black demanding the Pokemon, there are a lot at the convention, they shove and threaten, and she sees her mother standing up and trying to lecture them, a moment of humour perhaps. She wants to help but she’s scared. Finally as she musters the courage and she’s about to step into clear sight when she hears through ringing ears the leaves on the other side of the tree being brushed aside and hushed whispers. One drags her back inside. Its two boys and a girl from the Bug Contest who have seen what happens. They’re about seventeen and they say, stay here while its safe kid. With roars they rush out into view with red blasts of Pokeballs and moderately strong Team’s begin to battle, but citizens are in the way and she sees her father sandwiched between and Ursaring and a Primeape. He’s batted aside by the ursaring crashing into an over turned table and is hurt. She screams and dashes out to help, ducking between Pokemon and getting hit once or twice. More and more trainers of the bug contest are turning up and turning the tide on the flood of Rockets, but they all have well trained Pokemon on their side. She gets to her fathers side and her mother is by her side, lecturing him on how he’s always getting into trouble, more humour. They shoulder him off to the sidelines but Ceres wants to help when she sees Rocket’s cornering a Vileplume with their Pokemon. She rushes in and starts beating on their back, thumping him in the kidney’s so that he misses an attack command and the Vileplume can get the better of him and turn him away. It thanks her in its own way and bumbles away helping the battling. The Rocket, furious, grabs her arm and lifts her into the air snarling at her. But one of the Bug contestants, rams him letting her go and she rolls under a table clothe. He gets up and a Pokeball comes loose, rolling under with her. She picks it up and etched into it is the name Max. Sirens whir in the distance and the Rocket’s give it up as botched, miscalculating the Bug Contest and they flee. She comes out when the cost is clear and sees officers sweeping up the mess, Pokemon are unaccounted for and Pokeballs are everywhere, along with soil and mangled plants. She meets her parents who are being questioned by a Jenny. She shows her the Pokeball to Jenny and she tells her to take it over to a man counting the Pokeballs and jotting notes down frantically. She comes over and he’s too flustered to listen and send her away. Her curiosity gets the better of her and she takes it over, back to her tree. Releasing the Pokemon, it’s a Breloom scarred and bruised and it shrinks away from her whimpering. She speaks softly and it opens its eyes and looks around and stares at her puzzled.



“Bree-bree?”

“Hello,” I said gently, reaching a hand out to pet it. It cringed, as if waiting for a blow to fall, but as I stroked its velvety mushroom head, it cooed with evident relief. “Hello there, is your name Max?”

It shook its head emphatically, and suddenly bounded up, jerking its small red paws above its head, miming a Pokeball being thrown. “Loom, breeloooooom!”

“Your trainer?” I laughed softly at his antics, it was like a bizarre game of charades. “That Rocket was your trainer?”

It shooks its head even more ferociously, looking at the mess around it with furious anger. “Oh my, you’re a stolen Pokemon? Max was your trainer before you were stolen!”

“Looom,” it moaned with heartbreaking misery, it dropped to the ground with its little legs splayed and its tail drooped and began to sob mournfully.


Her heart breaks as she watches, and tries to assure it that once the man over there is done taking notes, he’ll find Max and you can be together again. It cries out and grabs protectively at her ankles and shakes its head with tears glistening in its eyes. It’s too scared. She then without thinking promises she’ll help find its trainer. She goes back to her parents and Officer Jenny with Breloom dogging her heels as close as it could. She explains the situation that it doesn’t want to leave her. Jenny thinks its just a Rocket’s Pokemon by the scars and agrees to let her keep it. Her parents allow her to keep it and they go back to Viridian. Over the weeks it grows stronger and more trusting, giving him the nickname Boxer, not leaving Ceres except for school, and even then he doesn’t’ leave the doormat until she returns. But he always has the look of homesickness about him. Finally she tells her parents that she wants to look for Boxer’s trainer. She had to apply for a Trainer licence with Professor Oak in able to keep him so she’s can leave. Her parents have grown close to Boxer and they notice is depression and let her go. So in her room that night she spreads maps of various Regions in front of Breloom and asks how long ago he was stolen. He raps out five with his tail. Five months. Where was he travelling? He points to the map of Hoenn. She figures Max would still be travelling so after a weeks preparation she flies to Little Root Town and registers with the League, on a Mission to find Max. Apparently he’s quite famous so she chases him all over Hoenn, which is coincidently the regular track across the Region, always just one step behind him. She earns badges so she can control Brelooms growing power and catches her own, but at the same time that Rocket who she took him off is tracking her, trying to get Boxer back. There you go, quite a good journey



Both were come up just from the spot. You can see they’re jauntily written, just simple guide lines and I suggest you scrawl out a flowchart for each chapter so you can see where you want to go but its just that easy. Just go one sentence at a time always thinking, what if, what next, then what would happen? How can I put a problem in Ceres’s path, because that’s what people want to read about. They don’t want to see a trainer who’s path is laid out before them as smooth as sand. They want to see how they can overcome a problem. You can use either of those examples if you like, they’re pretty good and if I wanted to start again I would choose them.

It’s as easy as that, be wild and have fun. Something bizarre and always keep a look out around you as you decide ideas. I spent most of my bus trips to school thinking what would Topaz do next. In her future there is a Circus, a cross country race to Ecruteak on Chilun, trying to buck her off every step of the way, trading capers, mismatches on in the Whirl Islands, an emotional court case as her licence could be revoked and Pokemon suspended, and meeting the Wings of Council bit by bit just the least of it.



And that, my aspiring writers, is the power of What If.

Tezza
10th December 2004, 2:44 AM
The Keys to Writing



Firstly I’d like to point out that this was first written as a review to help an up an coming writer I thought had a lot of potential and I thought it was so good I saved a copy, now I’m turning it into a Tutorial to help others on the way!

Well, you know two magic words to devising a plot to your fiction, but what about fleshing it out? There is nothing in the world I hate more than Scripting, unless it’s a humour fiction. Scripting is for those who can’t be bothered putting a ‘he said’ on the end and it really doesn’t give any idea to what is happening. The goal of the writer is to paint a picture of what they see with words. The better you can describe what you see, the more enjoyable it is to read. For example

Mary-Sue: Go Flamie
Gary-Stu: Go Bubblish
Mary-Sue: Flamie, use Firespin
Gary-Stu: You can’t beat me! Use Bubble, Bubblish! Knock its lights out!
The attacks hit each other and exploded.
Mary-Sue: Fine Tackle attack and then a tail whip
Gary-Stu: Dodge it

Oh for gawds sake! That was painful just writing it and so boring to read! That is the epitome of laziness!

But, I’m going to help you fix that problem. Firstly open your Word Document, I use Microsoft Word open in Web View, via View-> Web Layout. I write in size ten Tahoma because I know that if I can fill three lines I can at least have a decent picture of what’s happening.

Writing is divided into three keys: Description, Action and Emotion. If you know how to use these it can make the world so much easier.

Description: This is the most important! Describe everything, every little action, item, person! The idea of writing is to get people to see what you see, like a little movie in your head. The best way is to describe.

Don't say: “Well than, come inside” he said and held the door open for them.

Say, “Well then!” Professor Oak exclaimed brightly, opening the large wood panelled door wide open giving a clear view of his quaint living quarters. Leaning in eagerly they could see plush couches of red velvet and a Wurmple woven mats laid carefully on the smooth wood. But at the top of the stair’s they saw a door left curiously ajar, with the red carapace face of a Kingler bubbling at them.

See, that works heaps better! I managed to fill four lines, and I always make myself fill at least three per paragraph and one per line of dialogue. Use as many adjectives as possible and use the five senses to help. I mean, you don’t have to say the Kingler looked mighty tasty, or you could if you were feeling a little peckish, but you could it gurgled happily with the faint briny smell of the ocean seemed to float around it.

Wait we don’t even know what our characters look like. I could just go ahead and say Jace has brownish black hair in a ponytail and brown eyes or I could do it subtly.

The glare of the morning sun beat down on the small but busy town of Pallet. Already people were bustling about their daily chores but none more anxious than a very short 13 year old girl, shifting pacing anxiously outside an immense white wash building known throughout town simply as The Lab.

She paused her pacing in front of the door, roughly shoving back a strand of her long browny black hair that was always escaping her customary ponytail and into her muddy brown eyes. The sky would fall and Spoink would fly before her hair came out of that ponytail, she even slept with it in. She was the total tomboy her younger brother claimed her to be, dressed in her favourite, daggy blue shorts and Hawaiian shirt at least four sizes too big, so long it almost covered her scabby knees and elbows.

Whoa! See that! Out of about a dozen words I stretched it out to two paragraphs simply by making little comments that also gives a bit of a clue to her personality! You just have to see it clear enough to describe it!



Action: Keep in mind that no matter what's happening, something is always moving, your character, your scenery, even their eyes are skitting from person to person.

So when:

This is the moment I’ve been waiting for my whole life” Jace beamed and chose the last Pokeball.
“Wonderful” proclaimed Professor Oak “Go and enjoy your journey. Oh, I almost forgot take these five extra Pokeballs so you can start building your collection”
“Thankyou very much” Adam said.
“Yeah, thanks heaps” Jace added.
“Me too, see you soon” Ashlee told him.
“We’ll call you as soon as we get to Viridian city” said Adam and the three turned and started walking out.



Or it could be:

Jace stared with barely check anticipation at the last, polished Pokeball, gleaming almost enchanted on the sterilized silver table.
“I’ve been waiting for this moment my whole life,” she said breathlessly, picking it up in both hands and admired it as it sat with its button lenses winking at her sitting in her cupped fingers. “It’s perfect.”
“Wonderful!” exclaimed Professor Oak with obvious relief there hadn’t been any fights, which was happened so regularly he should have also taken up a sports refereeing course those many years ago at University. Still smiling warmly he fished three plastic packets from the deep white pockets of his lab coat already prepared. Inside each were five compressed Pokeballs for the trainers to be. “I almost forgot! Take these, they’ll come in handy on the road to Viridian.”
Three greedy hands snatched them away lickity split and he chuckled to himself.
“Thankyou very much!”
“Yeah, thanks heaps!”
“Me too!”
The voices chorused with foolish grins. This is what he loved most about his job, you couldn’t get such innocent appreciation anywhere else.


And once again I’ve managed make you see the picture much clearly in your head. Try to drag everything out as much as possible. I always keep my rule in mind, three lines per paragraph and one and a half lines per dialogue. It forces you to describe what you see in your head.

Emotion: This is the last one and basically encompasses all adverbs, as in 'said unhappily, thought slyly.' It gives an insight into the characters personality because it’s how they react to different things. So one character may 'shimmied enthusiastically through the branches, with his less cheerful companion lumbered half way up, folding his arms stubbornly refusing to go any further.'

You don't always have to say 'he thought' you can imply it through your writing. As in ' he rolled his eyes in exasperation.

So what it really comes down to is, something happens, and describing what your character thinks of it.

And voila, short and sweet, I hope it helps

Dilasc
11th December 2004, 6:41 AM
Description, even in a great amount is never a bad thing. Its kind of like water, enough of it is good for you, but too much drowns the world. So, personally, I drown the world with description, but I do so while doing more than describing. Namely, I add the description as an aside that goes alongside of a more important aspect of the plot. It helps paint a vivid image, and back to the water, it makes it crystal clear.

Suffice to say, I tend moreso to carry myself overboard when it comes to human/pokemon emotion, which is anything but bad and very important to ensure that not one bloody Mary gets into my fic. Otherwise that character gets... bloody, mwahaha!

Anyway, the point is that description is a dangerous force of power, that should not be tampered with too deeply unless you know how to control and manipulate it.

Ryano Ra
21st December 2004, 6:16 PM
Question #1: Well, about Legendaries, should characters make contact with legends, and if so, probably attempt to capture them? What if a legendary chooses to become a nobel trainer's Pokemon? If a trainer tries to capture a legendary, should the legendary be caught or evade?

Tezza
22nd December 2004, 3:29 AM
Considering human nature, would you describe anyone as noble? If they were, I wouldn't read them as a character, it sounds so perfect. I'd like it better if the legend stumbled on this hopeless trainer, and like a mother is always waiting in the shadows, following from behind to save him in some way... even so the writer would be treading lightly. And why do people always refer to them in the anime singuarly? It would be pretty useless just having one of something.

Dilasc
22nd December 2004, 10:45 AM
Noble is a vague word to use. Sure we have our rare ursurpurer against the norm of corruption and money, but its nearly impossible to be noble mainly because a such person could never manage in society if he has no money, and we all know that money is evil, or should now know that it is anyway.

Regardless, I'd not touch a legendary with a ten foot pole. I may stab it multiple times with a ten foot pike and THEN you can have any haphazard sleezeball trainer leash it up so long as you remember its got bloody craters in its body that will never heal and as such you've lost to a new born magikarp. Suffice to say, that's an extreme, but I ALWAYS take things to the extreme if they illustrate a point.

Now, lets reverse the situation, we turn the trainer into vegetable salad and we have Mewtwo in its 00berestness eva! Lol! Bleh! 1337speak is getting to my head... anyways. This situation is tough. There's a sentient and agile pokemon with the power to defeat the planet Jupiter in an arm wrestling contest and have enough time to get to get together with his buddies and bully Saturn because, well, its COOL to be a bully. However your trainer has no access to any of his 8 billion/trillion senses and is practically as efficient at making heat energy as a carrot eternally at absolute 0.

Things are similar, unless of course the legendary is the trainer, by which I mean he's your every day moron who cant realize his underwear is not a way to stop ozone depletion by flinging poptarts into the upper stratosphere (and such a waste of poptarts). However, it's Mar-Suemon and Mar-Suemon can do ANYTHING and EVERYTHING. Why when Mar-Suemon burps, people instantly rip off their skin and use their last moments of life to work it into a fine pair of leather shoes, cozy and efficient. Mar-Suemon can get 9000 badges while exploring the never to be known universe in half an hour and not even need to cheat by using relativity factors that come into play when the speed of life is nearly attained and then passed. This of course is while saving world hunger, except that Mar-suemon burped and therefore got more leather to fashion. Then of course Mar-suemon pouted and the audience goes 'awww' which suddenly brings everyone back from an afterlife where football collides most stupendously with Jesus Christ, Buddah, Benjamin Franklin, Aristotle, Carmen Electra, Genghis Khan, Spiderman, and some alien-peoples from places who we could hardly give a dang about and with things we dont care about because we're human and only care about other humans (and pokemon because we're a shallow bunch). It means a wild party loaded with booze, because hey, I'm guessing we're wasted... our time reading that, that is to say! Of course, every good pokemon knows how to leash his trainer, the problem is they dont have the hand capacity or the lack of resistance to put the leash on. But Mar-Suemon could get the Hulk on a leash without even breaking a sweat.

The point? A legend is a legend is a legend... Im guessing its a legend! The point? Try to be realistic, and invite me to the next afterlife party so I can watch Honest Abe do his impersonation of the [current] president again while he's entoxicated and drinking Hercules and Ramses II under the table. So remember, regular pokemon may not be strong, but this is fanfiction, not nap time so stop putting me to sleep before I've conk myself out. Unless you could write the perfect story... which is bad because you'd have to be a living breathing Mary Sue, which means you're not worthy of life because perfect people are too boring to exist which is why nobody ever dared to birth a perfect person and pokemon in real life know it too, why do you think they know to only exist in the pokemon universe? They're too smart to ever get the chance to be real I tells ya!

Ahem. If anyone has a brain seizure after reading all of that, then just remember that legendaries in the ball in your hand is a bad thing, and the ball in your hand is amaingly densely packed with life and light energy! Now, please drool your brains out in the trash bin as it makes an awful mess on the floor beneath you to not do so.

Yamato-san
23rd December 2004, 7:15 AM
Dilasc, that post was friggin hilarious.

Anyway, if your characters aren't gonna be extremely 2D (and hopefully, they won't), then there might not really be such a thing as a good or evil. If you make your antagonist deep, not wanna rule the world or slaughter or whatever for the hell of it, or they're not simply insane, then from their perspective, their view of how they want things to be is right and would conflict with the protagonist's sense of right and wrong (think of Shishio from Rurouni Kenshin), so try not to think of it as 'good vs. evil fights', just conflicts of interest. Conflicts of interest not only cause protagonists and antagonists to fight eachother, but also makes protagonists or antagonists fight amongst themselves. Of course, when they fight amongst eachother, conflicts don't usually get as extreme and lethal as a protagonist vs. antagonist conflict, but they still exist. There're still neutral people of course, those who just don't want to get involved, but such people obviously wouldn't fight against eachother side, except possibly in a manner of self-defense.

Dilasc
14th January 2005, 4:35 AM
Hate to sound like I'm making a pointless bump, but I thought I'd offer some advice.

I know it may be a bit unorthadox, but I dont care. Anyways, down to the point, can you, or your characters more exactly, 'Talk the Talk... grammatically correct!'

He said, she said = he dead, she dead. To the point, that means that you you should watch what you have your characters do. To say 'Never end a dialog with the dull simplistics of <name> said' may be asking too much if you're creativity is not like mine. Then again, that's why I'm helping out. So what the heck do you do? You plug in better words, duh! 'Bellowed at the top of his lungs', 'replied curtly with brevity', 'was all he said before storming out with legs stomping the ground'. Notice that last example had the word said in it? I'll be damned if that word was potato, because it looked like said (even if in some alien language, said means potato). Well, did you notice a whole lot of poetic words around the word said in that sentence? Im sure you did if you have anh IQ of at least 25 and I think only 1 thing in the universe has an IQ below that... sedimentary rocks, though Igneus rocks have an IQ of 27, and cabbage of 27.3, and clipped toenails have 32.5, and it may surprise you to know that argon gas has an IQ of 454 on average, which is nthing compared to the Venutian IQ of 3075 and my imaginary friend Pooky is at 4198 for his intellectual quotent. Still, if you arent a sedimentary rock, you know what I'm saying.

Now, those are only examples, and I dont expect them to be used, for that'd be copying me, and though imitation is the best form of flattery, a steamroller is the best form of flattening. Catch my drift? Of course, try to figure out what fits the situation reasonably. After all, dont have a 27 hour presidental campainathonapalooza and say that the 5 hour speech was brevity. If it was under an hour, then its a brief presidental speech, because we know how the 'most powerful men on earth' LOVE to hear themselves speak, even if they aint saying anything! Regardless, if a 5 hour speech is brief, then this dialog is brief, which means that the Sun WEARS briefs. Yet we all know damn well that the Sun wears boxers, and if that's the case, dont use the word breif if its not short. Likewise, dont say roaring in anger if its the happiest day in existance if such a thing exists when you consider how small and insignificant we all are. Aint I just the most exiting and optimistic person EVER to exist or have existed?

Now, we know whats going around the words, but can your characters talk right? Or are you just writing the scripts for my next episode of LEET TV (Channel 1337, in story Dust to Deceit, by moi). Here's a good idea. What you think you want to say, say it! Talk to yourself, even if you get funny looks and a free straight jacket for doing so, just do it. Even if a gun is to your head... well maybe not then. If it makes sense, type it up! Provided, you better know that ebonics 24/7 is a no-no.

Now, here's something you may or may not know. Time, the fourth dimension, is a relative. What's that mean? Well, it means really, just dont think about it or your extra shrunken, simple heads will explode! In fact, time is on your side! Thats right, the more time you take to think it over, the better off you'll be, as will your story if you actually put an effort into it.

Anyway, now that you're all either bored, gaping mouthed, laughing, wierded out, or even dancing to the funky chicken, you now know a little more from an expert willing to help all those beneath him.

Jo-Jo
14th January 2005, 11:57 PM
Ah, do you mind if I dispute a couple of your points, Dilasc? I just had some disagreements, is all...


To say 'Never end a dialog with the dull simplistics of <name> said' may be asking too much if you're creativity is not like mine. Then again, that's why I'm helping out. So what the heck do you do? You plug in better words, duh!
...And here's number 1. ^^;;; In my experience, constantly ending dialogue with long reams of vocal descriptors tends to give readers a headache; plus, it slows the pacing right down and takes attention away from what's actually being said. The word 'said' is so useful precisely because it's invisible - you don't even notice it's there. That leaves you free to concentrate on the dialogue itself. Which is not to say that it should be used at the end of every single line, but you get my point.


'Bellowed at the top of his lungs', 'replied curtly with brevity', 'was all he said before storming out with legs stomping the ground'.
See, if I were beta-reading a fic which had those lines in it, I'd probably tell the author to chop them down a bit. 'Bellowed at the top of his lungs' is alright, but 'replied curtly with brevity' is awkward and clunky. 'Brevity' means the same thing as curtness, so the second half of that sentence is just repeating information we've already been given in the first half. 'Replied curtly' would suffice. Same goes for 'storming out with legs stomping the ground' - an amount of stomping is already implicit in the 'storming' (and I don't see what else the guy could possibly be stomping except the ground, so that's another superfluous word right there), so why not just cut it all down to 'was all he said before storming out'? It gets the point across just fine.


Now, those are only examples, and I dont expect them to be used, for that'd be copying me, and though imitation is the best form of flattery, a steamroller is the best form of flattening.
I think that attempting to copyright such common phrases might not get you very far. ;) I'm positive that I've used 'bellowed at the top of his lungs' before (although I probably cut it down to just 'bellowed').

Dragonfree
15th January 2005, 12:19 AM
I agree with Jo-Jo; while always using just said, said, said is horribly boring, it's just annoying if you always word things unnecessarily lengthily. If you can say the same thing in fewer words, by all means use the shorter one. Nobody wants to read a dialogue that's supposed to be heated but has abstractly enormous sentences (at least compared to how they could be) after each line.

Magnus
25th January 2005, 7:53 AM
Use whatever pokemon you want. Who says that certain pokemon dont live where you want them to live. You are the author you can decide where they find the pokemon. Just because the game sets pokemon in certain regions doesnt mean you have to. The show breaks pretty much every rule of the game, so you can find tauros in hoenn and wild rhydon. Of course thats just what I think.

SilverBlaze09
25th January 2005, 10:41 PM
Make sure it's believable, though. I mean, would you look for Seaking in a volcano? Or Rhydon on the seashore? If you do, either you or the pokemon is crazy. Put 'em where you'd look for them in real life. Take Magmar(an easy one). It has pokedex stats that state " ...its bodily colors enable it to blend in with its volcanic habitat" (yes, I know that's not exactly what it says, but the two or three words that are off don't count). You would epect to catch it in a volcano, not the Seafoam Islands beach resort, right? Of course, there are a lot of pokemon, like Pidgey, that, one way or another, can be found virtually anywhere(including Legendaries). And yes, I know there are a lot of others that can be found in multiple areas. All I'm saying is, keep it real. Or you'll end up searching for Goldeen in your bathtub(like my sister). Or on a quest to capture Blastoise, and you're looking for them in the big beach getaway of Verdanturf(like my brother). Or looking for Zubat in Sunnyville(hey, I was intoxicated at the time!). That's all I have to say(for the moment, at least). SB
;257;

pretty pikachu
26th January 2005, 6:32 PM
hello. I've read this whole post & its helpfull!

I am trying to write a fic about human/pokemon hybreds. this is my descreption of my main character, Violet. she's a psychic espeon/human. is this too much describing, not enough, or what?

oh, by the way, we find out later why her hand hurts...


She was about 14 years old. She wasn't very tall, but her ears made her seem taller. Sitting atop her head were two long cat ears; about five inches long. They were the same lavender color as her shoulder-length hair. She had a little bit of hair in front of her forehead, partially hiding the bright red ruby between her eyebrows. Her clothes were also purple, like her long cat tail that split in two near the end. She looked at her hand, which had quarter-inch retractable claws on each finger. Her hand- or paw, some might call it- had just been hurting her for no reason. But she knew why; she was psychic.

Mighty Hyena
6th August 2005, 10:10 PM
My 2 cents.


Here's also a tip, these pokemon are extremely overused: Dratini, Larvitar, Pikachu, the starters, Eevee. Because of the flooding of many fics with those Pokemon repeatedly, it can be overlooked because of a common starter.
All of the Eeveelutions are overused, particulary Umbreon because it dispenses ready-made angst (oh noz!!! my cute eevee is all ebil!!! rar!, or oh noz!!! i'm ebil now! rar!). Mewtwo is often quite similiar with the angst (oh noz!!! i'm a clone/i hate humans! rar!).

About Mary-Sues: Pokemon can be Mary-Sues. Canon characters *cough*PIKACHU*cough* can be Mary-Sues. They are everywhere. They are in your stories (especially trainer fics). In your one-shots. In your house. Check for Sueism before you write, not after you're done 12 chapters and your char is already hopeless. Also: poor May and Brendan are mercilessly Sue-ified. If you have to give them a new character, please make them INTERESTING... ;_;

One of the ways I try to avoid Sueishness and to add interest is to give someone flaws. The Seven Deadly Sins really help if you can't decide on something. In case you don't know, they're Pride, Lust, Anger, Envy, Sloth, Gluttony, and Greed. If you want to add one good feature to your bad guys, the Seven Virtues are Faith, Hope, Charity, Temperance, Fortitude, Justice, and Prudence - remember that your bad guys need good points too. I had an MS that I made into a developed char by using Pride (she's selfish) and Anger (she has a temper) - now she's not only more fun to write, she behaves like a real person.

Aaaand that's all I have to say. Good luck with all your fics!

Dragonfree
9th August 2005, 6:41 PM
I don't really agree with the above. Flaws are nice, but giving a character flaws for the sake of giving them flaws is very fake. You shouldn't really think of a personality as a set of good things and a set of flaws. A personality is just a personality, and either it's a believable personality or not. Whether it's believable is supposed to be what you're thinking about, not whether you can list (insert number here) flaws in it.

Ryano Ra
10th August 2005, 4:06 PM
I don't really agree with the above. Flaws are nice, but giving a character flaws for the sake of giving them flaws is very fake. You shouldn't really think of a personality as a set of good things and a set of flaws. A personality is just a personality, and either it's a believable personality or not. Whether it's believable is supposed to be what you're thinking about, not whether you can list (insert number here) flaws in it.[Agreeing with Dragonfree]
Yes, I agree with that. Giving a character a personality with flaws and such can be quite tempting to make them not-believeable. Just Dragonfree said, a personality is just a personality. Flaws can add on to the personality, but just giving them some can be quite unrealistic; some people have more flaws than others, so why try to give the other one with more advantages more flaws? You should worry about making realistic character rather than one with flaws and advantages in your story.

And this overused Pokemon stuff; I'll be a bit opinionated about this, but I don't think there is such a thing called 'overused and underused' Pokemon. A Fanfiction is a story, not something that has to be so diverse, so different from one another. For example, many people see Pikachu more as a Pokemon Idol or Hero, therefore, using him/her more. However, when they grace the walls, people are saying that they are overused and should have chosen another one. The thing is, Pokemon can be used as many times; the person using them can use them, because it is their story. You just can't classify Pokemon as those two titles, just because some are used more often. For example, if I want to use Pikachu in all of my stories, then I can because it is my story, not anyone elses. And if this part shouldn't be in here, please tell me. ^^ I went rambling a little, because I don't like to hear about overused and underused Pokemon in Fanfictions.

purple_drake
15th August 2005, 7:16 AM
If you're writing just to get readers, then I'd say you're writing for the wrong reasons. Write because you want to write and because you enjoy it. It doesn't matter how popular you are; some people get only one or two readers in their first fic, if that, and then manage to find more readers after their second. Don't give up just because you feel like you're not popular - keep trying.

Negrek
20th September 2005, 4:29 AM
I found this posted in a LiveJournal community, and I think that it's the best definition of a Mary-Sue that I've ever come across. Now, I know that that discussion has sorta died down around here (for now *Jaws theme plays*), but I think that it should go in here because, really, it's an excellent definition for something intangible and difficult to describe.


The problem with defining what 'Mary Sue' means is that there are a lot of different ways for a character to be a Mary Sue. Mary-Sueism has more to do with an author's attitude towards her character than some checklist of Mary Sue traits. A Mary Sue is the author's pet, who's doted upon to the detriment of the story and the other characters.

Mary Sue cannot be upstaged.

I think that the best definition of Mary Sue - which doesn't work all the time, but works better than any of the others I've heard - is this: A Mary Sue is like a black hole that warps the fabric of the story, pulling everything into her orbit. Everyone either loves her or treats her cruelly, whether or not it's in character for them to even care. She gets away with things no one else would get away with. And so on.

Or another definition: If you put Mary Sue on one end of a see-saw, and the rest of the story on characters on the other, Mary Sue would be heavier. She's out of balance for her story - she's too much of something. She's too powerful, she's too tragic, she's too brave, she's too smart, she's too loved or too hated ...

Things that often get an original character labeled as a Mary Sue, like resemblance to an author, a floofy name, or special powers, aren't what makes a Mary Sue. It just happens that a lot of Mary Sue authors use 'special' traits to make their character seem cool, and resemblance to themselves as a way to get a little more vicarious wish-fulfillment.

If you put a piece of yourself into many characters does that make them all Mary-Sues

I've never heard this definition, even as fuzzy as the definition of Mary Sue is. Most fiction writers put a little bit of themselves into their characters, but they definitely aren't all Mary Sues.

is a Mary-Sue someone you base completely off yourself?

I don't think so. I would call that type of character a self-insert. Self-inserts are USUALLY Mary Sues in my experience, but I have seen them done occasionally without being Mary Sues. It's all a matter of balance.

Aethyrial_Flame
23rd October 2005, 3:25 PM
^_^ Since this is such an intresting and useful topic, I thought that I'd add a few of my own thoughts.

On the Mary-sue versus self-insertion front, it is IMPOSSIBLE not to, in some way, self-insert. A real, believable character is all the more real if the author has actually been through a similiar experience.

E.g- a piece written about the death of a family member won't be able to fully encompass the consequences of that, unless the writer themselves has actually experienced it. Or, if your character has been abused (most often seen with bishie's that have a dark past, as their 'other half' needs to understand them) unless you yourself have been abused in a similiar way, you (and thence your readers) will never be able to see the sheer depth and long-reaching consequences that such a past entail.

So, really, you CANNOT write a character wtihout self-inserting. You draw upon your own personal experiences, beliefs, values, and personality traits to make a character believable. Also, most writers I know base many characters off of friends and family, thus making said characters more 3-D, so to speak, because they are grounded in reality.

Mary-sues have been discussed to the death, but, for the most point, I agree with Negrek. However, I have something to add ^_^ MS, I think, are also a way of compensation. In several of my fanfics, I write flaws in my characters, but it's hard to do- a lot of the time you simply want to gloss over the nastier aspects of their character.

I myself hate people who look down upon others, are brash to the point of extreme rudeness, and are carelessly cruel. However, many people have those behavioural traits themselves in minute amounts, including me, so, in a way, my sub-conscious refusal to write them in my characters is a kind of penance for me.

And next up.... ^_^ Tips for writing!

I'm not sure if anyone else is like this, but I'm a somewhat noisy person. There's always someone around the house making nosie, or my menagerie is kicking up a fuss, whenever I'm working on something. So complete silence tends to distract me rather than help.

Music is a good helper, though be careful with it; although it's great for loosening the barriers of your mind and helping you to write more freely, it does have it's side affects. Again, personally, I myself am very influenced buy what I hear, even if I'm not paying any attention to it.

Music like Marilyn Manson, Linkin Park, and Evanessence tend to help me write more angsty, dark themed pieces, where's bands like Seal, Savage Garden, and artists Avirl Lavenge (early albums, Nobody's Home etc) and Michelle Branch put me in a kind of love-worn and seeking-love mood.

Finishing for that section, Music is great for helping set up a mood for a story and distracting you so that you work better, but just be careful what you listen to, and keep in mind how you want your story to flow.


Although a lot of people write chapter descriptions and plot things out, I really don't go for that. Usually, I'll get an idea and just go with it; maybe fleshing it out in my daydreams, etc. Slowly, I build what I want up, but after getting more experience, I've come up with a good way of getting things sorted (like a pesty plot!).

Instead of defining everything in exact detail, I just brainstorm. I scribble something that I want to happen in the future, a side-note about someones character, and introspective analysis of why someone acts the way that they do. That way, I have my ideas there to refrence for later on, but I'm not set in stone about them, which I find very discouraging.

And my final thing to discuss, the always engaging topic of REVIEWS.

Despite the fact {Well, *I* consider them good, anyway} my stories are quite well written, and have been for several years, I don't get many reviews. It's rather discouraging to read a fanfic that has only engaging characters and a good plot, but not quite up to standard grammer, that has around 300 views to my piddling four or five.

After extensive thought and research, I've come to a conclusion.

Ghost Reviewers.

I don't review every single story that I read; very few, in fact. Most of the stories that I love I simply read, and wait for an update! What a contradictory hypocrite, hmm? ^_^ Even though I greatly enjoy reading those fanfics, I rarely review them because, quite simply, I'm too damn lazy.

So, too all those authors out there in the same straits as I- do not despair! It's highly likely that your readers are simply to lazy to review, enough though they admire your work... Actually, come to think of it, that isn't very encouraging =S

Well, I hope that, in some way, I've helped those who read this, so, I shall leave.

^_^ Cya!

Bigbrother87
19th March 2006, 9:25 PM
Wow, this is all very good here. I've only been able to read the first, second, and last page so far, but it's already helped me in designing a possible story idea.

Like Aethyrial_Flame, I daydream a lot about possible ideas I could do. Unfortunatly most are great as daydreams, but stink if I attempt to put them down on paper/pixel. With this current idea I watched Ella Enchanted, which is sorta based on the Cinderella storyline. That gave me my current idea for a fic, one based extremely losely on that story.

I'll see how it goes, but maybe my two cents could be to just let an idea rest for a bit if your stuck, and maybe you'll be struck by an idea to make it work out.
If that advice stinks I bow to the knowledge of better writers, but it's working for me.

The Doctor
15th April 2006, 3:59 PM
Here's another tip concerning attacks.

One thing that's easy to get wrong is to merely describe the attacks like in Colosseum or XD. For example, Swords Dance. It's not going to be an illusion of swords clashing together then disappearing. Another example is Mean Look; it won't be just a big illusion of an eye.

My second point: when attacks are to be used. Come on, be realistic. Pokemon will not politely take turns in beating the crap out of each other. So in the same dynamic, Pokemon will not start off using defensive moves against each other. As an example, a Gardevoir may start with Light Screen, and a Scyther will follow with a Swords Dance. No. When a Pokemon uses a defensive move, it's either to repel attacks or to neutralise them.

Which brings me to my third point. If your character's Pokemon does use a defensive move like Light Screen, it will be at the last moment, deflecting the attack. In the episode "Solid As A Solrock", when Ash's Pikachu uses Thunderbolt, Liza's Lunatone casts Light Screen to deflect it. This next example features Swords Dance again. In "Gettin' The Bugs Out", Bugsy has his Scyther use Swords Dance to deflect Flamethrower.

I'm no't saying you can't use Swords Dance or any other moves forementioned normally, but the above serves as a dual purpose for the moves.

Hahahabvc87
20th June 2006, 10:32 AM
I was just going over my revision notes for my last exam tomorrow when I found something useful: the Gunning Fog index. It basically estimates how complex the words and sentences in your whole story are.

Step 1: Take 100 words from the story.

Step 2: Count the average number of words per sentence.

Step 3: Count the percentage of polysyllables (3 or more syllables), except:
a) proper nouns (names of people, places, stuff)
b) combination words (e.g. motorbike, another)

Step 4: (step 2 + step 3) X 0.4 = GF index

Score and what it means:

Below 7: Too simple.
7 - 13: Acceptable.
13 - 17; Complex.
Above 17: Very complex, virtually unreadable.

Ideal score for easily understandable fics: 10 - 12

Remember, this is only an estimate, so don't worry too much if the score is slightly off target. Hopefully this will help people design smooth-flowing stories!

Orange_Flaaffy
5th July 2006, 8:17 AM
I would do my editing the other way around, I only add and never delete. In my case it is never a matter of too much being written in one place but too little.
To add to the making pokemon seem real idea I think it is important to remember that pokemon can have character and still act and think alot like normal animals. Too many authors get into the habit of just making pokemon little people, which I've never liked much, unless they are human and pokemon mixes of some sort.
Being more animal like (like in the game and the manga) does not have to mean your pokemon would have any less character to work with, as anyone who has ever had a pet they loved knows :).

nashie1
7th July 2006, 7:31 PM
Pokemon shouldnt just be tools that only become important when captured. Any good writer that a character needs quirks and flaws and optionally a decent backstory so why souldn't pokemon? i was just saying that maybe authors could draw influence from real animals for some pokemon especially pokemon like Flaafy and Marrep who are based on sheep.

chosen_one386
27th July 2006, 12:24 AM
My three cents would be to add something special about your world in your fic, something not found in the games, anime, or manga.

For example (STEAL MY IDEA AND DIE!), in my fics, all of the people in Southern Japan (where the Pokemon world is) are half-Pokemon and half-human with the powers of the type they are.

For example, say, Christy is a fire type. She can use fire moves such as fire punch and blaze kick and so on. Plus, her normal body temperature is ten times greater than a regular human's is.

Make something origional up.

But, if I see my idea floating around in a fic somewhere and that fic is not mine, then I'll be mad.


Very mad....

Tezza
27th July 2006, 1:27 AM
Gosh, may as well advertise it. The Pidgeot in my link, Higher Pokemon Guide, is a disorganised list of tutes I composed. So far there are ones dedicated to better detail, a few definitions of Mary Sue and other tips.

Yami Ryu
27th July 2006, 1:51 AM
My three cents would be to add something special about your world in your fic, something not found in the games, anime, or manga.

For example (STEAL MY IDEA AND DIE!), in my fics, all of the people in Southern Japan (where the Pokemon world is) are half-Pokemon and half-human with the powers of the type they are.

Not only do most if not all- well not all-all writers, know to make a fic original. But Chosen, your idea has already been done 4356789845 times by as many or more authors. For animals, pokemon, myths, etc and so forth. Your attempt at originality, is already un original. To make it original you need to make the story itself original, or give it a good twist. :/ like 'Hoodwinked' was for Little Red Riding Hood, or Shrek for all the fairy tales. Things like that.

AgentChronon
28th July 2006, 3:09 PM
Here is my two or three cents. You don't have to agree with me. I reccomend just not using legendaries at all. Especially not capturing a legendary. Even if its like "OMG I DID NOT CAPTURE IT T3H LEGENDARY CAME TO ME CUZ I WAS NISE." I think that there should be no reason to really do that because that really takes away from the drama of the story. Another thing is you probably shouldn't rely on legendaries to provide drama, even if they're evil. That has already been done a lot too.

seiniyta
11th August 2006, 3:10 PM
My three cents would be to add something special about your world in your fic, something not found in the games, anime, or manga.

For example (STEAL MY IDEA AND DIE!), in my fics, all of the people in Southern Japan (where the Pokemon world is) are half-Pokemon and half-human with the powers of the type they are.
Very mad....

Did you know that DeviantArt has a special section for it? It is called anthro. Try it: type Anthro Pokemon in search bar.
So you can't be mad of using such characters.
Almost forgetting. try pokemorph.com. Many of those anthro's you can find there.

Xtra
26th August 2006, 6:51 PM
I'm the original Pucchiemon from Pojo (you spelled it wrong, by the way). And I don't mind you using a refrence from one of my old stories.

rybo5000
5th October 2006, 8:17 PM
Hi im currently writing my fanfic "The Jirachi Hunt" and no it isnt a starts his journey then ends with him as pokemon champion with loads of legendarys. No im trying to write it how pokemon would be like if it were real!
But anyway what i need is help on how to write battle scenes, below is basically what i wrote last time and it was crap
[QUOTE] Munchlax lunged foward with his fist outward, it striked Zubat in it's head and the injured pokemon shook and feel to the floor. Gastly then turned towards Bedlum, it's fangs exposed it flew forwards and bit it. [QUOTE]
And thats the improved version!!!!!! I know i desperatly need help, its hard to write battles!
HELP ME!

ShinyUmbreon10
6th October 2006, 10:06 PM
Thank you I have read and i will do. Sorry about the 1st chapter of my story.i am ten in real life and i hate to do all the grammer stuff. I will now do what the rules are.

Hahahabvc87
7th October 2006, 4:03 AM
rybo5000, take a look at "A Series of Pokemon Battles!" By Iceking and Tale. That should help you alot!

Kyuu-Tales
9th October 2006, 4:11 AM
I'd like to throw a few pennies into this intellectual piggy bank, if you don't mind. Nothing pleases me more than seeing others asking questions, striving to improve, or just making an honest attempt to take criticism as it comes (although many writers abhor the latter).

Firstly, re-read, re-read, re-read! I can't tell you how many times I've thought I was done with a scene or chapter afters days upon days of typing and hand cramps associated with it and BAM--a typo or grammatical error catches my eye. It is for this reason that all aspiring fanfiction writers (and veterans alike) have beta readers.

Generally, a beta reader is a trusted friend or fanfiction enthusiast who works alongside the writer in the eve of the writing process. A beta reader can help with almost any aspect of fanfiction, I for one have learned how essential they are to the success of a story the hard way.

My beta readers are not only my friends, but they are also the ones who put a "perverbial leash on my ego," so to speak. Simply, while my elders tend to praise my work with nothing more than a second glance, my betas are eager to tell me everything little detail that bothered them. Often times they object to my constant habit of over-complicating the simple and offer plausible alternatives. But we have a mutual relationship of sorts; I am more than willing to offer my services as an editor to the fray.

If and when you do manage to secure a beta reader, remember the golden rule: You do not have to take everything they suggest into consideration. The converse is also true--if you insist on ignoring every single word of constructive nay-say, your beta readers will most likely opt out on the argument that you're too immature to want to improve. I know that I would much rather spend my time doing other, more productive things if I was in such a situation.

That aside, I notice that one class of Pokemon fanfiction has yet to be addressed in this thread: Crossovers.

In the fanfiction community as a whole, crossovers have a dubious reputation as being the anti-thesis of canon virtue and sterility. Contrary to popular belief, crossovers are necessary and can be very enjoyable if precautions are taken and the story itself is well-written. For example, Kingdom Hearts is in many ways an assortment of individual crossovers combined into a unique, unprecedented and surprisingly thrilling whole. Crossovers can add a new dimension to what was old about Pokemon (or any canon for that matter) and make it new once again.

The following guidelines can be applied to any series, not just Pokemon (I will give examples from a collaborative-crossover AU Naruto-Bleach fanfiction project one of my betas and I are working on. My examples will involve Naruto and Bleach characters for this reason):

1. Clichés are the enemy. This is one of the reasons crossovers aren't liked. Don't just make characters interact in order to appease your curiosity.

Seriously, come up with a storyline besides, "ZOMG NARTUO FEL IN SUM DIMENSHONAL WURMHOLE & HELPZ ICHIGO FIGHT TEH HOLLOWZ!!1!11" or vice-versa because if you favor this archetype, any attempt at writing will be seen as futile. Fundamentally, a shallow plotline is a bad plotline.

Take the collab I'm working on, for example. My friend and I separated five characters (Naruto, Kiba, Ichigo, Renji and Shuuhei; if you were wondering) from the rest of the joint-cast and focused on their issues as teenagers in Tokyo (ah, the advantages and prospects of the AU genre). Not to say that their friends don't have their own issues, or that their teachers are saints among sinners, but it's more inconvenient to approach a story in an all-encompassing manner; that would make things too complicated. Which brings me to my next point---

2. An overly-broad scope is unyieldy and pointless. Don't shift your focus from character to character constantly, it's a hassle to reorient oneself on a scene-by-scene basis. And please--select one setting for the fic and stick to it! (Unless the canon in question is something like Kingdom Hearts or Resevoir Chronicle Tsubasa.) That doesn't mean you should narrow the focus to twenty-plus individual musings and pointless soliloquys of two characters throughout the entire story, but don't go so far as to write a chapter single-handedly narrating fifty-someodd characters' thought processes and get nowhere in doing so.

3. If you are one for the "suggestive genre", don't be afraid to experiment. A word of caution: There is such a thing as too much of a good thing; crack!pairings and crack!ships have a tendency to generate an ungodly number of flames on some sites.

4. Avoid using more than two series at a time when possible. This is a rule of thumb; a jumble of multiple series involving hundreds of characters has a habit of confusing a majority of your audience unless you write with the skill and poise of an Oxford graduate. (Again, Kingdom Hearts and Resevoir Chronicle Tsubasa are exceptions.)

5. Don't keep affiliation uniform. If the characters are supposed to work together, don't make things harder then they have to be. They shouldn't agree on everything, but they also shouldn't be excessively distrusting of foreigners because "S/he's different than me". (Outside of reason, in regard to the occasional friction between two or more characters, of course.)

Also, do not presume that villains will instantly become friends and form "an alliance made in hell" in an effort to destroy the heroes once and for all. Each antagonist has their own personal interests in mind and would typically be unable to reach a compromise with someone as like-minded as themselves goal-wise. (This is not always the case. Usuallly, if some sort of alliance is made, one person or side is often "pulling the strings" and doing a bulk of the decision-making in comparison to the other.)

Remember, not all things are black and white; a good guy from one series can be manipulated by the villain of another under false pretense, etcetera.

I guess that's all I have to say at the moment. Feel free to add to this or comment as seen fit. =3

rybo5000
9th October 2006, 7:08 PM
hi i said above that i needed help writing battles because until i learn how to my fanfic is blank!!!! lol
And that series of pokemon battles was no help as it was all humour and no battle!
I really need advice on how to write good battles! Please PM if you have a fanfic with an efffective battle scene or anything!
HELP!
Thanks bye

Orange_Flaaffy
10th October 2006, 3:17 AM
hi i said above that i needed help writing battles because until i learn how to my fanfic is blank!!!! lol
And that series of pokemon battles was no help as it was all humour and no battle!
I really need advice on how to write good battles! Please PM if you have a fanfic with an efffective battle scene or anything!
HELP!
Thanks bye

Try watching fighting action movies, or even better, play one of the pokemon games and then do some writing exercises where you flesh out how the battle happened by picturing it as if it really happened AKA why would such and such attack miss? If than attack they used had no effect how would the pokemon react? Does a basic attack like Tackle vary in style when different pokemon use it?
Watching the anime can also give you ideas :)

Mello
15th October 2006, 10:03 AM
Here's another little tip. Your going to build up tension, and get more reviews, if you end the chapters with cliffhangers. Don't do too many, as it'll get cliched over time, but build up some suspense. It makes a good story.

Also, another note on cliches. DON'T DO THEM. If you find your hands automatically going to type something, because you've typed it so many times before, it's getting old. Sometimes one cliche or two are funny, such as Wobbufett popping out of it's pokeball everytime TR say their motto, or Psyduck always getting in Misty's way, but don't do too many cliches. Even when you are deliberately doing them for humor, do it sparingly.

Also, give your characters weaknesses. Don't make them overpowerful. Even Mewtwo had weaknesses, and while he physically powerful, mentally, he didn't know anything of love. He made a great chatacter all the same.

Leon Phelps
15th October 2006, 2:29 PM
Here's another little tip. Your going to build up tension, and get more reviews, if you end the chapters with cliffhangers. Don't do too many, as it'll get cliched over time, but build up some suspense. It makes a good story.
That isn't always the best thing to do. Constant cliffhangers can be annoying, especially when they aren't needed. I understand if it's pivotal to the plot or if the chapter has been long enough, but otherwise they should be avoided.

nashie1
15th October 2006, 3:04 PM
My view on legendaries.
Don't use them. They can really ruin a story if not dealt with properly and are best left out completely.

If you do plan on using legendaries then here are a couple pointers:
*Never have them as starter pokemon.
*Never have a newbie trainer catch it in the first day of their adventure.
* Try to veer away from the character actually catching the legendary.

The first 2 especially can immediatly throw people off your story. After all would you buy a novel that can be summed up as "L0LZ im a n00b andz i cort a legendary, Ph34r my l33t skiLLz?."? Well?

Also, I need some help, my writing always seems to linear and boring, anyone got some tips to avoid this?

EDIT: Thought of another tip. Show don't tell. Which sounds better to you?
*Max and Amy woke up in a cage.
OR
*As Max and Amy woke up, they felt the cold metal beneath them and saw the unmistakable iron bars of a cage surround them from each side.

Orange_Flaaffy
22nd October 2006, 6:35 AM
If you are writing in first person make sure the characters thoughts match their age and background. A ten year old trainer from the breeding farm is not going to have the same wording in his thoughts and storytelling as a twenty year old Team Rocket member.
No matter how all knowing you think you are at seventeen chances are you are not going to be using uncommon thesaurus rich words in your every spoken word and how you view the world. Detail is one thing, but realism in point of view is important to :)

Willow's Tara
25th October 2006, 7:32 AM
I have a question, do you have to describe clothes everytime they change into a new one? Or even from the start of the fanfic?

Zephyr Flare
25th October 2006, 9:14 AM
Well how the heck wold a reader know otherwise?

The best way to do it however is drip feed the clothes descriptons, link them in with actions like the shoes with their pace for example, stops one solid block of text.

Sandra

Iveechan
25th October 2006, 11:11 AM
Unless the clothes are really important, don't put too much emphasis on their description. Really, I can never remember what a character is wearing in a fanfic, even when there's 5 paragraphs lovingly devoted to color of their socks.

SBaby
15th December 2006, 3:13 AM
Unless the clothes are really important, don't put too much emphasis on their description. Really, I can never remember what a character is wearing in a fanfic, even when there's 5 paragraphs lovingly devoted to color of their socks.

I couldn't have said it better myself. Usually, I give a very general description of a character and let the reader's imagination fill in the blanks.

Classic example, Elnius (a new Pokemon in one of my Fics). She is human-sized, has light blue skin, long blue hair, and she wears a helmet over her eyes (it might have been a visor). She also wears a silver and blue breastplate, and seems to have small panels on her arms and shoulders, in an almost robotic fashion.

I don't explain the particulars of whether the breastplate is spiked, or whether the helmet is removable or not. I leave those details up to the imagination of the reader and only explain the important things (that'll be used in the story). That way, I don't bog them down in small details that detract from the battle that might be going on at that point.

BirthdayPirate
19th December 2006, 4:56 AM
I couldn't have said it better myself. Usually, I give a very general description of a character and let the reader's imagination fill in the blanks.

Classic example, Elnius (a new Pokemon in one of my Fics). She is human-sized, has light blue skin, long blue hair, and she wears a helmet over her eyes (it might have been a visor). She also wears a silver and blue breastplate, and seems to have small panels on her arms and shoulders, in an almost robotic fashion.

I don't explain the particulars of whether the breastplate is spiked, or whether the helmet is removable or not. I leave those details up to the imagination of the reader and only explain the important things (that'll be used in the story). That way, I don't bog them down in small details that detract from the battle that might be going on at that point.

Well, that's all fine and dandy with Pokemon, but with humans you can pretty much just ignore clothes. Unless you're trying to show that a man is gay or a woman is poor or something like that, clothes don't even really need to be mentioned...

Zephyr Flare
19th December 2006, 11:26 AM
But in some situations can help build up their character, a scene, a motve or even suspense in some cases.

'Pends how you wrangle it.

Sandra

DANdotW
19th December 2006, 6:00 PM
I agree. If there is just a general description, then it's all gone.

However, if you slow it down, it'll be taken in better. Also improving your writing.

Julie had blonde hair and a yellow shirt and blue jeans and black shoes.

~~~~~~~~~~

Julie flicked back her long, blonde hair.

Her green eyes flashed with emotion.

The rain soaked through her yellow shirt, mixing with the dirt already on there and becoming an off cream.

She kicked the tree, scuffing her black laced boots.

Gives you a lot more, you see?

Iota

~*Mudkip Fantastic*~
4th January 2007, 6:14 PM
In most fics I have read people start a new paragraph when someone new speaks. Is that a requirement?

Zephyr Flare
4th January 2007, 6:29 PM
It's generally considered good gramar which is why many do it, also stops it being lost in text blocks.

Sandra

SBaby
5th January 2007, 3:30 AM
I consider seperate paragraphs for new speakers to kind of be a general rule of thumb in really any type of writing. It's not technically a requirement, but those two extra key presses really make Fics look way better. I personally think it just makes the story easier to read.

Negrek
5th January 2007, 3:38 AM
It's actually a rule of the language, and you should abide by it for the sake of everybody's eyes and sanity. If you've ever tried to make sense of a conversation where four different speakers are discussing something in one paragraph, you'll know what I mean.

Dragonfree
5th January 2007, 8:53 AM
Well, I can think of a couple of exceptional cases where it would definitely be appropriate to put them on the same line (or at least inappropriate to insert a paragraph break), but that would be some unconventional use of the language either way.

CrystalSaurTower
1st March 2007, 8:54 PM
Well, that's all fine and dandy with Pokemon, but with humans you can pretty much just ignore clothes. Unless you're trying to show that a man is gay or a woman is poor or something like that, clothes don't even really need to be mentioned...

I don't see how clothes could describe whether a person's gay or not. It depends on how you describe situations around other people. My super goth anti-hero could be dressed in all clad pink but you still have no idea whether he's or not hes gay, unless your thinking about gays as a whole as stereotypes, which isn't advised in writing anyway.

SBaby
20th March 2007, 8:42 AM
I don't see how clothes could describe whether a person's gay or not.

Two words: Seymour Cheese. Do I really need to explain that one further?

Anyway, describing the clothes is fine for fan characters and anyone else you add to a Fic, such as enemies or whatever. But describing Pokemon, especially new ones, is extremely important and should not be overlooked, especially when they're performing an action (that's the perfect time to make the description really creative).

As for anyone else, it's your decision, but you don't necessarily need to describe them in an overabundance of detail. For instance, everyone here knows what Ash looks like. This wouldn't be much of an official site if that wasn't the case.

So a brief description (one to two sentences) should suffice for the initial introduction in that case, unless they're doing something at that time (hair blowing in wind, etc...), or have different outfits or the like (in one of my older Fics, Ash had a different outfit, since he was older).

CrystalSaurTower
20th March 2007, 9:17 PM
Two words: Seymour Cheese. Do I really need to explain that one further?

Since I have abseloutly no idea about who or what that is, yes please. And mind telling what people who er' gay where, since you so strongly think of clothes as an option.

edwardel
21st March 2007, 5:45 AM
Where? What do you mean where?

Yes, with fakemon, you should decribe all important aspects (clothes if need be) because nine chapters down you may think to yourself you want your pokemon to blend in to the pimp suit you're wearing. If that is the case you should have already described any important aspects ahead of time.

Don't have the 16 year old that is the most bueatiful and the smartest girl in school and both of her parents died then followed by her brother but she never shows any hints of a loss. This is more of the mary-sue character that was talked about earlier in the thread.

And a question if I may. In terms of what would be frowned upon by comments once it was up would a crime syndicate motivated by some uber,
training at academy, and journeys with the purpose being to stop a handful of crooks all be too cliche?

Griffinkit
21st March 2007, 2:28 PM
Well, I have a story where the four main characters (based off me, my sister, and two of our friends) all started out with legendaries. However, each of them only knows a very weak attack (long story). Also, I made the professor evil...(long story again)

I think an eccentric character or one who doesn't know much about Pokemon can be interesting. In this one online RP, I have a charrie who is basically crazy, wears all white, has never seena Pokedex, and thinks Starly are Dark-types. And she uses rather superfluous language. And there's another one, a demon, who calls Pokemon "vassals" and has never seen one before. She's rather fierce and a bit scary, and has "no use for emotions."

So, yeah. Charries knowing nothing about Pokemon=coolness.

GinnyFishy
31st March 2007, 7:29 AM
I have a character in a story (hasn't been posted on serebii yet) where she has defeated Team Rocket sometimes with the help of her friend Silver. But she also has no pokemon, and has no clue who are her parents. Would this be a mary-sue character?

Zephyr Flare
31st March 2007, 11:19 AM
The best way to give a rough idea, try that Mary Sue test in the Author's Cafe sicne you know far more about the character. it won;t be eprfect but should give you a rough idea :)

Sandra

nashie1
6th April 2007, 4:28 PM
It's not a mary-sue (at least not from what you've said so far) However, the whole 'I don;t know who my parents are' thing is kind of cliche and overused.
(So is finding out the long lost parents are the big bad guys just for the record.)

Orange_Flaaffy
3rd May 2007, 4:21 AM
What makes a Mary Sue is not so much your character's past as it is how you write that character. Aka, a character could be pretty and nearly everyone could be in love with her but as long as that does not have other characters acting like they would never dream of to win her love (like say, Ash jumps off a cliff in grief, or kills Pikachu), it could make an okay character. Basically, if the world changes for the character (say they are in space and she just happens to know how to work a rocket for not reason without having any training) rather the character being changed by the world (a spoiled rich girl has to learn to cook on a camp fire to be a pokemon trainer, the shoes she never goes without are awful for walking give her blisters etc)

Basically, a Mary sue is a character who is never wrong, and the only things that hurt her are things that aren’t her fault. A good character's growth comes from mistakes that they made and have no one else to blame for but themself (Of course, they can blame others but it would not be true ;). Everyone loves to blame someone else).

Example:
A character gets kidnapped by..Team Rocket. (These are just samples, I don't really write like this)
--------------------------------------------
Mary Sue was just sleeping in her tent when The Big Evil Rocket Member, seeing how pretty she was, decided to steal her away! A moment later her friends woke up, no longer feeling Mary Sues golden glow, Oh no, who will save Mary Sue?
---------------------------------------------------------

Alice had gotten up in the middle of the night from her friend's tent...If you could call them friends, she was sure at least half of them only looked after her because her parents made them promise to.
Her reasons for not sleeping were perfectly clear: All she cared about was getting the best pokemon and the best of the best only came out at night here.
She was chasing blindly after the HootHoot in a power hungry rage moments later (never mind that she forgot to bring any pokeballs), when she lost her footing in the grass and triped.

"Well, well, what do with have here?" Remarked the Rocket sleepily.

"A new trainer your going to let go like this never happened?" Peeped Alice

"I don't think so." He replied

The next morning the other trainers only took a moment to call Alice's parents and journey on....

*lol* Bad I know, but I hope that helps just a little.

*suddenly feels like writing a much better verison of the Alice character story*

Cenzo
19th July 2007, 11:08 PM
Can anyone give me some advice on how to get people to comment on my fic?

edwardel
20th July 2007, 12:07 AM
Ask for them nicely?

Psychic
20th July 2007, 12:35 AM
If someone WANTS to comment, then they will. If nobody comments, either wait longer or just live with it. You already got a good few responses, more than some people ever get.

If you really want more reviews, go to the Fanfiction Reviewer Thread and PM a reviewer there who is open to taking requests.


~Psychic

Orange_Flaaffy
20th July 2007, 2:16 AM
I agree, one or two faithfull readers is all you can really hope for :). The reveiwers topic is also good but don't think that just becuase they reveiwed one chapter they will stay for all the rest of them :\

Purgatory
12th September 2007, 4:24 PM
8, Killing off all the characters - this could be seen as a cop-out designed to avoid the hassle of writing a sequel. If you must kill characters off, make sure the deaths advance the plot in some way. But don't kill characters just because you've come to dislike them; think of some other way to write them out of the story if you really want to get rid of them.


This one made me laugh a bit actually - Hamlet anyone? (and for the record: yes, I have read it; yes, I loved it.)

This is all great stuff, especially for those who have yet to try their wings at writing if you know what I mean. Some of the stuff is very, very obvious things (such as "newbie trainers will not have a legendary pokémon), but if you guys thinks it needs to be pointed out, that's all right I guess.

Here are some of my own tips. I beg your pardon if similar tips have been posted before, I didn't see any of this in the original post and I don't have the time right now to go through six pages of replies. Anyway:

* One thing I'd like to warn people of is a pitfall I've fallen into myself, and I've seen a lot of others do the same thing - not only fanfiction writers, but also published authors: getting too descriptive. It's easy to just keep writing, even if you don't know how to continue the plot, but don't do a Stephen King (as in: start to describe a small, most likely irrelevant detal for several pages), especially not if you're writing something like a pokémon fanfiction. Some people like this kind of storytelling, but most likely a reader will find it confusing and boring. In short: description is fine, but keep it relevant.

* If you get stuck, don't kick yourself too hard. We all get stuck now and then, and it's only sensible, especially if you've been wrtining several pages over the last couple of days. I like to take a walk, to sort some things out in my head, or just step away from the computer and do something else for a while.

* More often than not, my ideas comes to me at bad times. When I'm at schoor or at work, sitting in the car and so on - anywhere I usually don't have access to my laptop, simply. Also, by the time I get home and can sit down and write, the idea will be gone. If this keeps happening to you, just scribble down a couple of words from your idea, either on a scrap of paper or on your mobile phone, just enough so you can bring back the memory as soon as you get home to your computer. This will only take a minute, and save you a lot of frustration, plus it could also salvage a really cool idea for your story.

That's all I had for now, keep up the good work guys!

Dilasc
26th November 2007, 10:10 PM
After starting theatre college courses this semester, I have begun to relook many things about writing over these past few months. Namely I'm thinking about PURPOSE! Purpose is a lesson that the stroy tries to teach, or it's the values the characters represent. That is why we write and take pride in our work: it represents many of our values and want to share them with the world. Characters who are 'just there' really tend to irk me. As an actor, I had such a role to play, and I just said 'Gee, this character sucks. He really has no goals, he has some blandly funny comic relief value and he hugs a prostitute. No wonder this guy's work is only "experimental" in nature.'

So basically, saying "A transvestite would be really fun to write, even if she serves no purpose. I'll make her a main character too." That's great, but what does this character represent? What meaning or challenges must this character overcome with its mixed and confused genderal existanc?

On the flipside, the plot overall needs a purpose, and almost 57% of the going ons you write about should bring about pathway to the plot. If not, then the 37% is subplot. Barring that the remaining 6% is perhaps moments of pointless humor and maybe a life lesson here or there.

Of course, the lessons or thoughts your story provides should be genuine. If it's "With teh lurve of my pogeymans with the pokey and the man, we will triumph," then why do you believe that? Everything needs a reason. A mere intention is not enough for as I've been told "The road to hell is paved with good intentions." I unfortunately do not remember the source it comes from.

As an actor in training, I find that acting your work out can really help you figure out what to do or the path to follow.

I wonder how many authors would be stumped if I asked them: What is the plot objective you are trying to portray to your audience?

Now mark, a good show is still a good show if it's entertaining, but those that strike home with a deep message are the stories and plays that are remembered forever... well those and plays that revolutionize new styles such as Shakespeare.

Also, literary representation can be EXTREMELY powerful. A fire can represent passion, and thunder can represent power, and maybe eleven billion droplets of blood can represent the souls of humans who once lived and the purpose they may have lived for. These words on their own can be very provocative of powerful emotions. Try some day to take advantage of them to nail a point deep into a reader's soul; suddenly you're on the path to shaping the world.

The trick is to draw them into the story before you compound the powerful dialogue! That's one of my problems and I won't deny it, I begin with powerful words and I may not ease up.

All in all, think with objective I suppose. Having a purpose can greatly increase your DESIRE to write on top of showing the world the true you.

We all get caught up in grammar that we forget that every person has a story to tell, or maybe they want to say something yet don't know how to do so in an original manner.


Now to veer towards characters a bit, here's a saying I made up: "Writing characters is great because you get to show everyone a slight bit of you in each and every one of them. It's up to them to find which aspects hide in each." In other words, if you know yourself, write a bit of your soul into each character's personality. Don't have everyone be the same, but it's your story, make your mark as yourself inside the story, not by pissing ontop of it if that makes sense. Though I guess not every character has to be you. Maybe they're based on a parent, or a friend, or someone you know. Great! Mix them about, take your sarcastic nature and mix it with your friend's love for basketball, and you'll have a true ball-busting hybrid!

Don't be afraid to experiment. Go over the top if you have to, that's how I'm told to audition. It's now going to be how i write as well.

palkia1
5th December 2007, 5:58 AM
I need some advice on my new fic. I am just finishing up my first one and the reviewers i have had mentioned that the plot went by too fast and things happened too quickly. The overall story was about 50,000 words. The main problem was that in each chapter a major event happened. I need some way to make the plot reach on longer, something to fill in some chapters, like a detour from the main events of the plot of some sort.

My next fic is a story about Oak and Agatha when they were kids. They travel through Kanto together and they realise that strange things are happening around them so they try and figure out what's going on and they nd up battling against an evil organisation.

I was wondering if anyone had any tips about how i can extend the plot of this fic. It is similar to a journey fic when a trainer gets a Pokemon and goes on a journey. Does anyone have any ideas for extending the plot because i would like to make this fic longer

kingferret53
27th February 2008, 9:20 PM
One of the ways I try to avoid Sueishness and to add interest is to give someone flaws. The Seven Deadly Sins really help if you can't decide on something. In case you don't know, they're Pride, Lust, Anger, Envy, Sloth, Gluttony, and Greed. If you want to add one good feature to your bad guys, the Seven Virtues are Faith, Hope, Charity, Temperance, Fortitude, Justice, and Prudence - remember that your bad guys need good points too. I had an MS that I made into a developed char by using Pride (she's selfish) and Anger (she has a temper) - now she's not only more fun to write, she behaves like a real person.

Aaaand that's all I have to say. Good luck with all your fics!

YES! I am more or less obsessed with the 7 deadly sins and (not so much) the 7 holy virtues. In fact I have made a pokemon team based on the sins and one of my charectors in the fan fic I am writing is completely based on the 7 sins.

Now my questions. What if you have no beta reader? And how do you accurately describe battles and scenes of destruction without going overboard or making it boring?

Putty
16th June 2008, 10:18 AM
Can anyone give me some advice on how to get people to comment on my fic?
critique somebody elses piece and leave a link to yours at the end asking them nicely for a return.

don't just leave a 'dis r kl nao krit myn pl0x', critique somebody's piece in the way that you would want yours to be critiqued.

GarchompHata
15th July 2008, 3:05 AM
I want to write fan fic so much. I love writing, but I dont think I can. Any Help? My main problem is organizing it into paragraphs

Dusk, the Twilit Wanderer
24th August 2008, 1:21 AM
Whenever there is a break as things swich subjects, there should be a new paragraph. Whenever someone begins to talk, there should be a new paragraph. And lastly if your instinct tells you there should be a new paragraph, there should be a new paragraph.

Does that help?

Morgie04086
13th September 2008, 10:09 AM
Wow, this has made em realize how much I already knew. Coming into writing I thought I was such a noob, not the other way around. Don't take this the wrong way, I still don't think I'm great. but when I go back and read I realize how much I did correctly. I still found lots of new advice from people and I thank you. The main tip was to keep writing even in the absence of reviewers. That's tough. I've only had one or two comments so far but I will keep writing. THANK YOU!

Zephyr Flare
13th September 2008, 10:38 AM
It's a bit like artwork where admittedly it's more obvious, you'll keep improving throughout your writting lifetime whether you realise it or not then cringe at your older stuff :) Sometimes ya just need a nudge in the right direction.

Sandra

Me_Love_Eevee!
13th September 2008, 6:19 PM
Hello, I'm Me_Love_Eevee! I recently joined the Serebii Forums and I not long ago posted my own Fan Fiction called "My Pokemon World". Someone who commented on my story/script said that I needed to read this thread. If it wouldn't be so much trouble, could you check my story/script and tell me where I have gone wrong and what I could do to improve it. If you want to check my story/script out, go on to my profile and on my about me and my thread will be in my signature. Thank you so much for reading this message, I hope you can help me.

Me_Love_Eevee!
13th September 2008, 6:22 PM
Hello, I'm Me_Love_Eevee! I recently joined the Serebii Forums and I not long ago posted my own Fan Fiction called "My Pokemon World". Someone who commented on my story/script said that I needed to read this thread. If it wouldn't be so much trouble, could you check my story/script and tell me where I have gone wrong and what I could do to improve it. If you want to check my story/script out, go on to my profile and on my about me and my thread will be in my signature. Thank you so much for reading this message, I hope you can help me.

Zephyr Flare
13th September 2008, 6:35 PM
Please look in the Author's Cafe area where there's a thred for locating reviewers you can PM a request to, this thread is entirely for the giving of general writting advice rather than a specific fanfiction.

Sandra

Kamex
14th September 2008, 12:48 AM
I was wondering about something. I've been writing a chaptered fic, but so far I'm on the prologue. The material I'm writing for the prologue fits the definition of a prologue well, except that it happens to be long. Really long. Like, at least 15 pages, probably more.

So my question is, would having an extremely long prologue like that make it not a prologue, or is it totally up to me whether it can be called one or not? It would be a shame if I had to just include it in the story as the first chapter, because I want it to sort of stand alone as 'pre'-events, years before the actual story starts. I was thinking maybe I could split it up into different sections, like "Part I" and "Part II", etc., but I dunno. I just want to make sure this is the best way to go about it (or at least a possible way to go about it).

Psychic
15th September 2008, 9:05 AM
Prologues are defined by what's in them, not by their length. Most people don't have long prologues, but it's still perfectly okay; so long as it's taking place before the story really begins, it still counts as a prologue.

~Psychic

Kamex
16th September 2008, 4:52 AM
Prologues are defined by what's in them, not by their length. Most people don't have long prologues, but it's still perfectly okay; so long as it's taking place before the story really begins, it still counts as a prologue.
Okay, cool. That's what I thought, but I'm glad I asked to make sure. Thanks a lot.

Matori
26th September 2008, 11:54 PM
Okay, a bit late to this thread, but as an on/off writer, thought I'd share some of my advice.

- Don't get discouraged if writers' block strikes. If you feel like you can't write any more words, step away from the piece a while and come back later. You may have some new ideas or a new way to look at it. Don't force it, though, or dwell on not being able to write. Neither will work.

- Mary Sue litmus tests, the survey-style kind where it tallies your results at the end, tend to be full of it. They don't account for context or a writer's skills and instead depend on "character does x, x, and x, and is x, and therefore they are a Mary-Sue" A good writer can create a character with all the stereotypical Mary Sue traits but have them be very well written and believable. Just trust your own instincts when writing a character.

- Don't be afraid to get inspiration from other works. Big authors do it all the time and it's all a matter of how you write the story and make it your own. I have an original character inspired by the Hogwarts ghosts from Harry Potter (with a story and personality as colorful as theirs), except they're a... Team Rocket headquarters ghost. However, by putting my own spin on the idea of quirky ghosts, she's entirely my own.

- Don't be afraid to find your own style. Everyone has their own voice and it makes reading fanfiction that much better.

- Above all, never get discouraged. Writing should be fun and if you let it become nothing more than a quest for more readers and reviews, it's lost a little of its soul then. Write for yourself, then the reader. Readers can tell when the writer is enjoying his or herself, and when you enjoy what you write, it will be so much the better.

The Sarge
22nd October 2008, 3:12 PM
Hi, I just have one real question. What is a good way to start a story? That is by far my weakest point.

Putty
22nd October 2008, 3:20 PM
plan every little detail first. writing the actual thing should take no time whatsoever. don't think of some teeny idea and start writing building up on it. come up with a teeny idea and develop it with little cute diagrams with extending arms linking to expansions. focus on the characters and how they develop throughout the story, focus on the themes, focus on the actual plot and how it's going to continue.
don't dive straight into writing something because you'll make the mistake that stephanie meyer did. thing is, people are too ridiculously stupid to realise how mediocre she is because society is horrid.

The Sarge
22nd October 2008, 3:51 PM
I already have that stuff. I meant the actuall writing, I just never know how to start it.

Zephyr Flare
22nd October 2008, 4:18 PM
It's the start with art really, you have this blank canvas infront of you but what line should go first? Often the best idea is to just smack some lines down, make a complete mess and tidy as you go along and just run with it :) You could always start with an event such as the age old cliche of Journey fics, getting the first mon, some open with what the main character is up to or in RT's case a Grumpig died...

It isn't easy but you can also just write and edit back into a format you like more.

Sandra

The Sarge
22nd October 2008, 4:34 PM
So make it up as I go. Got it lol.

Zephyr Flare
22nd October 2008, 5:17 PM
Well you can go back and edit :) It's a lot eaiser to muck about with existing writting and smack it into shape as the page doesn't look blank anymore and you can cut and paste things tog et it how you like.

Sandra

Psychic
22nd October 2008, 11:12 PM
There is no real, official way to start a story: everybody does it differently. Some people find it helpful to plan the whole thing out first, some people write a few pages and then go through it and scrap half of what they wrote, some people just start with a scene that pops into their head - you don't even have to know where you're going it. There really is no universal way for everyone, because everyone has their own way of writing.

Just experiment with different things - eventually you'll find something. ^^

~Psychic

Lycanthropy
7th November 2008, 6:34 AM
Thank you, This was really helpful. I am going to make a fanfic. And now it's good to have some guide lines on how to go about it.

#Chimecho#
15th December 2008, 4:38 AM
I also have a bit of advice coming from one who enjoys reading. It is also good to have a good opening sentence, a good first word. I am not saying that you need to over analyze it and make it spectacular. However, you should have a beginning that "Hooks, lines and sinks" the reader into your writing. Since most of the fanfics are short stories, a good beginning isn't required to much, cause after a few paragraphs you can get into the story. However, a good opening can be the difference between a hundred people reading your fic, than fifty. Some might open it, read the first line and think "Ah, something better is probably out there."

Jump right away into the story line is what i am trying to say in to many words (not a follower of what i preach i guess ha!!)

For example:

The sun shone bright over the hill; as the flowers danced against the wind that blew gently overhead.

Jack woke up. His eyes adjusted to the bright sun shining over the hill. A gentle breeze blew up his shirt and through the field, making the flowers dance.

Which one did you enjoy more? Whichever one it may be, you enjoyed reading and wanted to keep reading more of it. Which is the point i am trying to make. Suck the readers in with your first line, and perhaps even the first word. But don't over analyze it to much, otherwise you might destroy what you wanted to say.

Here is where I got the words to explain what i am trying to say. So it might be better for you to read it and get your own ideas from it.

"Your opening should include:

* Your main characters. Don't wait for a few chapters to introduce your main characters. At least foreshadow them.
* Your main characters must have some sort of conflict or stress they are undergoing. Let the action begin quickly.
* Your main characters antagonist. You want your readers to start to choose up sides.
* What's at stake? This should be revealed early on to build suspense and work towards your climax.
* The setting. Don't go on an on for pages about the setting though. Nothing stops a reader cold in his tracks then a lot of description and no action.
* Set your tone. Don't start out 'all melodramatic' and then switch to humorous.
* The ending should be foreshadowed. Give them a reason to read to the end.
"

"#

The first ten pages of any work are crucial. They are what busy editors see when they rip open your envelope -- snatched irritably from a huge pile that came in that morning. Editors must decide in minutes, perhaps moments, whether you deserve closer attention than all the other aspiring authors in the day's slush pile. If your first few pages sing out professionalism and skill -- grabbing the reader with a vivid story right away -- the editor may get excited. Even if the next chapter disappoints, she'll at least write you a nice letter.

Alas, she won't even read those first ten pages if the first page isn't great! And that means the first paragraph has to be better still. And the opening line must be the best of all."

raichu6
3rd January 2009, 8:33 PM
To people, who make bad short fan fics and they get locked, go to another site. I was here years ago and made a fool out of myself making tons of fan fics time after time getting them locked.
so if you don't improve you should make them on another website and someday when you are much better you can come back.

raichu6
3rd January 2009, 8:41 PM
To people, who make bad short fan fics and they get locked, go to another site. I was here years ago and made a fool out of myself making tons of fan fics time after time getting them locked.
so if you don't improve you should make them on another website and someday when you are much better you can come back.

Arceusdude222
15th January 2009, 6:46 PM
Hmm, i recognise and see where you're comming from, Zephyr Flare, i just thought i'd point out that you haven't any advice for those of us who are writing fanfics from the pokemon's eyes, like i was, and still am trying to do, you may want to think about that, i rspect you and all the other mods and staffs choices, i just thought i'd point that out.

#Chimecho#
18th January 2009, 1:14 AM
For Point of View:

PenguinBeam- I think you should try every point of view before sticking with just one. You never know...you might find that you like writing in one more than another, and that becomes the way you write the rest of your stories. (I hope that makes sense. I've never given advice before. That was my first attempt, lol.)

Shiny Venusaur- Get to know your characters so its easier to write in a different PoV for them.

Bay- Experiment with all POV (first, second, third). See which ones you like best and also learn how each one requires a bit of different writing style.

Psyrose3 - Don't change your PoV in the middle of a story, because it's gonna leave at least one person reading it wondering what the heck happened...

PokemonHero -
Advice for writing in the first-person:
-Try to put yourself in the mind of the character as you write. Make their thoughts your thoughts. Think about what is going on the scene you're writing and make your thoughts match. You wouldn't be thinking about what for dinner when you are cornered by some knife-wielding foe (at least I wouldn't...).
-Do not be afraid to describe things. Whenever the protagonist from whom's perspective you are writing this from enters a new location, describe everything you possibly can. Sights, smells, tastes, feelings...put as much detail as you feel a normal person would take notice to.

PokemonMaster -Experiment...? I'm not good for dolling out advice - But it never stops me.

#Chimecho#- We shouldn't limit ourselves. In both ways. Limiting what POV we write in, and limiting our power to write with only one POV. These are the main two conflicting ideas that are great.

Naming Characters:

#Chimecho#- Let your Characters name themselves.

They are their own person. Sounds crazy, but ask them if they like the name or if it fits them. Try different names, or just let them talk to you. You control them, so at least let them have some control of something eh? ^^


Great Advice to Continue On:

Stoc15-Remember, new authors, follow your dreams and you will suceed!

Air Dragon- Before you get going, try to mould yourself into several different personalities on paper. See which ones you can work best with. Then work on expanding it.
Don't limit yourself. After all, limits are illusions... if it weren't for gravity, man could fly.
Get some more vocabulary by reading a book every chance you get. Yes, dictionaries are included...
What?
Learn to show the reader what happens, don't just describe it in one sentence That just doesn't work.
Don't feel frustrated when nobody likes your first attempt. Good stuff takes time and practice to write. Just get up and try again.

#Chimecho#- I think we limit ourselves too much. Don't undervalue your talent. I wish I could write thrid person better, and most of you here write it. I don't really envy though, because i love what i write. That i think is also important in writing. Learn to love what you write, while being humble about it and taking in criticism and learning to become better.

Air Dragon
25th January 2009, 8:13 PM
I'm occasionally crap at giving advice. But seeing my words posted by another has given me fresh heart. So let's review the topics pople usually ask me on in Fanfiction writing.

Obviously, to protect anonymity, some names are changed.


STRETCHING THE IMAGINATION: CREATING A CONTINENT

Question:When you created Corei, how did you go about the process?

You were right: creating a continent is a project, but I’ll take it step by step in the best way I can...

1. The Land: nothing's more important on a journey than a map... so a quick sketch of a map of Fakeland's going to help loads... it doesn't have to be fancy either... when i sketched Corei's map, I followed the layout you normally see in the games without the zoom in factor as to where everything is...

what your looking to attain here is basically what kind of geographic regions will be predominant at each stage of the journey, the cities names (have fun here... mixing different languages like Japanese, Spanish, German, French and others to create city names can help make a huge impact not to mention keep the reader guessing what type of challenge they face until it's too late i.e. the battle's begun. e.g. Wataoi City (WATer + AOI (Blue in JP) sounds like a cool place for a water type gym city which has plenty of sunshine and a tropical aura about it) and in the case of the gym league challenge, how the trip between gym towns is going to be...

2. The Pokemon: when you get the land laid out ok, next will be the Pokémon. You’re aiming for a round a little over 200, right? Basically you'll need a good idea of how many of those 200 are self made, and how they are distributed...

e.g.: mongles are obviously found in forests with Ravow, Spinocle and Litaire while pyrika, fryger, geosel and rushir are found in the rough and desert terrains...

3. The people: ok, this was definitely the fun part... the people's lifestyles is predominantly based on the land where their gym is located (point 1). If you recall R/S/E, Fortree was a city built in the trees. Thus, everyone seemed connected to nature and felt highly vibrant. Those who dwell in Dinocanyon would most likely be a little on the pale side as most of the working days would be spent under ground.

4. The Gym leaders: They are the epitome of their people's lifestyles and are the ones to which their cities' heritages are entrusted to safeguard. Their gyms reflect the element on which their towns are located and their Pokémon are those who adapt to fighting on the terrain or can be trained to do so easily. Make a list of the Gym cities, outlining each one with the following (I’ll give an example, feel free to use it...):

City Name: Wataoi City
Leader:Arylla
Type: Water
Pokémon (Here, giving the Pokémon levels will help create a level of hierarchy amongst the gym leaders. Say Wataoi is the sixth gym challenge, it could go something like this:)
32 Spheal
32 Horsea/Seadra
30 Chinchou/Lanturn
35 (own Water type)
Badge: Tide
Level unlocked (optional, even unneeded in fic): >Lv 70 under control
HM usable (also optional- there usually is an HM available for use after the gym victory): Surf/Dive

Something like that. Now let's look at the Pokémon used- Chincou and Horsea lines are common to tropical places, but Spheal? This could introduce a personality quirk of the leader: while the land is sunny and warm Arylla could be a complainer, cold and a little appraising of her opposition. Yet she's not heartless-merely tough to the core.

Also take note of which already created Pokémon you use here... it'll help in the next part...

5. The Pokédex: now we get to the heart of the matter. The Fakeland-Dex. Let's start with the fundamentals: first you have the starters: grass, fire and water. Then we go further into the local bugs, quadrupeds and fliers. Then you can fan out a little more, introduce the pokemon in the order that they'd have most likely have been discovered; the more common ones first and moving onto the rarer ones as you go.

Next you have to mix it up. Start with the pokemon the gym leaders used and their evolution lines. They must be local to Fakeland or it'll look suspicious.... illegal pokemon trading anyone? LOL...

Then you go into the recurring species and their families: zubat, pikachu, magikarp, ponyta, geodude, onix, gligar, phanpy, machop, goldeen, psyduck, skarmory... you get the drift, basically those main characters and villains of the anime have. I'll email you mine so you can get an idea of what I’m talking about...

So! Basically, that's how I made up Corei! Add to that an evil organization (optional, it would make a first!), and a plot line, and you're all set!

Note: The following discussions took place during Yahoo Messenger chats. Hence the dialogue-like script and ultra-poor grammar


LECTURE ON POT... I MEAN, PLOT!

Air Dragon: wow. Flattered though I am, I occasionally get stuck on a scene myself.
Air Dragon: ok, let me try to share what I do...
Air Dragon: first of all, I write out the entire story, in extremely highlighted cliffnote version
Anyone who is interested: Meaning?
Air Dragon: for example:
Air Dragon: for tcq it was like: sapph arrives at corei and meets haley and kamren.
Air Dragon: Sapph arrives late and receives mongle
Air Dragon: sapph catches ledyba in forest
Air Dragon: sapph meets joy jr in forest
Air Dragon: you get the idea... basically, you write out a chapter or major scene in one line or less
Air Dragon: do this for the whole fic, outlining major captures and (gym) battles...
Air Dragon: when it comes to the gyms, adding the leader and his/her type helps out more
Air Dragon: things change, as do your decisions, so feel free to change them if they haven't come into the story at the time
Air Dragon: all this should be done on paper, mind...
Air Dragon: next, you flesh out the scene... add minor plot lines and scenes.
Air Dragon: a good example of this would be when anuvi and ledyba got sidetracked by the hippie hedgehog Pokémon and anuvi got 'high' on mushrooms
Air Dragon: with me so far?
Anyone who is interested: Yep.
Air Dragon: so much can change in a fic... for example, I was apprehensive when it came to character deaths, now I'm more comfortable around it since Trey bolton's death in ch 24,
Air Dragon: especially since the movie chapters will have a couple more deaths in it. Highly violent ones, tbh
Air Dragon: also the gym leader and battle results changed emphatically over time. Before I started, gym 1 was going to be an ice gym. lhi and chen were leaders no 2, switching places with arlene, who was then no 6
Air Dragon: laena's name at the time was samantha (final gym leader) and she wasn't royalty
Air Dragon: fuego was a girl named vulca, but I made vulca a top executive of team shadow and made that leader a male instead
Air Dragon: sapph also wasn't supposed to lose to lhi and chen, but I did so on a whim, planning for him to learn a few vital lessons during his match with herbert sr.
Air Dragon: even now, I'm planning to change the name of the zap badge o the lightning badge, a change to be effected in ch 35
Air Dragon: and the elemens thing wasn't going to happen at all. it just helped explain anuvi, arcana and crimson's abnormal power levels
Air Dragon: so you see, things can change all the time. just get the basic idea down and build on it from there
Air Dragon: too much?
Air Dragon: you might wanna copy and paste the whole lecture. I am.
Air Dragon: one more thing I'd like to share: crimson wasn't going to evolve until the 7th gym, but that'd make no sense. at all. bugs evolve too quickly, anyways.


PSYCHIC NON-PSYCHICS?

Anyone who is interested: While I was reading all of that, I thought of a question.
Air Dragon: shoot.
Anyone who is interested: Is it illogical to have a Pokemon have psychic powers when they're not psychic?
Anyone who is interested: I read a fic once where the author had an Arcanine that was psychic.
Air Dragon: ok...
Air Dragon: well, lucario's not psychic himself, but he can still learn it. there are ways of chalking abnormalitiesdown to legitimate, fictional reasons...
Air Dragon: psychic parent, dna experimentation, advanced esp bonding with the trainer, unexplained fluke (be careful with this one, try to put a humorous spin on the situation to avoid/deflect awkward questions)
Anyone who is interested: Is the Shinx evolutionary line really as overrated as you say they are?
Air Dragon: not at all. you just seem to show an exceptional fondness for them that gets you caught easily under a different user id.. lol
Air Dragon: you could try making shinx a second, or third captured pokemon that the trainer comes to rely on heavily. that would shake things up a bit... no?
Air Dragon: btw, it's been sent to your inbox
Air Dragon: titled lecture on plot
Air Dragon: or youcould trade off a pokemon the protagonist caught for a shinx based on a mutual understanding between the two trainers. eg: hero catches grimer she doesn't want/doesn't want her as a trainer. meets kid with a shinx and the same relationship problem. solution? trade off! (I might try this one, but feel free to go ahead and use it if you prefer)


SHINX IN KANTO?

Or How To Put a Pokemon in a region or area where he doesn't belong?

Anyone who is interested: Can you give me an example of how/what situation a Shinx should be caught in?
Air Dragon: hmm. well, shinx are found in the hily grasslands of route 202 and near the fuego ironworks. since their common and catlike, you could get one in a nearby area that wandered from its pride.
Air Dragon: maybe the trainer tried to catch something else and caught it instead (that got a couple of chuckles when I tried it)
Air Dragon: or maybe the trainer was searching for a shinx and eager to catch one, wound up catching other pokemon before noticing what they were.
Air Dragon: hero: now if I were a shinx, where would be?
Air Dragon: (something moves nearby)
Air Dragon: Hero: there's one now! go pokeball!
Air Dragon: capture successful!
Air Dragon: Pokedex: congratulations! you have caught your third bidoof!
Air Dragon: Hero: WTF?!?! (censored of course)
Air Dragon: get my drift? it diesn't have to be straightforward. think of themost coolest opportunities/scenarios, then picture them going wrong.
Air Dragon: this is one way to make ultimate humour.
Air Dragon: it doesn't only relate to captures. battles and shippy moments are included too...
Anyone who is interested: Maybe I shoulda said I specialize in Kanto-based fics.
Air Dragon: or think of the most ridiculous scenarios, and think of ways to bring out maturity in them. this works in actiony sense
Air Dragon: ok. so you like kanto fics. no problem. look at pikarat... I mean pikachu.
Air Dragon: it's EVERYWHERE... like some sort of freak population experiment gone wrong (a quip you may want to use...lol)
Anyone who is interested: What I'm trying to say is, and some people hate me for doing this, but I like Sinnoh pokes in Kanto.
Air Dragon: getting there... shinx could fall into a similar category. maybe a pride went migratory due to a lost battle for territory.
Air Dragon: they end up in kanto. one gets separated, maybe ostracised, blamed for the pride's suffering
Air Dragon: then that one shinx gets caught either by hero/by other trainer who trades with hero for something he sees and likes but hero dislikes/pokemon that hates hero
Anyone who is interested: If I went with one above, would I have to do a pov?
Air Dragon: only if you want/ if people insist on it...
Air Dragon: the second one usually happens when you're really vague on a pokemon's past, or you drop tantalizing hints about it but do not elaborate.
Air Dragon: but if people do ask, take your sweet time in telling them. wait for theperfect opportunity to tell them, or even better, show them, and then do it!
Air Dragon: but only if you want to. some people make pov's like this one-shots, like Griff did for Drezdk

OK! If anybody has any more questions, please hit my pm box and i'll try my best to reply here for the good of all!

L@er!

Skulker00
11th February 2009, 4:01 AM
I am bad at Description and I use Notepad so I'm wondering if I can get some help with my story. I wrote a prologue but the Prologue was a epic fail so I need help seeing if It would be good now that I have changed it so that it seems to have a bit more description so Could someone give me feedback if you want to help me get more description? I need help with that.

Zephyr Flare
11th February 2009, 2:51 PM
Please note this is Advice for Aspiring Authors, not a thread to ask for reviews. You can always ask for a beta using the threads in Author's Cafe.

Sandra

crimsonsapphire92
7th May 2009, 6:59 PM
Is it alright to have more than one main character? And how do I make it more clear that the story is being told from an omnipotent narrator? Every time I try to do so, people think that it's being told from third person limited...

Zephyr Flare
7th May 2009, 7:32 PM
No idea on the later as it's not something I've personally tried in a non piss take sense or have and not realised. And of course it's all right to have more than one main as sometimes it's just needed.

I'm trying so hard not to break into Yugioh Abridged comments I swear.

Sandra

Llama_Guy
9th May 2009, 1:04 AM
Uhm, if it says so and I missed it, sorry, but here's one: Read through others' works.

What do I need to do this?
Um, liking to read, time, willingness to learn and study a work of fiction.

The starting point
Well-established, longer fanfics usually amounts so some kind of goodness (check people's comments too; if they like it much, you've got yourself a starting point), so reading these is often the best for this method.

Read, read and read!
Yup, now you've gotta read it too. Read the chapters at least once, but remember twice is twice as good as once, and three times the charm!

Soo... now what?
When you read the fic, set yourself in for a study session. See how the writer makes their fic interesting to read. Descriptions. Pacing. Sentence structure. Easy-to-read language. Chemistry between characters. Clever dialog. The small gestures and ways of talking when they interact. The latter one is particularly useful to know some about when writing dialog-heavy partitions of your chapters.

And words!
If they use a lot of cool, small words that makes it easy to put something into one word rather than a whole part-sentence, remembering such words and learning to put them to good use is key. See for example; "he lay in his bed, his legs and arms spread out wide" versus "he lay sprawled in bed". There are tons of other such interesting words which can make the fic easier to read, and often more precise in its descriptions. Beat up a dictionary, find out what they mean if you're even the slightest bit of unsure - using them naturally requires you to know the exact meaning of the word. It even makes it easier to use in more vague meanings of the word. Then write down several example sentences with the word. Heck, make a glossary if needed. I've done that, and believe me, there's a lot of useful words I never knew and wouldn't have known if not for that (simply reading and trying to remember the word is not the way to go). There's even a lot of useless words I know...

So I've studied and learned. What now?
Well, now you gotta try and use this. Write up an introducing paragraph or two to a story you're interested in writing, preferably with some dialog. Actually, do this before studying. After having read and studied, do the same stuff again; try to vaguely rewrite the events of the paragraph(s) you wrote, same with dialog. Only put your newfound knowledge to use. See how it's changed. Hopefully, it'll look more interesting now. More vivid descriptions, better dialog, interactions between characters, better flow and so on.

There's always a falling point. What's it here?
True enough, there is a big one. And that is to not copy a writer's style. Learn from the ones who are better than you, don't steal. This may be hard, but absolutely necessary if you want to succeed in doing this.

Last words?
This method is more useful for the smaller picture; that is, details that go within single chapters, or even paragraphs. Dialog, flow, word usage and so on is what this method can teach you. If you're willing to learn, that is.

Llama_Guy
13th May 2009, 11:23 PM
Thesaurus usage

Thesauruses are pretty useful too. However, use them properly. That is, if you beat up a word and find quite a lot of them, don't just use the most fancy word you can find, nor use a random one. Think it trough when you take words from a thesaurus, or you might've been better off without one.

Combining a thesaurus with an English-to-English dictionary is often good. If you find a word, hit it up and see if it conveys the meaning you want it to convey. I use thesaurus[dot]reference[dot]com and the dictionary program Clue for this, and it works to full effect.

Now, an example or two of proper use. I hit up "angry", because I want to spice up my language more than "his behavior made her angry" (looking for an alternate word for angry here). Soo, I get up a ton of results. What do I do? Use a random one and hope to hit gold? Not at all! Check through the words (remember, this is also an opportunity to expand your vocabulary. Use it wisely!) in a dictionary, and find the one that fits your style best. Now, I want completely normal anger. Here's some words I find (I hit angry in the thesaurus):

irascible
Piqued
incensed
cross

Now, this sounds fancy. Let's see what our dictionary says about them. Irascible: Easily angered. "his behavior made her irascible" = "his behavior made her easily angered". That doesn't sound right. On to the next one!

Piqued: Angry/resentful because your pride has been hurt. Might be usable depending on context, but no one said anything about someone's pride being hurt here. Not good enough. Next one!

Incensed: Angered. Simple and clean, but... the word is a bit too, uh, fancy. Remember, fancy words such as these are okay enough, but keep them away if possible, as not everyone can understand such words easily. And if you need to thesaurus the word angry, then you might better keep it simple for your own sake, too.

Cross: Angry. Simple and clean; this is also a not-so-fancy word as f.ex. incensed (I didn't know that until I hit it up, at least =/). I think the general tone of the word also conveys the meaning in a way. In other words, this might be okay to use! "his behavior made her cross". Simple and easy, really.

Bow, this sounds like it takes up a lot of time, and, well, it can do so, but it's useful to find words to convey your exact meanings too (i.e. in one sentence "piqued" might have been preferred over simply "angry" or "cross" [f.ex. "his mocking remark piqued her"]), and it can make the readers' impression of your work a new one as well. A good language is key. It can also be a very fun way to learn new words and expand upon your dictionary.

That concludes my small, and hopefully useful, guide on how to use thesauruses wisely.

Semreth
3rd June 2009, 3:06 AM
Air Dragon briefly covered this in his post above, but I was wondering what the general reaction/feeling is on Pokémon that were introduced in Johto, Hoenn and Sinnoh being found outside of those regions?

The region based Pokédexs is one of my biggest pet hates of the games, which my story will be based on, and it is something I would like to do away with. Essentially, the trainer would start out with a ‘National Pokédex’.

Of course, by this, I do not mean that said trainer is going to leave Pallet town and immediately start bumping into Chimchars, Treeckos and Totodiles galore.

Wild Pokémon will still be fairly region/climate/terrain based – the few exceptions being things like normal, flying and bug types.

Some examples - Wurmples existing alongside the other two worm type Pokémon in Viridian Forest. Hoothoots being found in wooded areas, like Viridian forest. Other Johto Pokémon being seen in Kanto, mainly on the bordering areas, as they share the same land mass.

The major ramification would be in terms of experienced trainers, Gym leaders and elite four members in Kanto using Pokémon that they have come across in their travellers. I’m assuming that this kind of thing has been done before, but I did want to check how it would be received before I went ahead with my story. Any feedback on this would be apreciated.

Just realised that I used an overly long explanation to ask a fairly simple question, so thanks for taking the time to read that. *rolls eyes*

MechaMage
20th June 2009, 9:03 PM
I think that you should do whatever you like in a fan fic if you give reason. For example, say you wan't your main character to catch a legendary. Well then make him somehow aquire a master ball. The master ball can catch anything instantly, but remember that since masters are normaly one of a kind in the games, it should at least be uber rare, if not one of a kind.

Hope this helps you embrace your creativity without ruining the fan fic.

lugia*master
2nd July 2009, 10:11 PM
Any pokemon can, with reason, be found any-where. If you, in some way, are pressured or feel the need to explain why there are some pokemon which are uncommon to the area, perhaps you could explain that they have migrated for a certain season or a certain part of a cycle in their lives.

It may be a bit harder to get away with changing Gym Leaders / Elite Four' pokemon, but, perhaps your story could be set a few years in the future, between wi=hich they have gone out and revamped their team.

Besides which, a FanFiction is whatever you make it, within reason of course, nothing too brash and totally unrelated. ^_^

alphabeta
2nd July 2009, 10:18 PM
I've got a question. How should I describe a main character for the first time? Appearance and personality wise? Everytime I try, it ends up being a list of traits. An example:

Mike has brown eyes and hair that he likes to keep around his ears.

How can I give a clear picture of a character without simply reciting?

Mrs. Lovett
2nd July 2009, 11:05 PM
Use actions to describe his appearance.

As he ran, he frequently pushed back (hair color) strands of hair behind his ears.

He stared at the tree with his chocolate brown eyes.

Something along those lines. This way, your description will tie in with what's currently going on in the story. You should only describe what's necessary to the character at the moment, and the rest will be revealed later on. (If his age isn't critical at the time of his introduction, let it be revealed when he looks at his driver's license, etc. etc.)

alphabeta
2nd July 2009, 11:15 PM
Good point. Here's another one: What information is considered relevant at the beginning of a story? Hair color, eye color, and size should be enough (as well as a bit of personality), right?

Mrs. Lovett
2nd July 2009, 11:26 PM
You should definitely mention hair color first. It distinguishes your character from another. (What's the first thing you look at when you meet a new person? Hair, eyes, height?)
Eye color would be good too, but it's really up to you. You should also point out any major personality traits that you might refer to throughout the story. So, basically anything that is vital to the scene, and to continuing the story.

alphabeta
2nd July 2009, 11:32 PM
Thanks. My first chapter already looks better.

oRaNgE~1337
3rd July 2009, 5:21 AM
Don't describe unless you think the reader needs to know. I honestly don't care about a character's eye color.

dogsgofetch
13th July 2009, 2:02 AM
What, on principal makes stats and levels a bad thing? School of Hard Knocks, anyone? Or if that doesn't work, has anybody ever read Dragonfree's The Quest for the Legends?

Zephyr Flare
13th July 2009, 1:44 PM
What, on principal makes stats and levels a bad thing? School of Hard Knocks, anyone? Or if that doesn't work, has anybody ever read Dragonfree's The Quest for the Legends?

Do note the original Advice thread is from 01/02 (Perhaps ealier). It is also on that particular note you've mentioned more of a ward for newbies who get in way over their head or use as a crutch sccne being lazier is eaiser. Done properly however it's fine but many newbies use every shrotcut they can...

Sandra

Llama_Guy
13th July 2009, 8:58 PM
I have a question pertaining to punctuation in quotes. When you write a quote, and the person ends what they are saying, should there always, no exception, be a period there?

This sentence, "“Not for everyone I’d guess, but I feel too awkward with everyone staring at me when I walk past them.” she said, and shuddered a bit at the thought.", made me doubt. Both my knowledge and logic tells me there should be a period here, but Word disagrees, proposing a comma. Now, Word's spell/grammar check isn't always the most trustworthy, but it disagreeing with me made be curious as to what is correct and not.

For reference, it states the following rule in this case: "Use a comma as well as quotation marks to separate the quote from the rest of your sentence."

Breezy
13th July 2009, 9:39 PM
Edit: Argh fark. Misread. Your question was simpler than I thought. Hang on. >_>

Speech tags are the things that follow after your dialogue usually, such as "he said," "she replied," "I asked," "they muttered together" and so on. These are not sufficient enough to stand alone as its own sentence, thus you DO need the comma in order for your sentence to be grammatically correct.

K, logically, let's think about your quotation.


"Not for everyone I’d guess, but I feel too awkward with everyone staring at me when I walk past them.” she said, and shuddered a bit at the thought.Ignoring what's in the quotation marks, can "she said, and shuddered a bit at the thought" stand alone as its own sentence? No. Hence the comma.

The only time you can use a period after dialogue is when the speech tag can stand alone. These usually exclude the actual speech tag (again, things like "he said").

Ex) "Breezy totally failed at answering the question." The girl shook her head as she read Breezy's response. "My god. She is such epic fail."

If you wanted to use a period in your own example, you would have to reword/omit certain segments of your "speech tag" so that it can stand alone as its own sentence.

"Not for everyone I’d guess, but I feel too awkward with everyone staring at me when I walk past them.” She shuddered a bit at the thought.

And yeah. Just ask if you need more examples or whatever.








And I'ma keep this crap here just in case anyone wants to know useless information.


This sentence, "“Not for everyone I’d guess, but I feel too awkward with everyone staring at me when I walk past them.” she said, and shuddered a bit at the thought.", made me doubt. Both my knowledge and logic tells me there should be a period here, but Word disagrees, proposing a comma. Now, Word's spell/grammar check isn't always the most trustworthy, but it disagreeing with me made be curious as to what is correct and not.Your example is kind of odd in itself, because usually one would rework it so that you wouldn't need the single set of quotation marks and it would all fit in one big double quotation mark umbrella. But eh.

When you have quotations within quotations, you use single mark quotation marks (the apostrophe key) to set the smaller quote apart from the larger quote. In events that you have quotation marks within quotation marks within quotation marks, you would refer back to double mark quotation marks (so double, single, double). Other than that, I'm pretty sure normal dialogue rules apply.

Quotations within quotations examples:

He offered her words of encouragement: "'You can do it!' he shouted. 'I believe in you!'"
"Did you ever have to read 'Random Poem Title That Breezy Made Up?'" asked the girl.
"No," she replied, "but I bet Breezy will ask, 'Did you guys read "Random Poem Title that Breezy made up" today?' I hate her. She probably smells like feet."
"And Breezy said, 'Let there be cats!'"

So I'm assuming that regular dialogue rules still apply for single quotation marks.

"'Not for everyone I’d guess, but I feel too awkward with everyone staring at me when I walk past them,' she said, and shuddered a bit at the thought."

No idea if that helped. Lol.

Hey, did you guys read "Random Poem Title that Breezy Made Up" today?

Llama_Guy
14th July 2009, 5:05 PM
Yeah, okay. Now that I think about it, I think I read something like that not so long ago >_<

Thanks a heaps, Breezy ^^

Lugion
17th July 2009, 8:27 AM
I don't know if this has already been said, but when I wake up in the morning, I'll have forgotten entirely, and right now, it is 1:20 AM, and I'm a bit too tired to read (insert number of pages here) pages.

So, a little thing called "homage" can do quite a bit of good these days. For example, maybe Red's Pika refuses to evolve into a Raichu. Maybe a Tyranitar rampages through Celadon City. Maybe an Aerodactyl or two are caught in an eruption of Mt. Chimney. All of these are little homages to things long (not so much in the case of Pika) past, and people love to be reminded of their old favorite things.

It never fails to bring a smile to my face when a reader of mine (I have several kaiju-genre stories that I have yet to post here) says, "Oh, that reminds me of such-and-such movie."

And another thing: learn proper tenses and forms. Pokemons is not a word. Pokemon is used to refer to a singular monster, or multiple.

lugia*master
23rd July 2009, 10:09 PM
Yes, as are all pokemon names. Like Sheep: A Sheep, a herd of Sheep, as opposed to a goose, and a gaggle of geese. It's always:

1 Mareep, 5 Mareep.
1 Dialga, 5 Dialga.

always.

Just thought I'd have my put in.

shac
18th August 2009, 7:11 PM
-^- Good point up there!

Anyway, I want to know if it's a risky business to work on a trainer fic with fakemon and a made-up region; because I have been writing one for a while now, and none seems to care to read. None is saying that it's bad either, and that's why I am just going on with my writing.
Could someone please give some tips on how to make people read your fic?

Thanks!

Yami Ryu
18th August 2009, 7:26 PM
-^- Good point up there!

Anyway, I want to know if it's a risky business to work on a trainer fic with fakemon and a made-up region; because I have been writing one for a while now, and none seems to care to read. None is saying that it's bad either, and that's why I am just going on with my writing.
Could someone please give some tips on how to make people read your fic?

Thanks!

A: Either scrap your work entirely and write something you don't enjoy but will bring in the masses
B: Review others and hope for the best
C: Put senseless violence, retarded stalker-signifigant others, and zombies into your story.

Or realize as you said you're working on a trainer story with a made up region and fakemon, not many people are interested in pokemon they can't visualize right off the bat or need to be constantly explained in minute detail, much more than average already existing pokemon.

Just continue writing as there's really nothing that AFAA can do to help you get reviewers and this really isn't the place to ask :/

loonatic
18th August 2009, 7:46 PM
I know there are several fan fics here set in the Pokemon universe, but I am interested to know if many people like reading non-Pokemon fics.

SBaby
28th August 2009, 5:06 AM
Just continue writing as there's really nothing that AFAA can do to help you get reviewers and this really isn't the place to ask :/

You know, it's ironic that you constantly refer people to this section, yet you're sitting here telling members that this section won't help them:/



-^- Good point up there!

Anyway, I want to know if it's a risky business to work on a trainer fic with fakemon and a made-up region; because I have been writing one for a while now, and none seems to care to read. None is saying that it's bad either, and that's why I am just going on with my writing.
Could someone please give some tips on how to make people read your fic?

Thanks!

Personally, if you're going with OT Fics in a new Region, I'd say to try and set it apart from other OT Fics in some way. There are many ways to do this. Put in a menacing villain at some point. Someone that's a real threat, maybe someone that's truly evil. If you're a ways into the fic, no problem. Have them show up later in the story. And make it a Pokemon. Too many human villains around.

Maybe change the story's focus to something on a larger scale. Or you could always explore an avenue of Pokemon that's rarely touched upon. Is everyone really alright with Pokemon Battles? Maybe there are those that are against them. Just a few ideas.

Deadly.Braviary
18th September 2009, 7:55 AM
One thing I'd like to add. Throw in a bit of humour, but make it sound serious. That will add to the fun value. Like,

'Mike sat up bolt upright. He wasn’t wearing his pants."

will sound funnier than

"Mike sat up bolt upright. He wasn’t wearing his pants!"

whereas the second will give more shock value. Just trying to help.

Soberheartless
5th January 2010, 4:29 AM
I really need help. I'm Soberheartless, the author of Pokemon Fire Red and Leaf Green. See, my reviewers have been reading my chapters, and it seems like it is impossible for me to get better. I thought, maybe I can get advice from here. So, has anyone read my story to understand what it is about, and if you have, do you have any suggestions, or examples maybe?

misunderstoodhero
24th January 2010, 10:16 PM
I don't know where to post this, or even if this should be posted anywhere, But I've just figured out all the Pokemon my character is going to own during the course of the fic, and I'd just like to know what you guys think?

Maybe they're too powerful or there's a similar Pokemon that would be better? May I have your thoughts please?

Okay, here goes:

Bulbasaur/Ivysaur/Venusaur ( Starter)
Pidgey/Pidgeotto/Pidgeot
Mankey/Primeape ( Primeape is given away )
Elekid ( traded to rival )
Lapras ( reiceived from trade with rival )
Gastly/Haunter ( not given away or anything, just never evolves into Gengar)
Vulpix ( given away )
Ponyta/Rapidash
Eevee/Espeon ( given away at the very end of the story )
Dratini/Dragonair ( not given away or anything, just never gets to evolve into dragonite )

Thanks!

JX Valentine
25th January 2010, 12:42 AM
Bulbasaur/Ivysaur/Venusaur ( Starter)
Pidgey/Pidgeotto/Pidgeot
Mankey/Primeape ( Primeape is given away )
Elekid ( traded to rival )
Lapras ( reiceived from trade with rival )
Gastly/Haunter ( not given away or anything, just never evolves into Gengar)
Vulpix ( given away )
Ponyta/Rapidash
Eevee/Espeon ( given away at the very end of the story )
Dratini/Dragonair ( not given away or anything, just never gets to evolve into dragonite )

Well, there's no legendaries, so that's a good sign.

Otherwise, it's hard to tell you what I personally think of it because, well, I don't know much about the context. As in, I don't know who your character is, what their personality is like (which would affect what Pokémon they want to raise -- sort of like how Paul only keeps Pokémon he thinks are strong and how Misty would never take in a Bug-type because she's terrified of them), what region they're from (which would limit what kinds of Pokémon they'd be seeing in the wild), and so on and so forth. On top of that, I don't know what happens in the story that allows him/her to acquire these Pokémon. Heck, I don't even know if you're saying (s)he owns all of these at once and completely violates the six-Pokémon limit.

So, I guess I'm saying that it's an okay line-up, but because I have no idea what's going on with absolutely everything (which would require me to actually read your story to get all the answers I'd probably need to answer your initial question), I really can't offer much of an opinion. All I can say is go with whatever fits your story and character, and if those are the Pokémon that fit (and if you can convince the reader that they fit through your plot -- instead of, for example, just giving a character a Pokémon because you like it), then we'll think they're good choices.

Good luck.

Edit: Also, I realize this is a cop-out answer and that some people scream if they see things like Dratini or Eevee in a team, but... *shrug* To be honest, if you've got an explanation for it instead of throwing it in because it's cool, then considering it's not a starter, I'd be hard-pressed to find a problem with it. Of course, this also means you'd need to figure out how to get your character things like Eevee (which aren't normally wild in game canon) and Dratini (which are mythical to the point where one game said they were only rumored to exist until tiny colonies of them were found at the bottom of certain lakes).

misunderstoodhero
30th January 2010, 9:18 PM
Well, there's no legendaries, so that's a good sign.

Otherwise, it's hard to tell you what I personally think of it because, well, I don't know much about the context. As in, I don't know who your character is, what their personality is like (which would affect what Pokémon they want to raise -- sort of like how Paul only keeps Pokémon he thinks are strong and how Misty would never take in a Bug-type because she's terrified of them), what region they're from (which would limit what kinds of Pokémon they'd be seeing in the wild), and so on and so forth. On top of that, I don't know what happens in the story that allows him/her to acquire these Pokémon. Heck, I don't even know if you're saying (s)he owns all of these at once and completely violates the six-Pokémon limit.

So, I guess I'm saying that it's an okay line-up, but because I have no idea what's going on with absolutely everything (which would require me to actually read your story to get all the answers I'd probably need to answer your initial question), I really can't offer much of an opinion. All I can say is go with whatever fits your story and character, and if those are the Pokémon that fit (and if you can convince the reader that they fit through your plot -- instead of, for example, just giving a character a Pokémon because you like it), then we'll think they're good choices.

Good luck.

Edit: Also, I realize this is a cop-out answer and that some people scream if they see things like Dratini or Eevee in a team, but... *shrug* To be honest, if you've got an explanation for it instead of throwing it in because it's cool, then considering it's not a starter, I'd be hard-pressed to find a problem with it. Of course, this also means you'd need to figure out how to get your character things like Eevee (which aren't normally wild in game canon) and Dratini (which are mythical to the point where one game said they were only rumored to exist until tiny colonies of them were found at the bottom of certain lakes).

He owns more then 6 Pokemon at once, but never has more then 6 on his team. He oaks the rest and rotates his team.

He finds the Eevee by team rocket outside the game counter.

He catches the Dratini in the safari zone, out of pure luck, to be honest!

IJuggler
30th January 2010, 9:59 PM
...Team Rocket? You mean the evil thugs who are known to steal Pokemon? I'd sure like to know how anything short of a League Champion could get anything from them. Not even joking. Sure, they may be pathetic in the anime, but if the group was able to function like they spposedly do, they'd need to be pretty scary.

Negrek
31st January 2010, 1:18 AM
...Team Rocket? You mean the evil thugs who are known to steal Pokemon? I'd sure like to know how anything short of a League Champion could get anything from them. Not even joking. Sure, they may be pathetic in the anime, but if the group was able to function like they spposedly do, they'd need to be pretty scary.
The champion? Really? It's true that Team Rocket is stupidly ineffectual in the anime, but it's not like the realistic view is to make it full of terrifying characters at all levels. There will always be new recruits, perhaps some incompetent middlemen; I don't imagine they'd last long, but like any organization, Team Rocket is bound to have its dim bulbs as well as its shining stars. A competent trainer could probably handle one or two grunts, if they didn't have non-pokémon weaponry or were unusually talented and just hadn't been promoted yet. Trying to infiltrate a Rocket base, yes, you would want serious firepower, but taking out one bored and unobservant guard on the street, not so much. Being able to steal pokémon doesn't imply skillz above that of "petty thief."

Nonetheless, misunderstoodhero's explanation of the eevee thing is quite unclear. Does he actually steal the eevee (presumably stolen) back from the grunt--in which case why would the guy even have it, it's not like grunts get to keep anything good--or just find it "by" where a TR grunt happens to be stationed? Either way, suspect.

Edit: Okay, I read misunderstoodhero's post as meaning one, maybe two TR grunt ("outside" the game corner) guards; actually attempting to infiltrate their Goldenrod base would require a certain level of trainer badassitude or lots of luck, etc.

misunderstoodhero
2nd February 2010, 7:51 PM
Sorry, my last post had a bit of a typo in it! I've edited it!

It was meant to say:

" He finds the Eevee ABANDONED by team rocket outside the game corner.

My character does fight team Rocket a lot actually, starting off fighting low level grunts and taking on tougher opponents until ( Like Negrek mentioned ) the climax of the story in which he actually leads a raid on the team rocket headquarters! Exciting?

Like negrek mentioned, he would need a lot of firepower to do this. However, he is joined in this raid by six of his friends, It's not like he's a one-man army. Of course, a total of seven people against a full base of rocket members seems unlikely, but the story would be a little dull if the odds weren't stacked against them. and who says they're successful in this raid?

Does this sound like a good story? Is there any problems with it? Be honest!

Negrek
3rd February 2010, 3:13 AM
Someone in Team Rocket abandoned an incredibly rare pok&#233;mon they could instead have sold for big money?

That would be a large logic problem, yes.

IJuggler
4th February 2010, 11:47 PM
I guess your story would work, if it could jump the hurdle of unrealistic expectations with good writing/characterisation. But yes, unless the Eevee had something wrong with it (maybe a broken leg, or some other weakness), I couldn't imagine Team Rocket leaving behind such a rare and mysterious Pokemon.

Also, just some pre-emptive advice; don't jump into the Team Rocket plot fast. Phase it in or something, because when a trainer goes after Team Rocket on their own for no apparent reason (outside of "they're bad!"), it seems like a strawman story, with a predictable ending.

If you do write it with the seven people taking on Team Rocket, remember about Conservation Of Ninjutsu when you write it. Huge groups of grunts feels like shredding paper, but if you're face one-on-one, it's going to be nearly impossible to win.

maxelle
7th February 2010, 6:29 AM
Even though I'm new to the forums I'm not new to writing (Mostly non-finished or scrapped works). My advice is make your characters unique. Someone mentioned names before and said try and be different every once and a while and that is exactly right. I think the more unique the name the more thought was put into it. Its okay to have a Delilah and Sirius instead of Joe and Sally. Try and be as different as possible. And by the way, I know I haven't posted anything yet but by the end of the week I plan to have my prologue to my first fic ready.

Luckster
2nd March 2010, 7:59 AM
Just got one question:

How bad would reviewers beat me up if I have just ONE character using the suffix "-chan"? I know I'm not Japanese, but I just feel that it may be in the specific character's...er...character, to use that suffix. It's a Canon Character, not an Original Character, if that counts for anything. I also don't use any other suffixes anywhere else though.

I'm tempted to give the suffix a test-run, and will remove it if I get beaten up by various reviewers, but I would still like to know ahead of time how unforgiving people may be.

JX Valentine
2nd March 2010, 8:13 AM
If it fits the character's habits and personality to do it, then I'd say there's really no problem with it. It's abusing it just for the sake of being a weeaboo (instead of because it's just what the character would actually do) that really rubs people the wrong way.

Luckster
2nd March 2010, 8:20 AM
Maybe I should get second opinions on the character FIRST before doing it then, eh?

The character who would use the Suffix would be Miror B., calling my character Yuki (Already been yelled at for her name) "Snowflake-chan" because it irritates her and he doesn't respect her.

IJuggler
4th March 2010, 6:49 PM
I'm not sure that he would be a character to use such a suffix. However, if the character that you wrote him into would speak like that, then I guess it could work. Otherwise, it'll look out of place.

Luckster
4th March 2010, 10:20 PM
I'll have to work on it carefully then. I still have time LONG before he enters my work so I have plenty of time to write, re-write, chop up, and write again before it looks decent.

bobandbill
5th March 2010, 2:38 PM
Hmm...Miror B. to me at least from the games doesn't seem too much of the kind to say chan - he more calls people darlings. =p But on the flip side if you explain why he chooses that name/why he knows it annoys her, then it's certainly plausible - but for people he doesn't like he seems more likely to insult their lack of dancing prowess or being so-not-cool or the like going by dialogue in the games rather than choose that specific name on his own accord. XD If that helps?

Luckster
9th March 2010, 11:04 AM
Yeah, I'm replaying the games to study his nature a little bit more. I may have missed it, but I don't recall him using the term 'Darling' in Gale of Darkness...hmm...perhaps he grew out of it? Perhaps I should purposely run into him a little more.

Clare
8th April 2010, 4:32 PM
Someone mentioned names before and said try and be different every once and a while and that is exactly right. I think the more unique the name the more thought was put into it. Its okay to have a Delilah and Sirius instead of Joe and Sally.

On the other hand, you need to be careful when it comes to naming characters because, if a character has a name which is TOO unique, this could be seen as a sign of a Mary Sue. Unless all the other characters have "unique" names as well . . . Ordinary, everyday names, on the other hand, blend in seamlessly and don't draw too much attention to the character.

Mew-100
17th April 2010, 5:09 PM
I will use this guide in my upcoming fanfic!
One thing you could add, for the proof reading, is that people may want to write their fanfic in Microsoft Word. By doing this they can instantly know whether they've made a spelling or grammar mistake and not have to go through it all at the end. This is also a good way to get your story back up quickly to add to it and then afterward, copying and pasting it to the thread.

Thanks for the guide, I'll try my best!

Chibi_Muffin
29th April 2010, 6:10 PM
I was just wondering something. I have a story (which may or may not be posted here) and the main character is a 6-8 year old girl who battles with Pokémon. I didn't say 'trains' because she doesn't enter a league or battle a gym (she's too young) but rather battles with school friends. She also never really ventures far from her town, and only goes outside it with her mother around. Is this acceptable?

I also want to know any interesting suggestions for a Pokémon that might work well for a naive, kind young girl - as in something different, something funny! Here's what I've got:

Male Jolly Togepi/Togetic
Female Calm Hoppip/Skiploom
Male Rash Plusle
Male Docile Marill
Female Quiet Vulpix
Male Lax Chingling
Female Naive Corsola
Female Timid Happiny/Chansey
Male Lonely Caterpie/Metapod/Butterfree

bigtukker
6th May 2010, 2:33 PM
I write a fanfic in Dutch (not on this forum by the way), but I almost always use Behind the Name for naming characters. For example: I created a brother to Erika (Gym Leader Celadon City) and named him Anton (flower). It's pretty cool to have a second layer in your story.

IJuggler
10th May 2010, 11:08 PM
Chibi Muffin, I think anything on that last would work. Just remember, when you are going to write a story with pokemon as main characters, you'll have to work out a whole system for the ones that don't have limbs/workable hands and stuff.

While I don't pretend to know how people like their stories, I know that I wouldn't find anything wrong with a 6-8 year-old girl fighting with pokemon. My only problem with what you've said would be that there seems to be no main conflict to keep the story moving. But then, I don't expect you to divulge your whole plotline here ;P

Tinokika396
18th May 2010, 3:45 PM
Can I make story that too change anime ?? Just like Ash lose in Johto, but in fan fic he do not!!!! But this is only example.

Clare
19th May 2010, 4:12 PM
So long as it's related to "Pokemon" in some way, you can write pretty much anything - within reason. Also, fanfic writers for lots of fandoms have written fics which deliberately deviate from canon, usually to explore what might have happened had a certain aspect of canon played out differently.

Although, since your English is - how shall I put this? - less than perfect, you might want to think about getting a beta reader.

Chibi_Muffin
20th May 2010, 7:44 PM
Chibi Muffin, I think anything on that last would work. Just remember, when you are going to write a story with pokemon as main characters, you'll have to work out a whole system for the ones that don't have limbs/workable hands and stuff.

While I don't pretend to know how people like their stories, I know that I wouldn't find anything wrong with a 6-8 year-old girl fighting with pokemon. My only problem with what you've said would be that there seems to be no main conflict to keep the story moving. But then, I don't expect you to divulge your whole plotline here ;P

Yes, there is a plot. It's the girl I was curious about, seeing if it was generally acceptable.

By the way, the list of Pokémon was meant to be her's, the ones she owns. I was wondering if there are any suggestions for a good couple more Pokémon to give her. Something different from the norm, but also something that could work. No legendaries, but a shiny would be okay if you give justification!

IJuggler
21st May 2010, 12:25 AM
When I want to give a trainer Pokemon, I pull out my old Pearn version and go through the Pokedex, and pick ones that I find cool/good looking/fun to write about.

For example, with my latest oneshot that I'm working on, I've decided to give one character an Abra and a Doduo. The opposing trainer has a Shieldon and a Spinda.

If you're looking for Pokemon to use, I'd like to give a shout-out to Pokemon like Nosepass and Illumise, while a thumbs down to Xatu/Natu. With the first two Pokemon, you have a wide range of things you can do, the least of which is showing how they fight. The last two, however, leave a bad taste in my mouth, because I always see people writing faux-deep oneshots about them :x

If you're looking for Pokemon that would fit in with the first group you had, I'd suggest Seel, Clamperl, Surskit and Drowsee. A little out there, but still matching the general theme.

Lilly2
24th September 2010, 12:09 PM
To whomever wrote the major article, I just want to let you know you've served as a major inspiration to a girl who's loved Pokemon since the time before a Game Boy Advance. Writing about Pokemon feels amazing because almost anything can happen. This article has re-inspired me to continue editing and adding on to my work. I'm not even sure if this thread is leagal because I can't understand the rules to well, but I had to post this when I read it :D And I do apologize if this is illegal...

Jirachi Wish Master
27th September 2010, 12:29 AM
Thanks alot for this, its helping me write my fanfic alot.

disclaimer065
3rd October 2010, 3:17 AM
One thing I'd like to say is that some elements often associated with Mary Sues aren't necessarily bad. For instance, is a villain really going to go by his given name of Josh, or by some super-badass title he came up with for himself?

Also, using some Pokemon that may cause people to lean towards viewing a character as a Mar(t)y S(t)u[e] is perfectly okay, as long as you don't have a team full of Pseudo-legendaries or something like that. Having one or two OU Pokemon in a team otherwise full of UU or NU Pokemon shouldn't be cause for alarm.

For example, having an Eevee(lution) can say a lot about a character, depending on how they chose to evolve it. Is an evil douchebag going to have an Umbreon or Espeon? Not likely, unless the Umbreon or Espeon is just as evil as their trainer. Or how forcing an Eevee to evolve via a stone against its wishes can emphasize that some people are more concerned about their overall team than their individual Pokemon. Of course, that applies to any Pokemon that can evolve by stone.

JX Valentine
6th October 2010, 11:31 PM
For instance, is a villain really going to go by his given name of Josh, or by some super-badass title he came up with for himself?

I'd hate to say it, but yes, they could if you wanted to write them that way. Buffy the Vampire Slayer had loads of them, including villains with names like Warren and Andrew. The World Ends With You even has... ...Joshua, who attempted to destroy Shibuya because he thought not a single person in it was worth saving. Not to mention in Pokémon canon, your mileage may vary with names like Cyrus and Archie.

Point is, yeah, it depends on what your antagonist is like because not all of them are the stereotypical evil and creative supergenius. And sometimes, those that are (like the TWEWY example) don't necessarily want to come off as clearly evil.


Is an evil douchebag going to have an Umbreon or Espeon?

Well, canonically, they could. (http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Annie_(movie)#Pok.C3.A9mon) In fanfiction, this could also indicate a person who's an evil douchebag to everyone but his or her Pokémon or just an evil jerk who's classified as such because her values are messed up.

Now, I'm not saying that you're wrong about the point that some characteristics seen as Sueish don't necessarily make a Sue (a point I'll get into in a moment), but I'm just saying that not all characters follow certain stereotypes, like the idea that every good villain uses a badass title or that every Espeon is owned by a good guy unless it's evil. It's all about how you write a character, really.


Beyond that, there's another point I'd like to make here, and that's the fact that most people who think of the terms "Mary Sue" and "Gary Stu" (or Marty Stu, if you'd like to label it that way) think that they're determined by a set list of characteristics and that any single one in isolation means you've got a character raising red flags all over the place. However, that's not what having a Mary Sue means, and that's not what litmus tests are actually for. In this sense, I guess you could say I agree with you because those traits by themselves don't necessarily mean your character is a Sue or Stu.

To go into a bit more detail, litmus tests are designed to give you a list of traits that might make people uncomfortable. Newbie critics think that only a handful of these traits lead to a Mary Sue, but it's actually a large percentage of those traits in combination that give you that Sue label. Not only that, but it's not just any of those traits in combination but rather a specific number. You could, after all, have a purple-haired twin sister of Erika who happens to be a competent trainer and owner of an Eeveelution, and that doesn't necessarily make her a Sue if you handle writing her well. It's when you throw in the facts that she has incredible psychic powers, that everyone she meets (except the obvious villains) love her, that she's in an angsty love-hate relationship with her traveling partner (the favorite character of the writer, naturally), that she has a unique connection to a legendary Pokémon, and that she has a mystical destiny to save the world repeatedly that you start to have a Mary Sue.

Put very simply, all a Mary Sue is is a character who bends the rules of either canon or science to make everything in the story emphasize something about that character. For example, if canon characters act OOC because they're in contact (love, friendship, the same chapter as, whatever) with your original character, chances are, that OC is a Mary Sue. If your character has incredible powers that she uses to fight the forces of evil in a world that centers around Pokémon training, chances are, that's a Mary Sue. And so on and so forth.

So, yeah. Mary Sues = character who rapes canon to make her story look interesting. That's pretty much it. *shrug*

Lilly2
7th October 2010, 9:44 PM
Wow . . . you guys are all so smart . . .
So put into my own words, the entire story revloves around Mary Sue and always wins battles using her magical powers, and other such things?
I'm so glad I'm learning about all this!

disclaimer065
7th October 2010, 10:07 PM
Well... not necessarily. It's kinda like if everything goes their way, they never really have to try with anything, that kind of thing.

Lilly2
7th October 2010, 10:37 PM
Okay, good, I was worried there for a minute . . . So as long as the character has conflicts and problems and flaws, the character can still have powers?

JX Valentine
7th October 2010, 10:41 PM
Okay, good, I was worried there for a minute . . . So as long as the character has conflicts and problems and flaws, the character can still have powers?

Yeah. You just don't go overboard with them, and you take the time to emphasize the fact that the entire universe doesn't revolve around them because they have special powers or something like that. As in, if they solve their conflicts and whatnot through other means than their specialness, if that makes sense.

disclaimer065
7th October 2010, 11:08 PM
Like if they have serious girl problems and end up getting a girlfriend by just being themselves rather than by showing off their powers, or something similar.

Eloi
22nd October 2010, 10:24 AM
Like if they have serious girl problems and end up getting a girlfriend by just being themselves rather than by showing off their powers, or something similar.

So if my OC Crystal Hunter gets together with Ash after not getting together with anyone because she displays her adorableness and gets him because of that as opposed to using her psychic Aura that she received from Rota combined with the powers she got by being born in the Viridian Forest, it wouldn't be so sue-like?

TheAmazingAndrew
14th January 2011, 3:40 AM
Everyone remember. As good as this may make you feel:
Great job! Love it!

This is more helpful:
This is wrong and this is bad and those should do this.

Critisim with tips is more useful than a compliment... thats just acompliment.

Dragonite Ernston
14th January 2011, 3:53 AM
So if my OC Crystal Hunter gets together with Ash after not getting together with anyone because she displays her adorableness and gets him because of that as opposed to using her psychic Aura that she received from Rota combined with the powers she got by being born in the Viridian Forest, it wouldn't be so sue-like?

Well, pretty much, but it would be even better if it were her actual personality traits and hard work that got her there, instead of just her adorableness.

JX Valentine
14th January 2011, 4:49 AM
Everyone remember. As good as this may make you feel:
Great job! Love it!

This is more helpful:
This is wrong and this is bad and those should do this.

Critisim with tips is more useful than a compliment... thats just acompliment.

Not necessarily. There's also such a thing as a constructive compliment. It's basically what the name implies. Instead of just giving a one-liner compliment, you go into detail about what you liked by picking out specific points and, if you can, going into detail about it. For example, if you think the characterization in a fic is done well, you can always pick out a couple of specific examples, and/or you can say, "I thought this character was particularly believable. She's kind and brave, but she seems to obsess over the littlest things. I'm interested in seeing what she does when (insert plot point here) happens." And that's all you really have to say.

To be honest, you really don't want to go all negative as well because this could potentially discourage an author. Not to mention it paints you as the kind of reviewer who only knows how to point out errors instead of judge the entire work as a whole. A good review is one where you're able to do a mix of both if applicable -- point out the good and the bad in detail. That way, the writer can see you're not only reading, but you've got thoughtful things to say about all aspects of their work, not just their weakest points. They also know what they should keep doing (i.e., point out the good leads to them realizing they should keep it up) in addition to what they should work on the most. In other words, if you're well-rounded in a review, it'll be more effective than a review that only points out the positive or negative parts of a fic.

Or, in other words, you can give out either criticism or compliments so long as you be specific and say something of substance.

TheAmazingAndrew
14th January 2011, 4:56 AM
Not necessarily. There's also such a thing as a constructive compliment. It's basically what the name implies. Instead of just giving a one-liner compliment, you go into detail about what you liked by picking out specific points and, if you can, going into detail about it. For example, if you think the characterization in a fic is done well, you can always pick out a couple of specific examples, and/or you can say, "I thought this character was particularly believable. She's kind and brave, but she seems to obsess over the littlest things. I'm interested in seeing what she does when (insert plot point here) happens." And that's all you really have to say.

To be honest, you really don't want to go all negative as well because this could potentially discourage an author. Not to mention it paints you as the kind of reviewer who only knows how to point out errors instead of judge the entire work as a whole. A good review is one where you're able to do a mix of
both if applicable -- point out the good and the bad in detail. That way, the writer can see you're not only reading, but you've got thoughtful things to
say about all aspects of their work, not just their weakest points. They also know what they should keep doing (i.e., point out the good leads to them realizing they should keep it up) in addition to what they should work on the most. In other words, if you're well-rounded in a review, it'll be more effective
than a review that only points out the positive or negative parts of a fic.

Or, in other words, you can give out either criticism or compliments so long as you be specific and say something of
substance.




I just meant that its better to have critisim with tips than to have compliments with none, not that compliments can't be helpful.

JX Valentine
14th January 2011, 6:53 AM
I just meant that its better to have critisim with tips than to have compliments with none, not that compliments can't be helpful.

Well, yes, but my point is you'll probably want to avoid simplifying the advice to "compliments < concrit." This is because you're not really covering the fact that it is possible to give a good compliment, so the people you're targeting right now will assume that a good review can only be full of constructive criticism instead of both positive and negative points. (Trust me on this one. It's happened, much to the chagrin of both my face and my palm.)

Breezy
5th February 2011, 7:26 AM
Some tippy tips:

- If you have already fully written your story (or have a good number of chapters written down), AND you're interested in getting a review or two, it's best to give your readers some time to read your work. If you post chapter after chapter after chapter in a short period of time (aka, a day), the length may overwhelm potential reviewers, especially ones that like to review on a chapter-by-chapter basis. It's better to spread out the time length on a sturdy schedule. Example: one or two chapter per week. Likewise, it gives you some time to revise if necessary.

- Please double space (aka hitting enter twice) between your paragraph, even if the sentences are short (including dialogue). This is often the case when transferring from a word document to the forum. Example:


"That's not the first time he's said that, you know."
Brendan had to moisten lips before he asked, "Said what?"
"'Then there's Lucas.' He compared me to you."
"Yeah, I know. I was ... there."
Lucas continued to mock the tone of his father and Professor Rowan. "'Oh, Brendan. Your pokédex is marvelous! I can't believe you've seen so many pokémon! Your father must be proud!'"
"I–"
"'Brendan, how did you manage to do all this AND compete in the Hoenn pokémon league? You know, all Lucas does around here is research that damn lake!'"
"Well–"
"'Oh my, Brendan! You were invited to the battle tower? That's impressive! And then there's Lucas, sitting here at home, doing noth–"
"I get it, all right," Brendan snapped, eyes narrowed.
"No, you don't," muttered Lucas under his breath, turning his head to look down the beaten path. His eyes started to water, though he wouldn't dare let Brendan see. "You wouldn't understand." He sniffled, one hand wiping at his eyes furiously.This sort of formatting is very difficult to read. So before posting, go back and make sure that there is a space between each paragraph. Like so:


"That's not the first time he's said that, you know."

Brendan had to moisten lips before he asked, "Said what?"

"'Then there's Lucas.' He compared me to you."

"Yeah, I know. I was ... there."

Lucas continued to mock the tone of his father and Professor Rowan. "'Oh, Brendan. Your pokédex is marvelous! I can't believe you've seen so many pokémon! Your father must be proud!'"

"I–"

"'Brendan, how did you manage to do all this AND compete in the Hoenn pokémon league? You know, all Lucas does around here is research that damn lake!'"

"Well–"

"'Oh my, Brendan! You were invited to the battle tower? That's impressive! And then there's Lucas, sitting here at home, doing noth–"

"I get it, all right," Brendan snapped, eyes narrowed.

"No, you don't," muttered Lucas under his breath, turning his head to look down the beaten path. His eyes started to water, though he wouldn't dare let Brendan see. "You wouldn't understand." He sniffled, one hand wiping at his eyes furiously.
Even if you are double spacing in your word document (or it looks like you're double spacing), you still may sometimes fall under this error. If this is the case, a setting in your word processor is altered so it looks like you're double spacing (when it's really a single space). Commonly, it has to do with the spacing setting. Make sure the spacing before and after paragraphs is set to 0.

http://img14.imageshack.us/img14/4149/spacing.png

(This was taken in OpenOffice. If you're using that program, the spacing setting is under Format --> Paragraph --> Indent & Spacing. For Word, spacing setting is under "page layout.")

This is kind of common sense but just in case ... =P

Tonberry_King
5th March 2011, 10:27 AM
Some tippy tips:

- If you have already fully written your story (or have a good number of chapters written down), AND you're interested in getting a review or two, it's best to give your readers some time to read your work. If you post chapter after chapter after chapter in a short period of time (aka, a day), the length may overwhelm potential reviewers, especially ones that like to review on a chapter-by-chapter basis. It's better to spread out the time length on a sturdy schedule. Example: one or two chapter per week. Likewise, it gives you some time to revise if necessary.

I can take a hint. =P

Trainer Robert
5th March 2011, 3:54 PM
Hello and hi to all lol. I seem to do that, when I enter these type of threads.

Any way, after Chapter 13 of my kanto story. I am now writing out chapter 14, while using the Microsoft office programe.

I heard it's a great writer programe, but sometimes. I feel like, that I am fighting with the computer sometime's XD So curious, if any one could give advice, of how this programe works. At least, for me, it's arguing over comma's and periods placement.

Which my friend on yahoo, did let me know. It's not very good at reading those XD.

Using Word pad for writing out the chapter, then bringing that chapter to Mircosoft office, to do the editing. So yeah ^_^; Wonder if any one, could give a basic advice about that programe.

JX Valentine
6th March 2011, 4:12 AM
I heard it's a great writer programe, but sometimes. I feel like, that I am fighting with the computer sometime's XD So curious, if any one could give advice, of how this programe works. At least, for me, it's arguing over comma's and periods placement.

Which my friend on yahoo, did let me know. It's not very good at reading those XD.

....

Wonder if any one, could give a basic advice about that programe.

Turn off grammar check as you type.

Yeah, I know that sounds like a weird piece of advice, but your friend is right. Grammar check is unfortunately extremely faulty and enjoys pointing out pieces of sentences that aren't errors at all. (For example, it seems fond of pointing out sentence fragments that aren't sentence fragments.) So, your best bet is to turn it off and rely on your own English skills and those of a beta reader to polish up your chapter. There's numerous guides you can find via Google to help you out. (Even About.com has some pretty decent ones, especially when it comes to punctuating dialogue.) When in doubt about a rule, look it up.

In the meantime, you can get rid of grammar check altogether by hitting up Tools > Options > Spelling & Grammar in Word '03 and File > Options > Proofing in Word '10.

Hope this helps a little.

Estuary
25th November 2011, 10:52 PM
And this overused Pokemon stuff; I'll be a bit opinionated about this, but I don't think there is such a thing called 'overused and underused' Pokemon. A Fanfiction is a story, not something that has to be so diverse, so different from one another. For example, many people see Pikachu more as a Pokemon Idol or Hero, therefore, using him/her more. However, when they grace the walls, people are saying that they are overused and should have chosen another one. The thing is, Pokemon can be used as many times; the person using them can use them, because it is their story. You just can't classify Pokemon as those two titles, just because some are used more often. For example, if I want to use Pikachu in all of my stories, then I can because it is my story, not anyone elses. And if this part shouldn't be in here, please tell me. ^^ I went rambling a little, because I don't like to hear about overused and underused Pokemon in Fanfictions.

No, it really is a problem. When your trainer gets an Eevee for her starter, I'm going to ask why. Why is it so crucial to the plot that you get an Eevee? Why can't it be replaced with another Pokemon, one that hasn't been seen fifty billion times and who therefore will be far more memorable? When I think of Numel, I think of a good fanfiction I read years ago where the trainer started with a Numel. When I think of Eevee, I think of the hundreds of God-awful OT 'fics I have waded through, only to put down with disgust. Even if there were tons of good 'fics starring trainers with Eevees, why wouldn't you want to choose a more memorable Pokemon? There are so damn MANY, nobody is going to remember YOUR Eevee.

It's really detrimental to a story- at least, I'm certainly not going to read it. If the writer isn't mature enough to set aside their childish wants enough not to use the same Pokemon everyone else is just because 'IT'S MY FAVORITE!! IT'S CUTE AND I WANT TO WRITE ABOUT IT AND YOU GET SO MANY EEVEELUTIONS TO CHOOSE FROM'

Points to you if you actually weren't planning on having it evolve into Umbreon, Espeon, Leafeon or Glaceon, but it's still stupid. I can't even keep track of the Eeveelutions in 'fics anymore, there are so damn many. And they're so damn BORING. Little fox dog things in a variety of colors and with boring 'Dex entries that all tend to have the same personality in 'fics! Don't get me wrong- it's not a bad Pokemon. But there's not much to work with, considering what it's up against- I have never read an Eevee or Eeveelution character that interested me. It CAN be done right, but with such a stigma attached to it and so much working against you, it had better be a pretty damn extraordinarily likeable and unique Eevee. Yes, it is YOUR story and you can have whatever you like- but this is 'Advice for Aspiring Authors'. If you want to make a good 'fic that people will want to read, then don't.

Yeah, I know, I was bashing Eevee here, but it's ESPECIALLY annoying to me. But this can also be applied to Charmander/Dratini/whatever.
Do yourself a favor. Unless there is an ironclad reason that the Pokemon in question MUST be an Eevee/Charmander/Dratini, and NO OTHER Pokemon could POSSIBLY replace it, make your character tons more memorable and choose a unique starter.

Dragonfree
25th November 2011, 11:33 PM
Psst, Estuary, the post you're replying to is from 2005. As in, the 2005 that was six years ago. Ryano Ra doesn't even go here anymore. (I think? Unless I lost track of all his many username changes.) Bit of a lost cause replying to him, né?

I can't say I personally agree with your point, either. Do you generally find human characters unmemorable because every fic ever has a human in it? If it is really a good, interesting character, it doesn't need to also be a different species from everything else to set itself apart; conversely, your flat Pokébot doesn't become more interesting simply by virtue of being a Numel or whatever. If the only reason your reader remembers your Pokémon character is that they've never seen its species in any other fic, that's not the character being memorable.

Above all, the Pokémon your trainer catches should make sense. If your trainer is getting a starter from Professor Oak and he wants to be the best Fire-type trainer ever, of course he's going to pick Charmander; pretending otherwise because Charmander is overused ohnoez is ridiculous. Of course, a lot of the time trainers get Eevee or whatever in ways that make no sense whatsoever, but that's a whole other can of worms and again wholly unrelated to how many other fics happen to feature Eevee.

Which isn't to say there aren't people who are just biased against fics with overused Pokémon in them and will avoid reading your fic if it has them regardless of anything else, but I'm inclined to consider that their problem, not the author's.

Estuary
26th November 2011, 12:04 AM
I wasn't responding to that person, but I figured since nobody had commented on how hard people are making things on themselves by choosing overused Pokemon, I would comment on it. After all, it is a sticky thread entitled 'Advice for Aspiring Authors'.

And seriously, how many trainers who choose Charmander are only going to train fire-types? I have never encountered that in a 'fic. And really, out of the- what, 600?- Pokemon in existence... WHY? Usually, being a different species wouldn't make it unique and special, but in this instance... I mean, let's say that 90% of all books in existence included vampires (Hell, I wouldn't be surprised if 90% of 'fics included Charmander, Eevee, etc...). Why WOULDN'T you want to step out of the norm? Sure, you could probably include vampires into the story and have it be just as good- but if it makes no difference to the plot, why wouldn't you NOT do the same thing that's been done a million times?

I know I've read a great 'fic where somebody had a Pikachu, but goddammit, I can't remember what because I've read so many 'fics that include them. Despite the argument, that is a fact. And I know at least one other person who can't keep those 'fics straight either.

Because this is the Pokemon fandom. When I recall a story, I first remember the trainer and their team, beginning with their starter. After eight-some years of reading soley OT Pokemon 'fics, I can only specifically remember a handful of the hundreds- probably thousands- of 'fics I've read, and none of them include any of those starters- despite having read far more that DID include them. And if I can't remember them, then why would I expect anyone else to?

Dragonfree
26th November 2011, 12:49 AM
And seriously, how many trainers who choose Charmander are only going to train fire-types?
That was just an example of one possible case where giving your trainer an overused Pokémon is simply the logical thing to do. In general, any character who genuinely would pick a Charmander given the choice should pick a Charmander if they're given the choice, overusedness be damned. Anything else is just being untrue to the character.


I mean, let's say that 90% of all books in existence included vampires (Hell, I wouldn't be surprised if 90% of 'fics included Charmander, Eevee, etc...). Why WOULDN'T you want to step out of the norm? Sure, you could probably include vampires into the story and have it be just as good- but if it makes no difference to the plot, why wouldn't you NOT do the same thing that's been done a million times?
Not the best example, since you're talking about the difference between writing a world with vampires in it and a world that doesn't have vampires in it - it extends to the world, not just the characters, and that makes it pretty hard to honestly imagine an author faced with the choice of writing a book with or without vampires and having this genuinely not have a drastic effect upon the story.

Let's take another analogy. Most characters in movies by far are traditionally attractive. Of course you can roll your eyes at that. Of course it's cool when there's a character who's genuinely not. But at the same time genuinely interesting characters aren't just automatically less interesting if they're traditionally attractive, unattractive characters are not automatically interesting, and telling screenwriters they ought to make all their characters unattractive if they possibly can is just kind of bizarre - maybe it would in some sense make their films more memorable, sure, but it's just such a strange, trivial thing to latch on to among all the things that genuinely impact the quality of a story.

Also, I'd think generally one would remember a fic if the plot and characters are memorable, species of the Pokémon involved be damned, and that if all you remember is the species of the Pokémon and not the plot and characters, that means it wasn't a very interesting fic, but whatever.

Estuary
2nd December 2011, 11:38 PM
That was just an example of one possible case where giving your trainer an overused Pokémon is simply the logical thing to do. In general, any character who genuinely would pick a Charmander given the choice should pick a Charmander if they're given the choice, overusedness be damned. Anything else is just being untrue to the character.

... Because Charmander is the only fire-type starter. If your trainer is in Kanto, then sure. I'll buy that. But not in the other regions. And why start with the traditional starters, anyway? Seriously, in the game world, how many trainers do you come across who have one of the traditional starters? I don't have anything particularly against it, but you act like the only Pokemon a fire-type trainer would ever want to start with is a Charmander.

And you know what would be even more interesting? Giving a Charmander-adoring trainer a squat, unenthusiastic Bulbasaur. Because things don't always work out, and it would be so much more interesting, dammit.

The species of the Pokemon are important, because I imagine that most readers, like myself, tend to visualize everything that they read. And when I think of cool fanfiction scenes that I've 'seen', I imagine the trainer and their team. But there are too many Charmanders to keep straight. I'm not saying that a great 'fic can't include Charmander, but you can't pretend that somebody starting with one isn't automatically at a slight disadvantage.

But even if it didn't, can't people be a little more creative anyway? I love writing and reading about different pokemon. I'm considering giving one of my OC's a luvdisc, simply because I haven't read about one in an OT 'fic before. This is the POKEMON fandom, I don't want to read about one Pokemon over and over again when there are six hundred others. That's kind of the point.

Sure, they can have different personalities, but pretty much all Charmanders are going to be little orange lizards with flames on their tails who don't like water, who we have been reading about for what, fifteen years? And it's tiring.

Lucariolover22
31st December 2011, 5:34 AM
What about a mystery dungeon fic? I started out with a Chimchar, isn't that a bit overused too? Just curious.

Clare
2nd March 2012, 2:45 PM
Regarding the little discussion on overused Pokemon, both Estuary and Dragonfree have raised valid points. However, I'm inclined to feel that people shouldn't avoid using any particular species of Pokemon in their fics just because "too many people have used it already". If the Pokemon in question fits your concept of what sort of trainer your main human character should be, go ahead and use it. You could always try to balance it out by adding a few Pokemon that aren't used so often.

I appreciate Estuary's concerns, but the line between offering advice and telling people what to write and what not to write can be a very fine one. (No offence, Estuary.) If someone wants to write a story about, say, a Pikachu, they will write a story about a Pikachu; they won't change it to a story about an Electrike just because people think Pikachu is "overused". Not that there's anything wrong with stories about Electrikes . . .

Chaos Werewolf
19th March 2012, 5:20 PM
I came up with my original character set of gym leaders and elite four. however , I could only think of one name out of all 13 of them. My second gym leader and her type is the easiest to pun Grass.

my first gym leader is a geeky girl bug type trainer. She gives out the Beadle Badge when defeated.

Poppy is my second gym leader . She's a hippie. She gives up the sunny badge.

My third gym leader is an ice type trainer and Explorer. he gives out the Arctic badge.

Next I have a poison type trainer . He's an old man behind the times in a smog bellowing factory. who gets out the smog badge.

the ghost type voodoo priestess. She gets up the spirit badge.

An overweight party loving electric type trainer was also a DJ. He gives of the energy badge.

An old master Meigi like fighting type trainer. With the only badge I haven't named maybe the wax badge.

A quiet, soft spoken Goth in a fancy dress. She is the final and most powerful gym leader . She has the Glom Badge.

My Elite Four are gender flopped versions of the annoying kids from Captain Planet. because I thought it would be funny.

___ From Africa who trains ground types

From North America ___ who trains fire types

From the Soviet Union ___ who trains flying types

From Aisha ___ who trains water types.

and from South America ___ who trains normal types

CuriousHeartless
20th March 2012, 4:06 AM
Good for you Chaos Werewolf, but that is really something you should work on yourself.

While I'm here, some advice:

-I get where everyone is getting at about overused Pokemon, but I must say it really isn't quite as set as they say. Many people try and avoid what they perceive as overused even if it really isn't so I really wouldn't pay much attention to it. Use whatever Pokemon you want as long as you can make it make sense.

-Always create quirks for your characters. By quirk I don't mean making them absolutely insane acting, but everyone has there own quirks and your characters should too.

-Create a signature. It doesn't have to be big, but just something that makes a work yours. It can help make a fanfic easier to ease into if you can make it feel like yours instead of just something you write on the side.

Chaos Werewolf
30th March 2012, 10:00 PM
That's the ting I'm bad at names

especially Pokémon names half the names of my characters that are Pokémon are obvious. The other have are references and the other half are stupid.

don't believe me?

Chaos Werewolf
19th April 2012, 2:42 AM
Blaziken or Infernape?

JX Valentine
19th April 2012, 3:43 AM
Blaziken or Infernape?

Pikachu.

Seriously, depends on what you need either of them for. What's the context here?

Chaos Werewolf
19th April 2012, 5:44 AM
Venusaur's Buddy even though they argue a lot. The number two guy in terms of brute force on the team and a bit of an oddball.

JX Valentine
19th April 2012, 5:53 AM
Venusaur's Buddy even though they argue a lot. The number two guy in terms of brute force on the team and a bit of an oddball.

That doesn't really help us because either Blaziken or Infernape would work equally well in that case, and it'd really be up to personal preference on your part. If you were writing a story in which it really wouldn't be logical for one or the other to show up (e.g., if it was a story in which Venusaur's trainer was from Kanto and went around with a trainer who started in Hoenn -- meaning Blaziken would make much more sense than Infernape), then your question would be possible to answer. If it's a situation where the two of them would work equally well, then that's something you might as well decide for yourself because, well, they're your characters. That means you should be thinking about every last detail concerning who they are -- or at least the basics like what species they are, if that makes sense.

Tl;dr, if it probably doesn't matter, go with the one you like the most. If you can't decide which one you like more than the other, then I'd suggest (in all seriousness) flipping a coin.

Chaos Werewolf
19th April 2012, 6:14 AM
That's my problem my preference is a tie.

JX Valentine
19th April 2012, 6:33 AM
That's my problem my preference is a tie.

In that case, as I've said, flip a coin. The problem is that writing communities (except for FFNet) generally frown upon authors asking for people to make decisions for them -- at least, when it comes to something as basic as a character's species. In others' eyes, this tends to read as a sign that the person asking might be lacking in the creativity department. I don't mean to put it that bluntly, but what I mean to say is that if you can't figure out what species your main characters are, that doesn't say many good things about the quality of your story.

So it's really, really better in cases like these to find ways to solve those issues yourself, such as by flipping a coin to decide between two options. Or by just doing more research and figuring out what sounds more interesting to write about. I mean, monkeys and birds are sort of not the same thing, so writing about a Blaziken won't necessarily be the same as writing about an Infernape. But I can't tell you whether you'd prefer writing about a monkey or a bird, so I really can't give you a definite answer.

Chaos Werewolf
19th April 2012, 3:57 PM
okay I made my decision. But I can't decide which one of the four remaining plot relevant Pokémon that I'm going to have my character catch to be a main character while the other three are secondary characters

Main characters
* Venusaur
* Infernape
* Snorlax
* Galvantula
* Froslass

other Pokémon
* Aerodactyl
* Gastrodon
* Bronzong
* Hydreigon

I was thinking of justifying her having access to all these Pokémon by having Team Rocket running illegal breeding of operations to give their henchmen stronger Pokémon and uncommon Pokémon . And the executive in charge of it doesn't particularly care about escapes.

JX Valentine
19th April 2012, 4:20 PM
okay I made my decision. But I can't decide which one of the four remaining plot relevant Pokémon that I'm going to have my character catch to be a main character while the other three are secondary characters


The problem is that writing communities (except for FFNet) generally frown upon authors asking for people to make decisions for them -- at least, when it comes to something as basic as a character's species. In others' eyes, this tends to read as a sign that the person asking might be lacking in the creativity department. I don't mean to put it that bluntly, but what I mean to say is that if you can't figure out what species your main characters are, that doesn't say many good things about the quality of your story.

Sorry to be blunt and/or snarky, but it's really the same answer here, especially because we don't know the specifics of how these Pokémon are going to be relevant to your plot. Maybe a Bronzong and Gastrodon are going to be more appropriate than anything that can fly (and not hover). Maybe your character will need one flyer and one Pokémon that can use Surf. Likewise, just like a bird and a monkey are not the same thing, neither are a dinosaur, bell, sea cucumber, and dragon. So, if there's absolutely nothing in the plot that would call for one over the other (and I'd imagine that there would be, given that these Pokémon are actually vastly different from one another), just ask yourself what you'd prefer writing about: a dinosaur, a bell, a sea cucumber, or a dragon.

You've really got to learn how to make decisions over things like this yourself. The ability to decide the basics such as what species the character is says to a potential reader that you're capable of thinking creatively -- or at least that you're capable of writing a story yourself.

That and this really isn't a thread where people ask for opinions on specific questions like this. This is more of a tips-and-tricks thread, the kind of thread that's meant to tell you how fanfiction works. I don't mean to mini-mod, but I really think you'll want to go back and read some of the posts here carefully because reading and understanding not only what people tell you but also the threads you're posting in also reflects on your ability as an author.

Chaos Werewolf
19th April 2012, 4:54 PM
No I got to learn how to make seance I don't even understand me and more. I'm going with Gastrodon. Maybe I should stop posting sleepy.

for example I'm picturing them taking a joke too far in trying to see if they can pull off being a combining mecha.

Crystal
12th July 2012, 11:53 PM
Regarding to the choice of party Pokemon of a Trainer, I'll suggest go to the route of "representative to the characteristic of the owner". Which means, the team that will somehow reflect the personality and characteristic of that specific owner.
I'm doing this because it is just like in reality when someone go buy a car, people that has a more "masculinely powerful" personality might like BMW or the Mercedes Benz, the one with an economical mind will choose Daihatsu or the Citi Golf, the that loves speed seems to choose Audi, those arrogant upstart may go choose the expensive ones like Porche or other racecar, especially the limited edition. Just wanted to say, what they choose can indirectly reflect their personality and/or characteristic.


Currently I'm writing an original fic where there are total 5 different main characters, whereas they are all NON-BEGINNERS, hence they all possess already more than 1 Pokemon right at the beginning of the story (three has 6 Pokemon in their teams, two has 5 Pokemon in their teams). When I did my character planning before I write this story, their handheld Pokemon was one of my main concern. As I look through the list of Pokemon, I select certain Pokemons that seems best to represent the characters' characteristics, with specifically the following rules are in consideration:
1. No Legendaries;
2. The team must be balance in type, no duplicate in the Pokemon types;
3. Each team contains at most one of the "starter" pokemon;
4. The team contains pokemon from different generations, no team will consist of Pokemon only from one single generation;
5. The team should be competitively balanced, some excel in speed, some excel in power, some excel in defense, some excel in skills, etc.

Then also, I used these guidelines to narrow down the possible choices of what I have to choose:
a) Two characters participated in Pokemon League in the past, so they should possess some strong Pokemon, or at least, fully evolved Pokemon
b) One character is not professional, but not beginner either. She was in the middle of training, so she would possess some evolved Pokemon at most up to the second stage, but no fully evolved ones.
c) One character doesn't like to fight at all, whereas her position is "the healer", so she would possess some Pokemon capable to use healing moves.
d) One character is a beginner, but he possess natural potential talent to become strong trainer. So I gave him some unevolved Pokemon that seems weak at start, but has potential to become very strong.

With the help of these rules and guidelines for my selection, I think I had selected the most appropriate Pokemon that best suits my characters.

Wishing Star
21st July 2012, 2:23 AM
How much of a story should one have planned out before writing the first chapter?
So far I have four decently-sized chapters planned out, but I fear that if I start writing now, then my story will slowly degrade in quality.

Sid87
21st July 2012, 2:43 AM
How much of a story should one have planned out before writing the first chapter?
So far I have four decently-sized chapters planned out, but I fear that if I start writing now, then my story will slowly degrade in quality.

Depends. A lot of people will tell you to plot out ALL the story, but that tends to turn into "best laid plans of mice and men" situation for me. I imagine most advice you will receive will be to plot out the entire story in advance, but allow me to play Devil's Advocate for you.

A lot of times, the story I end up writing is drastically different from the story I plotted. As I'm writing the characters and the scenes, the story tends to move itself in directions I had no previously imagined. The story, to me, is a living, breathing thing that is not always entirely in my control. The characters are my alive as I write them than they were as concepts in my head, and so when I get to certain scenes in my actual writing, I literally just think "No...no, he wouldn't do that after all", and then I have to ad lib a new outcome.

Also, I tend to get writer's block if I plot out too far ahead because I end up falling in love with my later ideas and not being as interested in writing the less interesting (to me) chapters that come first. In all honesty, that is the leading cause of writer's block for me: discouragement that I'm not writing the scenes/chapters/stories that I'm more excited about.

Evilchibi_pichu
22nd July 2012, 8:10 AM
How much of a story should one have planned out before writing the first chapter?
So far I have four decently-sized chapters planned out, but I fear that if I start writing now, then my story will slowly degrade in quality.

I think it would help if you had an ending in mind. It doesn't have to be anything big or descriptive, but it's a goal of sorts so you know where you need to go in the end. And hopefully, it'll lessen any degradation in quality. For the middle, you don't need anything definite (or if you're feeling really daring, nothing at all); a sketch of a plot could work fine. I've found that if I didn't have some idea where or what to do next, I would be less motivated to write, but as Sid87 said don't stick to anything you plan, but rather let the story sort of write itself using you as a proxy. It'll not only feel more natural, but be better written for it once you hit that groove.

KumaPanda
22nd July 2012, 7:40 PM
A friend and I just started a collaboration for a fanfic. The story takes place five years after Pokemon Heartgold and Soulsilver when Red was defeated by a challenger. In the present time, legendary pokemon start to disappear for unknown reasons. Red and Green Oak(male) go to Johto to begin their search to figure out the cause of the disappearing pokemon. The story has some OCs and characters from the game.

My friend and I revised our chapters several times and posted the chapters on a fanfic website, but we barely get any feedback or comments about the story. The story starts out slow because it needs time to build up to the plot. In terms of plot, the plot doesn't start moving until perhaps around the fifth chapter. The fanfic's link is in my signature. Is there a way I can make our story get more attention? Each chapter is about 2000 words long.

JX Valentine
23rd July 2012, 1:38 AM
Is there a way I can make our story get more attention? Each chapter is about 2000 words long.

Unfortunately, you're on Fanfiction.net writing a story that doesn't capitalize on either the most popular ships or the in-vogue genre of the moment. While this would normally be a compliment, it also means that you're probably going to continue getting a small audience, regardless of how good your story actually is. That's the unfortunate thing about FFNet. You can get immense amounts of reviews (100+ for every ten chapters, for example), but in order to do it, you'd have to jump on a bandwagon of one kind or another, essentially. It really doesn't help that you've advertised that there will be shounen ai, which not a lot of people on FFNet are cool with.

But in general, the rule of thumb is project yourself, and they will come. What that means is you have to give to the community to get back from it, and that's true no matter where you go. If you want attention on a writing community, the best way to get it is by participating in it as much as possible. For FFNet, that means review everything in sight, talk a lot to authors, make a lot of friends, and maybe participate in the forums a little. For Serebii, that means reviewing a lot and posting to as many threads as possible, not just here but all over the board. It's possible that you might glean some readers from Serebii, but honestly, FFNet has a negative reputation for all kinds of shenanigans at this point. (Not to mention not a lot of people are super-willing to click links to get to your story because that reads to them like advertising.) You might as well just post your work to Serebii and do the "post to ALL THE THINGS" method if you want attention from the Serebii community.

For the other things, allow me to copypasta most of what I said on the topic (http://studio-revolution.net/advertising.php).


One of the questions I see the most frequently is this one: how do I get reviews? This comes in a variety of flavors, ranging from an actual question on a writing forum to a note attached to the fic itself complaining about a lack of reviews. Review farming itself has its own basic rules of etiquette, but to make things easier, let me just list them off in two categories: dos and don'ts.


---

Do!

1. Make sure you have an eye-catching title. While there's that old cliché "never judge a book by its cover," unfortunately, the first thing we judge of your story is its cover. Make sure your title is spelled, punctuated, and capitalized correctly. We're more likely to click on a title that is (just because clean grammar usually says to a potential reader that you're taking your work seriously and have put in the effort to clean it up). Likewise, make sure it's actually interesting. We're more likely to pick up a title that says things like "Influx Aeterna" than "The Kanto League." The first one gives off an air of mystery, whereas the second just tells us it's another original trainer story.
- 1a. Do not use tildes ( ~ ) or asterisks ( * ) in your title. Potential readers might not take your story seriously if they see that kind of thing.
[Note: This tip is outdated and depends on the community. I've also met people on Serebii who have read fics just because they had the newest region's name in the title or just because they sounded like trainer fics. It's just as good knowing how to work the crowd in order to get the highest response.]

2. If you're posting your fic on a writing archive that allows you to include a summary (such as Fanfiction.net), be sure to do the same with your summary: proofread it and make sure it's worded in a way that catches our attention. Even if you're writing a new trainer story, try to make it so that it doesn't sound like every other new trainer story out there.

3. Don't be afraid to add warnings to the summary or title of your fic. Warnings (M/M, AAML, transformation fic, rated R, et cetera) actually help advertise your story [in many cases]. While they chase away groups of your readers, they attract people who actually like some of those things you're warning about, and they can attract them in droves (particularly if the community happens to like that kind of thing).

4. If you're posting on a forum, pay attention to the stickies. Some places have areas where you can advertise your fic. Take full advantage of these threads because, hey, easy advertising, right?
- 4a. Writing archives occasionally have these if they also have discussion groups. For example, Fanfiction.net has C2 archives and forums where you can request reviewers. Try contacting C2 managers to get your fic advertised on their archives, and browse forums to find places where you can request reviewers.

5. Forums tend to have signature features. Put a link to your story in your signature (and don't be afraid to dress it up a little with BBCode, a summary, or even a banner if you've got artistic skills or can find someone who does), and post like crazy. Find places to wedge yourself into the discussion. Review other stories. Do something to make your signature be seen by more people in the writing community. The more people who see your signature, the more likely it is someone will click on the link to your story.

6. Reviewing always helps. Not only can you make friends with members of the community that way (meaning you can ask them to review your story eventually), but people who get reviewed will sometimes review you in return. In other words, be active in the writing community, and you'll get more of a response.

7. Don't be afraid to ask a reviewer directly. If you see someone reviewing on a community, try asking them through PM, e-mail, or whatever other contact means you've got if your kind of story would float their boat and if they have enough time to drop by. A lot of the time, unless busy thanks to real life, a reviewer would be happy to check out your story and leave a response.

8. There are two different kinds of stories that get the most reviews: awesome fics or terrible ones. If you want the most compliments, you'll want to aim for the "awesome fic" category. In other words, proofread. Always make sure your writing is clean, easy to read (by removing all of the errors that will trip a reader up), and enjoyable (i.e., with solid characterization, plot, and details). Never submit a story you haven't spent a lot of time not only planning out and writing but also proofreading.


---

Don't!

1. Never post to complain that you're not getting any reviews. (This includes making entire threads to complain about never getting reviewed or just derailing a topic to say it.) Potential readers tend to see this as obnoxious, so they'll actually be less likely to review or at least review you seriously.
- 1a. Don't do it in your story, either. Same deal, really.

2. On a similar note, never tell your readers that you'll post the next chapter/follow their advice after X number of reviews or that you're going to quit writing if you don't get reviews at all. This is also seen as obnoxious to future readers. Alternatively, saying that you're not going to post if your story doesn't meet a certain goal can possibly backfire because it discourages readers from posting. They'll think, essentially, that it'd be a waste of their time to review because there's a chance you won't actually continue the story.

3. Never break the rules of the forum or community to advertise your story. Always make sure you read any rules sticky, the board rules, or the guidelines of the writing community before posting anything, including advertisements to your fic. Readers usually don't want to pick up a story from an author who doesn't show the community that they actually want to be upstanding members of it. It causes you to look like a troll, basically.

4. Never demand to be reviewed, and be grateful when you get someone to look at your story, especially if you've asked them to look in the first place. Remember everything I've said in earlier guides? Here's where all of it really comes into play. A reviewer will be happier to review someone who's polite with them: someone who doesn't nag them on whether or not they've finished their review yet and someone who doesn't outright demand that they review their stuff. Likewise, they'll be happy to review your work in the future if you don't ignore them, if you say thank you, and if you try not to argue with them using any of the usual arguments I've shown you a couple guides ago. In other words, the more pleasant you are to your future and present reviewers, the more likely they'll want to review you.
- 4a. This doesn't just apply to the people you ask, either. Reviewers on communities tend to look at your response to other readers. The more polite you are to other people, the more your future readers will think you're open to reviews in general. Then, they'll think you're worth their time and sit down with your story.

5. If you want to be reviewed, don't drop off the face of the earth. It's writers who are active in the writing community who get reviewed the most often. Participate in discussions, submit helpful reviews to other writers, and generally be a productive member of that online society. The more you fit into the community as a whole and the more you let your name pop up on threads all over it, the more people will jump on your story when you post it.

6. Don't let your story die. Contrary to popular belief, going months without updates tends to make readers forget about your story, so they'll be less likely to jump on it when a new chapter comes along. Alternatively, they'll assume you've abandoned your story (which isn't exactly an uncommon practice in any fandom), or they'll just not want to go back through pages upon pages of thread titles to finally get to yours. Update frequently enough to balance quality with keeping your story within the first few pages of the thread list. That way, your readers will know you're still interested in continuing, and they'll be more likely to see your story and be reminded that they have yet to read the next chapter.

7. Conversely, don't update too quickly. Posting three chapters a day tends to heap tons of material onto a reader, especially if they're lengthy chapters. (It can also say you're not actually serious about writing a quality story if your chapters are brief and haven't been proofread.) The more material you give a reader to look over, the longer they'll put it off for when they have time to sit down and read through it. Of course, if you add more material to this pile, they'll just keep putting it off. It's not exactly common for a reader to go through all of your chapters in a few sittings unless you're already an established writer. (For example, a person will read through forty or more chapters if you're already getting a lot of reviews for your work as it is. They won't do that if you're a new face to the community because you don't have that same following of readers that will encourage them to join in your fanbase.)

8. Never lose patience. It's very rare to get a ton of reviews right away, and it'll take a lot of hard work to get to that point. Follow the above steps and put a lot of effort, both into the advertising end of things and the story itself. While I can't tell you that you'll eventually be a writing sensation, I can tell you that after awhile of exposure and after putting a lot of care into your work, you'll get at least a decent following of readers.


---

In other words, getting more reviews for your fic isn't a particularly difficult process. It's a matter of knowing how the community works, combined with communication skills and understanding what readers are thinking. Sure, that sounds like a hard formula, but all I'm saying is know your community. Make friends. Read the rules. Participate in discussions. Review. Be an awesome person to hang around. All of this can boost your review count pretty easily.

Of course, there's other factors that go into all of this, such as the concept of the fic itself. Reviewers will tend to tackle fics with plots that happen to be in vogue at a particular time. For example, on Fanfiction.net these days, more people will review stories where readers can submit original characters than pretty much anything else. If you want to really get a lot of reviews, sure, go with the "in" plots, but otherwise, it's really just all about how well you get along in the community.

That's all I can offer in terms of advice for reviewing and being reviewed. For those of you who made it all the way through at least one of these guides, thanks to all of you. I hope some parts of this will help you in the future, and best of luck to each and every one of you.

Hope that helps!

KumaPanda
23rd July 2012, 3:31 AM
Thanks a bunch! I'll be sure to kept this in mind.

Aakash98
2nd September 2012, 3:29 PM
Now I've got a crisis I here I want to write something, but I want to ask whether to classify this as a roleplay or a fanfiction. Now I don't know if this could be considered a fanfiction or a Roleplay, because I would require other people to send me characters, but that is the only interactive part of the entire story. The rest of the story would be in the format of a normal fanfiction, so read this as some sort of prologue and can you tell me what to submit it as

There was an empty studio, which was only occupied by a Male Chandelure named Chandler and a Bisharp named Blade

Chandler: So Blade do you think this is a good idea for a contest

Blade: Of course it is , why don't you explain to our audience about this

Chandler sighs

Chandler: Fine, Welcome to Total Pokemon Island where 28 pokemon will compete will compete for several months for the cash prize of 1,000,000,000 Poke Dollars.In this story we want you submit your OCs through the messages, then I will select 28 pokemon to compete on our show. Below us is the OC application form

Name: ( You can name your pokemon anything you want, but please nothing with bad language)

Species: (Any Pokemon can be entered, with the exception of Legendaries, as they will make cameos)

Gender: ( You must consider Pokemon like Magnemite with a gender, despite the games

Age: 14-20

History: (You should tell about your Pokemon's life history or why they entered this contest

Personality: ( Tell how your character acts, is he a good guy or a bad guy, I want at least one bad guy

Unique traits: Now I don't want any Mary-Sues. Nobody is perfect. I understand if the Pokemon does have unique moves or has any colour differences

Relationship:Yes/No, If you say yes, then who with or could you describe the ideal personality for a love interest for that character)

Fear: ( Everyone has a fear)

Evolve: Yes/No

Extra:

I will allow you to submit 3 characters per user

I'll use the hosts as examples:
Name: Chandler

Species: Chandelure

Gender: Male

Age: 34 ( I know he is older than the limit, but he is an adult host

Personality: Chandler is very calm at times, he doesn't fight unless provoked, if you make him mad your dead. He is very secretive about his emotions, as his depressed mainly at times, but he will play nice

History: Chandler orignally lived in the Celestial Tower in Unova, but one day a trainer tried to catch his son and his wife sacrificed her own life to save their son, so he has emotional problems and he has gave up on hope to humans, but he likes only Pokemon, so he along with his friend made a contest to meet Pokemon not humans

Fear: The trainer who killed his wife

Evolve: No


Name: Blade

Species: Bisharp

Gender: Male

Age: 33

Personality: He is mainly a loner, but he really wants to make a lot of friends, which makes him calm and quiet at times Despite having a bad past he is respectful, he made the competition to make friends

History: He was abused by his trainer to the point Blade ended up running away and ever since then Blade became depressed and alone wandering the world. This trainer killed Chandler's wife

Evolve: No

Fears:Seeing his abusive trainer

I'll accept 28 characters before we start

So here is the prologue, can you tell me what to upload it as

Sid87
2nd September 2012, 3:59 PM
Now I've got a crisis I here I want to write something, but I want to ask whether to classify this as a roleplay or a fanfiction. Now I don't know if this could be considered a fanfiction or a Roleplay, because I would require other people to send me characters, but that is the only interactive part of the entire story. The rest of the story would be in the format of a normal fanfiction, so read this as some sort of prologue and can you tell me what to submit it as


So is it a thing where readers interact as a character or is it a story where the readers choose the direction of the tale (like a Choose Your Own Adventure, but the readers do more than make rudimentary choices, they actually assist in defining the characters)?

JX Valentine
2nd September 2012, 5:23 PM
If the only interactive part of your fic is the fact that you're requiring people to send you characters, then it's a fanfic. If people are actually going to be writing what happens to those characters, then it's a roleplay.

As a note, there are several things I would advise against here.

1. Asking for characters. Yes, that sort of thing is immensely popular on FFNet, but there are things people do on FFNet that you shouldn't be doing (either there or on other writing communities). Here, for example, people tend to look down on character submission fics because there's numerous pitfalls. First and foremost, the people who know a character the best are the people who created them themselves. As in, if you ask for characters, you automatically set yourself up for a difficult time because you won't be as familiar with the characters you receive as the person who sent them. This will make later chapters difficult as you not only juggle multiple characters whose personalities and backstories you barely know anything about but also as you spend more and more time attempting to force the main submitted characters you're using into characterizations that don't fit who they were to begin with. In other words, you'd be flying blind -- attempting to fit a round peg into a round hole that's slightly too small.

The second drawback, of course, is that creating an entire cast of submitted characters or creating only a few characters yourself and requiring the readers to submit the rest tends to send the message that you're too lazy to come up with your own characters, so you have to go the extra mile to prove that you're a competent writer. And that means proofreading the crap out of your work, getting it betaed, and really thinking about your plot and how those characters fit into your story. Sure, you may argue that you're doing that now... but glancing over your prologue (is it really only five lines long?), you could stand to be a bit more careful in all of those areas.

2. Script fic. Yes, we have one on our forums that hasn't been closed. No, that doesn't mean everyone should do it. It's difficult to write a script fic and pull it off adequately; most of the time, it's simply used as an easy way out in lieu of using prose. In other words, new writers tend to use script fic because they think it would allow them to write a fic that's primarily dialogue with very little in between (cutting out a step) or that can be written very quickly in general. That is not a good way to write a fanfiction. The reason why is because fanfiction isn't a visual medium. The reader can't see what's going on, so they need to be supplied with things like details and, heck, actions in order to completely understand what's going on in a scene. (If the script was actually going to be acted out, that'd be a different story, but even then playwrights -- yes, Shakespeare included -- would provide a lot of hints as to what's going on so that the director and actors can visualize what should be done in each scene.) Moreover, if you write a fanfiction too quickly (chapter a day, for example, and written in the post reply box to boot), that opens the door for a lot of errors in your work, which in turn would make it more difficult for a reader to get through.


...That and you'd be in competition with this fic (http://www.serebiiforums.com/showthread.php?583312-Total-Pok%E9mon-Drama-The-Island-(PG-14)) -- which, while not perfect, avoids a lot of these problems on top of being a pretty decent fic to begin with.

So... yeah. I'd just recommend rethinking what you're doing here. You may be running headlong into a pretty difficult scenario.

Aakash98
2nd September 2012, 7:01 PM
Firstly What I said before wasn't the prologue it would be just like an example of script for your judgement like a prologue of a story. Additionally, I may make changes to the prologue if the story was approved.

Also I like people making their own characters, because then a variety of characters could be added, so it was would be less the same then other fics with a generic sense of customly made characters by the user for example: a tough guy, a loner etc. I went fanfiction.net and almost all the most reviewed Total Pokemon Island fics on Fanfiction.net used the format to submit your own character, so I followed the trend. My first intention was to make my own characters, but I just found it interesting for someone else to make their own characters, I hope you don't disapprove of my idea

I may change the script format to paragraphs with lots of detail if that suits you

JX Valentine
3rd September 2012, 2:08 AM
Firstly What I said before wasn't the prologue

But... you labeled it as a prologue at the end of your post. O_o


Additionally, I may make changes to the prologue if the story was approved.

So is it a prologue or isn't it?


Also I like people making their own characters, because then a variety of characters could be added,

Any writer can create a variety of characters by themselves. Most writers don't stick to just one type of character.

That and this would be a variety of characters you wouldn't be fully familiar with because, well... they're not your characters.


so it was would be less the same then other fics with a generic sense of customly made characters by the user for example: a tough guy, a loner etc.

Actually, just because you're shafting the responsibility of creating characters on someone else doesn't mean that you'll suddenly have a non-generic cast. I mean, think of it like this. You're giving up control over who you can include to someone else. As a result, if tons of people want to create tough guys and if tons of people have the exact same skill level with characters, then you're going to get tons of tough guys who are basically the same in terms of personality. There's no reason to believe that you're going to get a full variety of characters because you don't know who's going to be submitting what. You could even get some serious Mary Sues.


I went fanfiction.net and almost all the most reviewed Total Pokemon Island fics on Fanfiction.net used the format to submit your own character, so I followed the trend.

Again, lots of people do things on FFNet (read: Fanfiction.net) that are not good ideas. Character submission fics are extremely popular and have been for the past couple of years, but it's very, very rare to have one that's actually good. If you take that idea somewhere else (like Serebii), then we'll be looking at the quality of your fic, not whether or not it's following a trend (for the most part). That kind of thing just doesn't fly until you're already established as a good writer.

Also, following trends is not a good thing to do if you're a writer. That says a lot more about your creativity, and if you go anywhere but FFNet, that means you're probably not going to be sending a good message to potential readers. Readers (off FFNet) tend to look for fics that are either well-written or new and different -- preferably both. To say that you're just going to follow a trend doesn't tell potential readers that you're original.


My first intention was to make my own characters, but I just found it interesting for someone else to make their own characters, I hope you don't disapprove of my idea

Again, I highly, highly suggest you rethink things because this is not FFNet. Certain things just won't fly here, especially given the fact that there's been a lot of threads that have been getting locked in this forum because they weren't that well thought-out or carefully written.

Aakash98
3rd September 2012, 10:05 AM
Ok I'll think about this idea for a while

jireh the provider
18th September 2012, 10:48 AM
From experience in writing fanfics, certain audiences and writers place suggestive background music on the stories they read/create. It gives them a pedigree sense of understanding the circumstances of the story. I can share you guys an example from my Feli Chronicles:


Last chapter:

“Oh my goodness! I’ve never expected my brother to give us something so beautiful!” I’m just dumbstruck. “Here you go little baby. Hold on to it. Lemme get my papers and—“



Celena’s POV:

(Play the Background Music: Pokemon Mystery Dungeon Explorers of Sky – I Saw Something Again ; Story’s Theme: Disturbance)

“Lucas! That’s the stone!” Mien Rin react the quickest while we catch up to see this one orb holding that unknown sickness. I just grabbed that orb and placed it on the table without thinking. It’s just gives me a sense of foreboding. Just when Keema’s husband is about to pick it up, I snatched it away.

“WHOA THERE YOUNG LADY! No hurt but you are getting quite tense on that thing!” Like I should not, Trim.

“Don’t you know what’s in this one?!” I was frantic. But … , “Oh no! What am I fearing? Why am I feeling like this?”

“Heyhey! What the hassle goin on here?” that is until Keema faced me. “Miss Celena. Are you okay?! Seems like you are spooked by that present that my bro gave me! I just hope that my man didn’t do something to ya. Or the other way around that is.” Oh no, I got to do something. I made quite a mess. “Young man, do something to her. Seems that she just saw a fading spirit that rose from the ground.”

“Sweetheart. Just give some composure to your reaction.” Lucas made it easier said than done.

“It’s easier said than done! This orb holds-“ Just as I stopped, I heard ringing bells. After a few seconds, I was speechless.

“I hate repeating it again maam but you are making yourself look insaaaaaaAAHHH!” Just as Keema screamed, the orb that I’m holding shines a very bright red that it enveloped all of us inside. Then I just passed out

(End music)

Not only does give practice in story writing but it can be used in other ways too. Like if your story is for a video game. Or a fanfic. Music and Fanfic cand mend very nicely. But in personal favored music, you want background music than Lyrical Music on the fanfics you made. Lyrical music is nice but it can be challenging to mend not just the music and the story, but you have to synch the lyrics of your music to the fanfic you are making.

JX Valentine
18th September 2012, 12:34 PM
From experience in writing fanfics, certain audiences and writers place suggestive background music on the stories they read/create. It gives them a pedigree sense of understanding the circumstances of the story. I can share you guys an example from my Feli Chronicles:

[I]

Not only does give practice in story writing but it can be used in other ways too. Like if your story is for a video game. Or a fanfic. Music and Fanfic cand mend very nicely. But in personal favored music, you want background music than Lyrical Music on the fanfics you made. Lyrical music is nice but it can be challenging to mend not just the music and the story, but you have to synch the lyrics of your music to the fanfic you are making.

Can I just say I'm not sure how to feel about this kind of thing? On the one hand, hey, interactivity. On the other, you don't make it optional when you put it smack in the middle of a chapter. When you do something like this, it's extremely jarring for some readers because we have to take the time to open a music player (or YouTube) to queue up music that wasn't actually written specifically for your piece (meaning it's at best a close approximation of the feel you want for your fic, rather than a good embodiment of it, if that makes sense) instead of simply read your work. And even if a reader decides not to follow the directions, they still have to stop for a second because you put it smack in the middle of your writing, rather than let them read on through the chapter. (It's the same principle as why you shouldn't put POV headers or flashback headers or scene headers smack in the middle of a chapter too.) It's also not a good thing to rely on because of the fact that you should be creating atmosphere through your writing; if you can't convey the emotion of a scene through words, there's just something wrong.

So instead of telling me that your work is interactive, it actually says to me that the writing is actually amateurish if I see links to music literally smack in the middle of your work. Granted, if you want to say "here's some music that a scene was inspired by; you can queue it up when you reach it for added effect" in the author's notes before or after a chapter, by all means go for it, but don't do it smack in the middle of a chapter because that's jarring and because you shouldn't be implying that we need the music in order to enjoy your work. Good writing can and should be enjoyed with or without bells and whistles, no pun intended.

jireh the provider
19th September 2012, 6:03 AM
Ahh, I see. Just place suggestive music as an option on the Start or end of the story, not in the middle. Well, That helps.

ChaosCaptain
5th January 2013, 10:33 AM
I'm still pretty new to writing in a non-academic setting but I have learned a few useful things:

Names: There's nothing wrong with ordinary names but I usually try to find names that fit the character, I've even made some up (IE: Aven from my mystery dungeon story, I made her name from a latin root)

Music: try writing to orchestral music, it helps to accent the mood. (I suggest Hans Zimmer)

Character: It may sound corny but your characters shold feel like people (or pokemon) that you could have convesations with. Don't make someones sole charcteristic a keen sense of sarcasm or a kind heart, make them layered and complex.

Maveox
20th January 2013, 8:42 AM
I'm not sure if anyone checks this anymore, but I have a few questions I was hoping experienced authors could answer.

1) How long should each chapter be (roughly) in Microsoft Word?

2) How thoroughly do you plan out the story? Anywhere from having a detailed plan of each chapter to having a basic outline of the plot.

3) Do you post chapters as soon as you finish them, or do you wait until you are a certain number of chapters ahead?

4) Any pre-writing tips for me? I have the basic plot done, but what techniques do you use to brainstorm?

Thanks a bunch to whomever answers this!

Liz Azzimagica
20th January 2013, 9:06 AM
I'm not sure if anyone checks this anymore, but I have a few questions I was hoping experienced authors could answer.

1) How long should each chapter be (roughly) in Microsoft Word?

2) How thoroughly do you plan out the story? Anywhere from having a detailed plan of each chapter to having a basic outline of the plot.

3) Do you post chapters as soon as you finish them, or do you wait until you are a certain number of chapters ahead?

4) Any pre-writing tips for me? I have the basic plot done, but what techniques do you use to brainstorm?

Thanks a bunch to whomever answers this!

Well this is what I learned as I improved my writing with my fanfic:

1. How long each chapter is is depentant of the story, but I recomine 10-20 pages

2. I tend to think out the basic plot then try to draw inspiration from others around me when it comes to details, even if you have the basic plot, it never hurts to draw new ideas from talking to people that are interested in what your writing.

3. I tend to post chapters soon as I finish them because with all the detail I get into, it can take a week or more per chapter. remember, writing is an art form so it's something that cannot be rushed if you want your ideas to flow together.

4. Again with brainstorming...sometimes you can draw your inspiration just from talking to people and while it's not a pre-writing tip...my ultiment tip is never second guess yourself (unless your sure wth conviction the idea won't work) and if you run into writter's block...walk away and take a walk outside. that walk helps to clear your head and possibly draw new ideas. O and one last thing...don't be scared to act out parts of your story because if they can't come alive for you, how will they for the reader?

Mogar
20th January 2013, 9:58 AM
Just a small question, when writing which of the three points of view is the most powerful? First Person, Second person, or third person?

Phoenixsong
20th January 2013, 11:11 AM
The short answer is that there is no "most powerful" point of view when talking about writing in general. Different points of view work best for different stories and different methods of storytelling. How much information do you want the reader to know about what's going on, especially if it's something they might potentially learn about before it happens to the characters? Who are the characters in the story, and who should the reader know the most about or identify the most closely with? Whose story are you telling in the first place? All of these things go into choosing a point of view, and because the answers are different for each story it means that the most "powerful" way to tell one may not be the most "powerful" way to tell another.

Most people will tell you to avoid second person, generally because it tends to be the most difficult of the three to write appropriately. That's not to say that it can't be done—there are some very moving and well-executed fics that were written in second person POV. Second-person stories use the pronoun "you", so you're implying that the reader is the one going through the events of the story. On the one hand you could almost say that this makes second person the most powerful POV of the three, because it more or less means that your reader "is" the one having the argument or "is" the one experiencing a painful loss. It's arguably the quickest way to attempt to punch someone right in the feels, to oversimplify it. On the other hand, however, you generally have to write extremely well to make your reader feel that involved with what's going on as opposed to just confused, and to make the reader feel like they could actually be this person even though they're not. If the main character deals with his problem by drinking himself into a stupor but your reader would never touch alcohol, they're not going to feel any real connection to your hard-drinking protag and the effect is lost—the story is supposed to be "about them", but "they" just did something that they would never do. (For that matter, even seemingly small issues like the character's gender being different from the reader's can cause that disconnect and thus make second person POV less effective.) It takes a bit of work to really overcome a hurdle like that, and simply put it may not be worth trying if it's not critical for the reader get that deep into the character's head. Certainly the reader won't feel so awkward about the drinking character if they're just observing him as opposed to being him.

Someone else may want to come in and elaborate with some examples of effective uses of each viewpoint; I'm tired and really ought to be heading off to bed now. The upshot really is that it does depend on the story in question, though. Rather than looking for a blanket "best" POV for all stories you'll ever write, you should consider which POV will best serve your purposes for this one story now.

IJuggler
20th January 2013, 4:35 PM
I'm not sure if anyone checks this anymore, but I have a few questions I was hoping experienced authors could answer.

1) How long should each chapter be (roughly) in Microsoft Word?

2) How thoroughly do you plan out the story? Anywhere from having a detailed plan of each chapter to having a basic outline of the plot.

3) Do you post chapters as soon as you finish them, or do you wait until you are a certain number of chapters ahead?

4) Any pre-writing tips for me? I have the basic plot done, but what techniques do you use to brainstorm?

Thanks a bunch to whomever answers this!

Chapters can be as long as the story needs, though Serebii has a reasonable minimum of at least 2 pages.

I've written a story with very little planning and only some vague thoughts of the ending, and it turned out fairly well. It really depends on the type of story you're writing, though; if you're trying to make an intriguing mystery, it would definitely help to know who the villain is, and if you're writing shorter piece you may want to know all the details before putting in too many empty words.

But really, the most important characteristic of planning I find is to nail down the characters. If you know what each character is like and is going to respond to a situation, you could take the story into many different directions.

After I finish a chapter I tend to wait about a week, maybe more, just to revise and reread and get a good feeling on it. I'm trying to put across certain emotions subtly, and if I'm not careful I end up stepping on those, or making silly mistakes like having a cool autumn breeze turn into a stifling summer day later on.

Pre-writing tips? I've got two, actually.
1) Type up a word. After that, put another one after it.
2)Repeat step 1-2 until story is complete.

For me, I find the biggest problem is just sitting down and doing it. Sometimes I'll find myself wasting half an hour to an hour just looking up tips on how to write well...not the most productive use of writing time, I think. Good luck!

JX Valentine
20th January 2013, 8:00 PM
1) How long should each chapter be (roughly) in Microsoft Word?

However long it takes for you to get everything you want to get done in a chapter done. Sometimes, you might take twenty pages to do that. Sometimes, you might only need four. Focus on the specific scenes you want your chapter to cover, and remember that you don't necessarily have to aim for a set number of pages every single time.

But yeah, as IJuggler said, so long as you write more than two pages, you're good to go. (And even then, the mods will make an exception for you if the chapter in question is awesomely written.)


2) How thoroughly do you plan out the story? Anywhere from having a detailed plan of each chapter to having a basic outline of the plot.

Depends on your comfort level. Lots of people don't really do much planning, but then you've got others who know every detail of their story. Every writer works differently, so experiment with planning and rolling with whatever idea pops into your head to see which one works best for you.

As for myself, it depends. Some fics, I don't plan. Others, I do. I know how my main fic ends; I don't know how my parody fic does. It just feels right to do what I do for both stories.


3) Do you post chapters as soon as you finish them, or do you wait until you are a certain number of chapters ahead?

Personally? Post as I finish.

However! There's a lot to be said about waiting too, and some authors on this site have done that. You have more of a cushion if you hold off on posting, so you're more likely to maintain a reliable update schedule, which readers will appreciate thoroughly. On the other hand, if you work too far ahead, you're also less flexible. Say a good number of reviewers give you comments that say your plot makes no sense or your dialogue is punctuated completely wrong. In order to make the changes that will keep people from deciding they don't want to follow your fic anymore, you'd have to make changes to all of the chapters you've written in advance, not just the one you just posted and your WIP next chapter.

So what you want to do really depends on what you're going for. If you want more of a cushion in order to maintain a good update schedule (which itself will attract readers), go with waiting to post chapters. If you really want feedback and the ability to develop your story, go with posting them as soon as you finish proofreading them the first time.


4) Any pre-writing tips for me? I have the basic plot done, but what techniques do you use to brainstorm?

Keep a separate word processing document for any notes, lines, or scenes that pop into your head as you write, even if you're going to be one of those folks who don't plan out their stories in detail. It's easier to keep things organized for longer fics.

Also?


Pre-writing tips? I've got two, actually.
1) Type up a word. After that, put another one after it.
2)Repeat step 1-2 until story is complete.

Yeeeeep.



Can't really add to Phoenix's post about POVs because she's spot-on about how there's no such thing as a stronger or weaker POV in general. It's really dependent on your story.

If it helps, here's a run-down of all the POV possibilities and what they do.

First Person
What It Is: You tell the story from the perspective of a character in your fic. Any character. Doesn't even have to be the main hero. (Sherlock Holmes, anyone?) Either way, the most prominent pronouns are first-person ones. I, me, my.
Pros: It connects you to a character and evokes the sense of being talked to. Not only do you get a better view of who that character is by being presented their voice at all times, but you also feel like you're in a conversation with them or like they're old-timey storytellers who are passing along their adventures via some oral narration magic.
Cons: You're severely limited in what you can say. Think of it like this: a person is telling you a story. Sometimes, they subconsciously let their opinions of a person or situation color their stories. (Have you ever told a story, and the events you talked about were worse or more exciting than they actually were? Same phenomenon.) While this is actually a great way to develop a character (because you could have them sing praises for another character or outright become an unreliable narrator if you wanted), ultimately, it means you have to be careful with your characterization of that single character at all times, rather than just when they show up. Moreover, it's impossible to convey events or information that the narrator hasn't experienced or doesn't know unless that character happens to be God or god-like. Y'know. Pretty obvious. But that means you have to either switch to another person (which can be jarring and tends to mark you down as an amateur, especially if you do it mid-chapter) or switch to another point of view (which can also jarring).
Examples: Any Sherlock Holmes story actually written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (non-canon stories are usually written in third person). The Hunger Games.

Second Person
What It Does: Either of two things. It keeps the gender of the main character ambiguous (if there's a plot-related reason for it), or it puts you, the reader, in the shoes of the main character. Prominent pronouns are you and yours.
Pros: It's difficult to pull off but well worth it if you do. Stories done in second person feel more interactive to a reader, and they achieve higher levels of that "being talked to" feeling than first person gets across. In either case, it relies on both ambiguity and detail at the same time. Your main goal, especially with the latter purpose (putting the reader in the shoes of the main character) is to make that reader feel like they're experiencing the story. For that reason, while you can develop a character out of this, you'll ultimately need to keep personal details about the character they're assuming to a minimum. Even divulging whether that character is male or female should only be done if it's absolutely plot-relevant. Otherwise, your focus is more on conveying a lot of feelings and sensations so that the reader can imagine what it's like to be in the story, so it turns into a challenge in terms of the balancing act between too much and too little detail that's appropriate for your story, if that makes sense.
Cons: Ambiguity is a difficult thing to master, especially if you're used to any of the other modes. Moreover, like I said, it's a difficult point of view to work with. There's a lot of ways you can fall flat on your face, just because your story isn't developed enough to enable a reader to experience it without feeling as if the story is being forced. Phoenix pretty much summed it up better than I can here.
Examples: Oh, The Places You'll Go (by Dr. Seuss). Any choose-your-own adventure story. Homestuck (the first acts).

Third Person Omniscient
What It Is: The narrator is God. They're a nameless, invisible participant in the story in that they're everywhere and can see everything all at once. There's no focus on any particular character; you get every character's thoughts, backstory, reactions, and so forth. Prominent pronouns are he, she, it, they, and their variants.
Pros: There's a reason why a lot of writing does it. You aren't bound to a particular character, so it's the most flexible to work with. This doesn't mean it's the weakest point of view by default. It means that you have to exercise restraint and choose which details you should convey and which you shouldn't. Besides, it enables you to worry less about how you're going to get information across (because you have all channels open and at the ready) and more about building a tone and atmosphere.
Cons: It's very easy to mistake third person omniscient for third person limited. You'll have to remember that omniscient doesn't focus on any particular character; it focuses on every single one of them at the same time. On the other hand, this confusion (i.e., the fact that everyone makes this mistake and struggles with IDing the difference) also allows you to slide into limited seamlessly, so that's not much of a con. What is, though, is remembering that subtlety is the key. It's never a good thing to convey everything all at once. That seems like a no-duh situation, but tons of writers make the mistake of saying more than they actually need to say.
Examples: Practically every novel in existence. The older, the more likely to be omniscient. I'd highly recommend Leo Tolstoy's Anna Karenina or George Eliot's Middlemarch, although that's not so much because they're fantastic examples of omniscient but more because they're fantastic novels, period.

Third Person Limited (or Subjective)
What It Is: The narrator is God, and God plays favorites. It chooses a single character and focuses on them, filtering out all the thoughts and details of all the characters around them. In other words, it's a lot like telling a story in first person, only you're using he/she/it/they instead.
Pros: In a lot of ways, it gives you the best of both third person omniscient and first person POV. You get the character development of first person (because you're hanging out with a single character a lot), but you also enable the reader to feel like they're watching, rather than being talked to. This can sometimes make a reader feel more like they're right there in the scene with a character, rather than sitting down with them after the fact. That means it can be more immersive than first person and more intimate than third omniscient.
Cons: It suffers from the same problem as omniscient (in that lots of people can't really tell the difference between omniscient and limited), but unlike omniscient, that con can actually hurt your effectiveness with limited. The whole aim of this game is to focus on one character at a time. That's it. Once you branch out and cover two or more in a single scene or chapter, you end up switching back to omniscient, and the point shifts from the character to the plot. In other words, you have to be conscious of who your narrator is focusing on. Shifting away from them to the grand scheme of things or to different characters within the same scene causes your story to be less about a character acting through a plot and more a plot acting on the characters. Or in short, you end up defeating the purpose of the point of view if you shift.
Examples: A Song of Ice and Fire (chapter-based limited). Most fairy tales.

Third Person Objective
What It Is: The narrator is a nameless invisible bystander who is not God. Unlike the other two breeds of third person POV, this does not give you a character's thoughts or feelings. It's an objective view of events, much like a report or a newspaper article. As such, it's removed from all of the characters, and it uses he/she/it as well.
Pros: Another tough one to work with, but it's worth it if you can pull it off. As the opposite end of the spectrum to omniscient, objective provides the facts of the story without coloring it with a character's voice or opinions. Because of that, it can actually provide a rather dramatic view of events by removing the readers from the characters and allowing them to draw their own conclusions. Not to mention it's frequently used to create a starker tone to a story because readers are watching characters all at once, rather than jumping in and out of their heads at any given moment. It's also fantastic at producing subtlety because effective use of third person objective means you're limited in what information you can convey because you're not omniscient. (See the example for this idea in action.)
Cons: Try telling a story without getting into the heads of your characters. It's not that easy. That's why you'd need to be careful about your details, and you'd probably benefit from being a pretty good writer in the first place. Either way, while the boundaries between it and both omniscient and limited are far clearer than the boundaries between omniscient and limited themselves, a lot of the challenge with writing in third person objective hinges on your ability to resist the temptation to switch to any other third-person POV.
Examples: Hemingway does this a lot, but the go-to example for objective POV tends to be his short story, Hills Like White Elephants.

To be fair, the last three (i.e., all three third person POV entries) are technically under one category, and the difference is in the narrative voice, rather than the POV itself. In other words, the above list is a lot like saying, "birds, cats, Great Danes, poodles, and collies." On the other hand, they're also extremely distinct from one another, so I'm just going to go ahead and leave them that way. You get the idea anyway.

There's also epistolary work (which tells a story through documents, a la Dracula) and works that just plain alternate between narrative modes, but let's face it. They're usually one of the above five possible points of view. Just covering this base because someone's probably going to go to Wikipedia at some point.

And for shiz and giggles, one more because it's getting popular!

Script
What It Is: You tell a story through script. Technically, there is no narrator except via stage directions (which are typically objective point of view because thoughts are told in first person by the acting characters) because you're cutting out practically everything but dialogue.
Pros: If done well, it can make a work seem more dynamic. A reader isn't just reading through a scene; they're also watching it in motion.
Cons: Very few people do it well. No, before anyone offers the recent batch of script fics as examples, they wouldn't count. In any case, it's difficult to work with because lots of people mistake this mode for the easy route. They think that by cutting out everything but dialogue, they'll come up with an effective script. Except that's not true. You have to exert a lot of effort in order to pull a script fic off. You need to know how much detail you should convey without going overboard (hint: it's more detail than one would think), and you have to ensure your characters are well-developed because you're relying on them to tell your story. Every step of the way, you'll also have to remember that scripts are meant to be acted out, so you're constantly asking yourself whether or not the actors can perform the scene with exactly what you're giving them.
Examples: Try any script that's been at one point professionally acted. (Scripts from TV shows, movies, stage plays, and so forth.) Do not use scripts written by amateurs (especially script fics) as the examples you refer to, and don't limit yourself to Shakespeare.

So, yeah. Each has their own pros, their own cons, and their own reasons for being used. There's no particular one that's stronger than another because they're all so very different in terms of how they tell a story and what kinds of information they can present. There's just different levels of challenge in handling one instead of another. However! As a writer, you should be up for challenges anyway, so don't feel intimidated or that you need to avoid one point of view when it's actually the best mode to use for telling your story.

Maveox
21st January 2013, 4:07 AM
For me, I find the biggest problem is just sitting down and doing it. Sometimes I'll find myself wasting half an hour to an hour just looking up tips on how to write well...not the most productive use of writing time, I think. Good luck!

I definitely understand this. In the past, I've had problems with fics of mine dying out, and I really wanted to make sure the one that I'm working on will have some staying power, ya know? But I'll make sure to think about overthinking... I think.

Liz and JX, thanks a bunch. Just needed a few pointers to make sure I was going in the "write" direction.
..... that might have been my worst pun ever.

Liz Azzimagica
22nd January 2013, 8:44 AM
Liz and JX, thanks a bunch. Just needed a few pointers to make sure I was going in the "write" direction.
..... that might have been my worst pun ever.

haha, that pun made my night :P but yeah, glad we could help you out, best of luck to you and your writting. O one last tip: music can be a powerful writing tool cause if you listen to a song/instermental music then you can better invision your story