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Strants
15th July 2008, 10:59 PM
Mainstreaming is most easily defined as putting special needs children in 'regular' schools. before we begin, I'd like you to read these two articles. On is pro-mainstreaming (http://www.4children.org/news/103spec.htm), the other anti-mainstreaming (http://weblogs.baltimoresun.com/news/education/blog/2007/11/the_specialeducation_debate_is.html).

Personally, I am against mainstreaming. Some mentally disabled children may not adapt well in a classroom made to serve the lowest common denominator. There are also disciplinary problems, some of which have resulted in student death. (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/15/health/15restraint.html?_r=1&ref=science&oref=slogin) Also, some students may make friends more easily with similar peers.

Debate.

Carlisle
15th July 2008, 11:17 PM
They should be put into society, certainly. But some areas are just not best for the mentally handicapped. Schools, for instance. Anyone with half a brain sees how these people get treated by their peers. Their needs to be more specialized schools for the handicapped, that operate just like public schools. Obviously, the government should do something about it. So I'm against full mainstreaming. The typical school systems just aren't able to handle this.

ImJessieTR
16th July 2008, 4:00 AM
Perhaps it is the normal people who should be mainstreamed, teaching them things like empathy and compassion for those who are different. On the other hand, there are those who need more one-on-one care before getting tossed out into situations they have no skills to handle.

Strants
16th July 2008, 5:25 AM
Perhaps it is the normal people who should be mainstreamed, teaching them things like empathy and compassion for those who are different. True. But at the same time, one must consider that a mental handicap may distort someone's personality. Special needs kids can seem violent and aggressive at times: those are traits that we teach our children are bad. You can say that skin color doesn't affect what's inside. You can say that wealth doesn't affect what's inside. But saying a mental handicap can't is like saying a disabled person will have just as much chance in a pro sport as someone without the disability.

Regan
16th July 2008, 6:55 AM
Special kids - special schools

Normal kids - normal schools

Hakajin
16th July 2008, 7:38 AM
I believe that metally handicapped children should be in special classes because they have more needs than others. They need to move at their own pace, and it wouldn't be fair to others to pace classes around them. Also, they can often be disruptive and interfere with the learning of other children.

However, I do think special ed programs need to be improved. We need more qualified teachers, and they need better curriculums.

ImJessieTR
16th July 2008, 1:16 PM
True. But at the same time, one must consider that a mental handicap may distort someone's personality. Special needs kids can seem violent and aggressive at times: those are traits that we teach our children are bad. You can say that skin color doesn't affect what's inside. You can say that wealth doesn't affect what's inside. But saying a mental handicap can't is like saying a disabled person will have just as much chance in a pro sport as someone without the disability.

I know. However, equating someone with a mild disorder with someone with a severe disorder is not right either. I don't agree with outright mainstreaming in some bleeding-heart attempt to be "fair", but these kids will never learn how to deal with "normal" people if they don't ever get exposure. Besides, how many tantrums stem from their disorder and how many stem from the teasing the teacher isn't catching?

Sun Phoenix
16th July 2008, 10:55 PM
When I went to a public school, there were always 3-4 kids so severely handicapped they had to be in wheelchairs and couldn't talk or move much. It was disturbing to see. If I was born like that, I would want to be put out of my misery.

ironknight42
17th July 2008, 2:45 AM
"When I went to a public school, there were always 3-4 kids so severely handicapped they had to be in wheelchairs and couldn't talk or move much. It was disturbing to see. If I was born like that, I would want to be put out of my misery."
Well after these thoughts of brutality, on to my opinion. Serious need on part of the mentally handicrapped is the only reason to not have them in public schools they should at least have some exposer to their class mates. What is are definition of mentally handicaped?

Cutiebunny
17th July 2008, 2:45 AM
I think it needs to be decided on a case by case basis. There are some children who have more minor handicaps that could be sucessfully mainstreamed. But for those whos disabilites are more severe, mainstreaming them would not only be detrimental for handicapped, but also for the children around them.

Children can be mean. Seeing someone who is different is card blanche for them to make fun of them. Ask anyone who was picked on through school how hard it was for them to cope and you'll understand the severity of the issue.

ironknight42
17th July 2008, 2:54 AM
"I think it needs to be decided on a case by case basis. There are some children who have more minor handicaps that could be sucessfully mainstreamed. But for those whos disabilites are more severe, mainstreaming them would not only be detrimental for handicapped, but also for the children around them."
my thought exactly Cutiebunny good to see we agree on something seeing as our opinions of the 08 election are so different.

Strants
17th July 2008, 5:34 PM
I think it needs to be decided on a case by case basis. There are some children who have more minor handicaps that could be sucessfully mainstreamed. But for those whos disabilites are more severe, mainstreaming them would not only be detrimental for handicapped, but also for the children around them. Yes, I'll argee there. Because there is a nature difference in intelligence for each child, one could argue that everyone but the top 10% or something is 'handicapped.'

Perhaps there needs to be a cutoff point. Say, anyone with lower then a D, AND in the bottom 10% of the class with grades 30% below their classmate's average is considered mentally handicapped (or something like that.) Now, maybe those aren't the best standards, and logically there may be special cases, like the kid living in the poor neighborhood, and stuff like that. I'm more trying to say there should be standards of some sort, so that a group can more easily decide if a child is mentally handicapped.

shinygroudon232
17th July 2008, 5:56 PM
A mentally handicapped patient's severity of mental handicap can differ greatly between one patient and the next. So, I fully agree in Cutiebunny's previous statement describing how it would be best to have it be decided on a case-by-case basis. If you observe most cases of autism and thier symptoms, you will learn why they describe it as the "Spectrum Disorder". I, for one, have to siblings with autism, both of which are considered handicapped, but, they both differ greatly from each other in terms of severity of thier condition. I, my self, am border line aspergers. Many people with autism are highly intelligent, but simply cannot comunicate like the rest of us. This is why they need teachers specificaly trained to teach autistic childern. Meaning, if they were put into a mainstream classroom, most autistic children would have major problems being able to not only fit in, but learn as much as they would in special needs classes. Now, its not only autistic children that differ greatly in terms of severity of their cases. The same can be said for the mentally retarded. Thus, I believe, that ALL mentally handicapped children should be judged by a case-by-case basis whether or not they will be able to learn more in mainstream classes than in special needs classes.

ImJessieTR
17th July 2008, 9:51 PM
Now, maybe those aren't the best standards, and logically there may be special cases, like the kid living in the poor neighborhood, and stuff like that. I'm more trying to say there should be standards of some sort, so that a group can more easily decide if a child is mentally handicapped.

There are standards. It's called the DSM-IV-TR ... it's the diagnostic manual that labels their condition.

Oh, standards about school ... it's really a catch-22. If you leave the poor performers IN mainstream school ... then they're teased because they're different or "dumb". However, if you take them OUT, then you've lowered their status even more and practically painted "different or dumb" on their foreheads.

Profesco
23rd July 2008, 7:30 AM
I have some mixed feelings about this, too, but I'm pretty much against mainstreaming the disabled children. As a budding teacher, I had a little training towards considering operation of the classroom. One of the things that I was concerned most about was time. From a student's point of view (mine), I enjoy the classes where the learning moves along at a decent clip. There has to be enough time to go in-depth into the materials that need it, and enough speed to always stay with the curriculum. With schools in my country being mostly held to a standardized curriculum, classroom time is not a luxury to be wasted. Another point I was personally worried about was behavioral problems and, for lack of a better expression, troublesome students. It's intimidating already to know that you've got these students who might disrupt the class, and therefore the precious little time you get to teach the other students, but one must always consider the parents at home. Quite often, the parent of the troubled student can be just as obstinate. That means even more time and energy spent dealing with the problem. I suppose I'm too naive and inexperienced yet to make any leaping claims, though.

Anyway, back to the topic at hand. I enjoy the thought of special-needs children having entire classes dedicated solely to achieving those needs. A big part of teaching is achieving the needs of the students to the best of your ability. This often requires focus on difficulties. With the great amount of diversity already in existance in normal classrooms, different methods of teaching and activities/studies that use different styles of teaching are a must. Having extra needs to focus on really can take away from all the other students you're handling. Besides, the extra attention given to special-needs students in their own classes is invaluable to their academic growth. They need to learn at their own pace and through their own style, and that will certainly take time and effort, sometimes beyond what a normal class can afford to give. In fact, here's an example from Strants's pro-mainstreaming article:


a developmentally delayed student in fourth grade "wanted to work in the same math book on the same page as the other kids, but he didn't know how to do multiplication. So we let him add the numbers instead."

That is not achieving the point of the excercise. Obviously, this student is behind the others, and while that's far from being a bad thing in it's own right, look at what happens to the work being done. The student isn't learning what the class is, and to me, that sounds like a lack of progress. He isn't moving with the class, he's just being "let" to do something else in the meantime. If this student was in an appropriately-leveled class, with peers who are perhaps at his same level in mathematics, not only could the teacher focus on the math actually being done, but the student could be cooperating with these peers, providing some social motivation to his education. It just makes the entire learning process more enjoyable.

As was the case with the home-schooling thread, my attention is focused on the educational aspect of schooling. I think having classes that cater to students' specific needs is a fine way to maximize the learning being done. It doesn't need to have anything to do with "fitting into normal society." In fact, I rather find that forcing these labels onto the children, and then using them to force these children into classrooms where they will experience this feeling of difference to a possibly harsh degree, is misguided. Perhaps cruel.

ImJessieTR
23rd July 2008, 1:18 PM
Maybe it would be helpful to get rid of grades (not the assessment, but the level) entirely. Instead, just have classes students must sign up for, no matter what "grade" they would have been in. Our educational system wants children to be "with their age group" ... the only problem is, it's not the age but the developmental level that needs to be the cohort. School is, as far as I'm aware, the only place in the whole world where people are segregated by age. I can't think of anywhere else this happens. We're not teaching children to accept other people in other age groups. Perhaps some of this teasing and bullying problem is related to how school is set up. After all, if you are a five-year-old in a third-grade room because you're a genius, you're looked at as much of a freak as the thirteen-year-old in a class of ten-year-olds. It shouldn't be this way.

Strants
23rd July 2008, 4:56 PM
Maybe it would be helpful to get rid of grades (not the assessment, but the level) entirely. Instead, just have classes students must sign up for, no matter what "grade" they would have been in. Our educational system wants children to be "with their age group" ... the only problem is, it's not the age but the developmental level that needs to be the cohort. School is, as far as I'm aware, the only place in the whole world where people are segregated by age. I can't think of anywhere else this happens. We're not teaching children to accept other people in other age groups. Perhaps some of this teasing and bullying problem is related to how school is set up. After all, if you are a five-year-old in a third-grade room because you're a genius, you're looked at as much of a freak as the thirteen-year-old in a class of ten-year-olds. It shouldn't be this way. Hmm. . . Well, I don't know what to think.
On one hand, it's better educationally for the students. Everyone gets to learn at their own pace, which is good.
On the other hand, I don't see teasing stopping any time soon, even with this system. For example, it is generally assumed that a fourth grader is smarter than a third grader. This would only confirm that. A younger fourth grader might taunt an older third grader. Or, an older child in a class of mostly younger children might flaunt his age and size. Finally, people mature differently. Being smart doesn't mean that you are mature (although, maturity can give the impression of intelligence, I guess). I WAS the age of my peers, but I felt socially awkward throughout almost half of my elemtary school life. As a matter of fact, the year I was put in GT was the year I really started openning up socailly. Is there a connection? I can't say. Maybe they came simultaniously because of one cause. Maybe one caused the other. Maybe they just came at the same time.

Xweek
23rd July 2008, 6:32 PM
It definitely depends on the cases at hand. Of course, being one of those mentally handicapped children that this debate is on about, I would be expected to have some thought on the matter.

PsychedelicJellyfish
23rd July 2008, 6:56 PM
It depends how 'mentally handicapped' the person is. It's just not cricket to put a severely autistic person who cannot speak or understand language and is utterly incapable of interacting with others in a class full of 'normal' people.

However, in the case of Asperger's syndrome (which maybe isn't a 'mental handicap', but that's a debate for another day), a lot of 'sufferers' are fairly capable of handling regular education.

ImJessieTR
23rd July 2008, 10:47 PM
On the other hand, I don't see teasing stopping any time soon, even with this system. For example, it is generally assumed that a fourth grader is smarter than a third grader.
But, see, that's what would be different. It'd be more like college, where unless you specifically ask, it may be hard to determine what "grade" they're in. Instead of having x-grade classes, you'd just have subject classes (Computation [counting, adding, subtracting], Arithmetic [multiplication, division, etc]). By removing labels suggesting progression, it might create a more supportive atmosphere.


This would only confirm that. A younger fourth grader might taunt an older third grader. Or, an older child in a class of mostly younger children might flaunt his age and size.
It would still be a challenge. Though, I would think that with the right atmosphere, such incidents could be reduced. Children who dominate others probably experience that in their home lives. We need to give these children alternative "universes", so to speak.

deepening
24th July 2008, 5:33 AM
I think it needs to be decided on a case by case basis. There are some children who have more minor handicaps that could be sucessfully mainstreamed. But for those whos disabilites are more severe, mainstreaming them would not only be detrimental for handicapped, but also for the children around them.

Children can be mean. Seeing someone who is different is card blanche for them to make fun of them. Ask anyone who was picked on through school how hard it was for them to cope and you'll understand the severity of the issue.

Vouche, I used to be obese and was growing really slowly in puberty and act really wierd but now I got put medication for adhd that I found out I had a few years ago and it's basically medical speed, and so I'm really fit now and I'm 16 and a half and I'm taller and way broader than the people who used to make fun of me so now it's fun to **** with them. It was tougth as balls going through middle school though. Literally everyone knowing you have a nickname because of something about you, people stealing your stuff and you having to chase them down it's ****n hard and my teachers almost never did sht.

Cifala
28th July 2008, 7:50 AM
My old school was ridiculous about inclusion. They put kids who aren't even awake for more than 45 minutes in a day in classrooms. It was particularily annoying when they're screaming because they aren't getting their own way (no, not because they are in pain, we have those kids too, and they are in the special classroom where they belong) and you can't do your work.

Lone--Wanderer
28th July 2008, 8:28 AM
Reminds me of a certain kid in a Spec. Ed. program at my old middle school...he wasn't even mentally handicapped [at least, not that I could see; he could talk, walk, feed himself and preform basic tasks], just horrifically spoiled and coddled, and anybody with a brain could've seen that the program wasn't helping that at all.

Token
30th July 2008, 6:20 PM
My brother and I are both mainstreamed. I have Asperger's, and he has High functioning Autism (and epilepsy), and we aren't really treated any differently. My bro was always mainstreamed, and in his first year, the teacher explained the disability to his classmates. He has neurotypical friends, isn't bullied, and has some of the highest grades in the class.

I personally think this should be decided on a case by case basis, but I also think the OP needs to clarify what s/he means by mentally handicapped. Do kids with ADD need to be put in separate schools? What about kids with speech defects? I don't think you should just shove everyone with disabilities in a special school, but I also don't beleive that every child should be mainstreamed.

Strants
31st July 2008, 1:42 AM
I personally think this should be decided on a case by case basis, but I also think the OP needs to clarify what s/he means by mentally handicapped. Do kids with ADD need to be put in separate schools? What about kids with speech defects? I don't think you should just shove everyone with disabilities in a special school, but I also don't beleive that every child should be mainstreamed. That first sentence kind of seems contradictory, but learning disorders are the largest deal; a child that learns at a very slow pace may slow down a lot of the class. ADD, speech disorders, etc. are more case based things; if they interfere with the child or his peers learning to an extent that learning is severely slowed down, then they should be placed in a better environment, for everyone's sake.

(Also, could people stop with the examples? No offense, but they aren't taken from a large enough sample, so they aren't really debatable.)

BUG
31st July 2008, 3:10 AM
My school tried that in my 1st grade year. Kid colored his tongue purple. That was the end of that. In a nutshell, no, they're called special needs because they have special needs.

Mr. Mudkip
4th August 2008, 12:57 AM
We had a sp. Ed program at our school last year. So much learning time was wasted on annoincements and fundraisers. It bugged me. I feel compassion for sp. needs children (my age) and try to be friends with them, but it really is kind of awkward, and they always get made fun of behind their back. I think they would do better somewhere else. The sp. needs kids reallllllllllllly liked our school though. I think it wouldn't be right to take them out once they're in, but I don't think they should be in. They can't tell they're different anyways, so sending them somewhere else really wouldn't make them even wonder why.

513Tauros
13th August 2008, 1:22 PM
I don't know really what Ithink because of this one incident at the school my mom works at. It was field day and all the kids were wearing red shirts. The administration thought it was a good idea to let the handicapped kids go outside and enjoy the field day as well. All the handicapped kids were wearing LIME GREEN shirts. Yeah....

On the other side, I'm actually dating a girl with a disability. She's one where if she didn't tell you she did, you'd never guess right of the bat. She's like a normal person almost. But she went through high school like a normal person, and had help from aides and all that. Yes, she still got made fun of and nobody thought she would ever graduate, but she did and on time.

mangaeyes
14th August 2008, 10:00 AM
I have to disagree with you 100% on the first post. I really don't think you understand.

Children with learning difficulties or disabilities (handicapped=no btw) anyway these childrens problems range a lot. Take downs syndrome for example. People with downs syndrome can either be the same as someone with dyslexia or more sevre and have the mental age half of there own age. Someone with a milder disability can be put into mainstream school and be fine and not even be bottom of the class. Someone with a more sever problem would go to a special school with staff who can properly help them.

The point is they won't throw a child in at the deep end if they can't swim. They gauge there learning difficulty and if they can do well in mainstream school then why shouldn't they have a chance? People often think of disabled people as drooling sterotypes who can't do anything, well this is very wrong. They can have jobs, they can have an education and they can get married. We shouldn't exclude them from society just because we think they can't handle it.

squirrel boy
17th August 2008, 2:15 AM
most mentally slow people are smarter in a long term way than mentally fast people, so i think as they get older they should be in the real world but as children they havent had enough long term memory to know much. so im kinda pro-mainstreaming, as sad as that is.( sorry mom)

threehoboswithshaymin
13th September 2008, 2:16 AM
Anti mainstreaming, There's a special at my school who looks (and for all i know could be) 20 or 30 and he has the mental age of a 2 year old.
There's another one whojust ignores people except he chases after girls and tries to sexually assult them. Would you like them in your class??

Zero Nexus
18th September 2008, 6:41 PM
For plenty of reasons, i'm against mainstreaming. There's this girl in my year at school who's got AS and plenty of other things wrong with her (She used to actually go on here, under the name Timelady), and she doesn't fit im in the slightest. She's obsessed (And i mean, OBSESSED) with Doctor Who. I used to be friends with her, but she annoyed me and would NEVER see anyone's point of view other than her own and she was very self-centred.

She doesn't even seem to realise that i'm not her friend anymore. She's the kind of person you just REALLY want them to never come to your school again. I absolutely hate her, even talking about her here made me shudder, but this is a personnal thing. But really, none of this would be anyone's problem if she went to some 'special' school.

Wanna know why i hate her? Because she's self-centred, and because i used to hang out with her, the people who are now my friends were giving me a hard time at first because i used to hang out with her, and she was probably the school's biggest reject then.

Don't think i hate people with disabilities, that's not why i don't like her. I mean, there's a few other handicapped people in my school, one of which has down syndrome, and she's a really nice person who isn't self-centred. It's because of the reasons i already stated why i hate her. Plus, her very presence winds me up. I mean, she has llike a helper in EVERY bloody lesson, and she doesn't usually need one. Every single year she's won some sort of award, and it feels like the helpers (Who are very obnoxious) are rigging it so that she wins it. Know what else? There's this normal youth club which she goes to. I've been a couple of times, and you know what? She just sits in the corner, drawing. She can do that at home, and her being there ruins it for me when i've gone, and she NEVER talks to anybody, why go there if you aren't going to socialise? I know she's got those sort of problems, but if that's the case, why go there?

I don't hate her as much now, but it really winds me up when she goes there and i still think she would have been better off at a 'special' school.

So, yeah, i'm 101% against mainstreaming, not for people who are only slightly handicapped (Like the DS girl), but for people like her, definately.

Atoyont
18th September 2008, 7:09 PM
For plenty of reasons, i'm against mainstreaming. There's this girl in my year at school who's got AS and plenty of other things wrong with her (She used to actually go on here, under the name Timelady), and she doesn't fit im in the slightest. She's obsessed (And i mean, OBSESSED) with Doctor Who. I used to be friends with her, but she annoyed me and would NEVER see anyone's point of view other than her own and she was very self-centred.

She doesn't even seem to realise that i'm not her friend anymore. She's the kind of person you just REALLY want them to never come to your school again. I absolutely hate her, even talking about her here made me shudder, but this is a personnal thing. But really, none of this would be anyone's problem if she went to some 'special' school.

Wanna know why i hate her? Because she's self-centred, and because i used to hang out with her, the people who are now my friends were giving me a hard time at first because i used to hang out with her, and she was probably the school's biggest reject then.
I am assuming that "AS" stands for "Asperger's Syndrome." In that case, you have a bit to learn. Asperger's Syndrome isn't a mental handicap in the typical sense of the word. Most of the time, those with AS can learn and perform the educational aspect of school quite well. The main problem, so to speak, of those with AS is a difficulty with social interaction. Admittedly, my case is rather mild, so I may not be the best person to illustrate this point. However, one with AS will have difficulty fitting in to normal conversation for one reason or another. Mannerisms will be different as well. It sounds as though this girl you "hate" is simply trying to make friends, but she doesn't know how to go about the process.


Don't think i hate people with disabilities, that's not why i don't like her. I mean, there's a few other handicapped people in my school, one of which has down syndrome, and she's a really nice person who isn't self-centred. It's because of the reasons i already stated why i hate her. Plus, her very presence winds me up. I mean, she has llike a helper in EVERY bloody lesson, and she doesn't usually need one. Every single year she's won some sort of award, and it feels like the helpers (Who are very obnoxious) are rigging it so that she wins it. Know what else? There's this normal youth club which she goes to. I've been a couple of times, and you know what? She just sits in the corner, drawing. She can do that at home, and her being there ruins it for me when i've gone, and she NEVER talks to anybody, why go there if you aren't going to socialise? I know she's got those sort of problems, but if that's the case, why go there?

I don't hate her as much now, but it really winds me up when she goes there and i still think she would have been better off at a 'special' school.

So, yeah, i'm 101% against mainstreaming, not for people who are only slightly handicapped (Like the DS girl), but for people like her, definately.
I agree that most AS "sufferers" shouldn't need an assistant in class. As I said before, learning abilities are very rarely changed. However, it sound to me as though the girl has been pampered, to a degree, by her parents. This is a major problem for those with disabilities. A person may be seen as different and, therefore, will be treated as one who needs special care. Normally, this treatment is not needed, but perhaps a little bit of coaching, instead.

As for the question at hand, it really depends on the "handicap" itself. Most handicaps that need to be addressed will be made apparent in the first few years of life, and parents or legal guardians should act accordingly.
All children need some form of interaction with peers. Unfortunately, it is often difficult for students of any age to react completely accepting of those who are different. Even many adults have this problem.
Those who are genuinely handicapped to the point where they can not learn in the same manner as their peers should certainly be taken out of class for special attention. Not pampering, but to learn in a way that they can actually receive the information at hand. My mother works as an assistant for such students. However, these are not taken out of the class, and their standardized test scores are assimilated into the whole of the school, thus lowering their average. I accept that leaders don't want handicapped students left out of opportunities, but it should be done in a way that they can achieve the best result and feel the best that they can.

porygonfan
18th September 2008, 9:04 PM
I have ADHD which is a learning disability (call it a mental handicap if you want)
I guess mine isn't that bad, because I was in a regular school my whole life, but I did have to take special classes for some subjects and school was a struggle not only learning but also in social situations, also affected by my ADHD that made it hard for me to fit in or act "normal" I was happy though I didnt have to take a foreign language and got extended time on tests. :)

My cousin has the same thing, but he is worse since he has violent rages if you got him mad and he is lucky he can sit down and do work for 10 minutes, he went to a special school and ended up graduating 3 years after me and we are the same age.

So I guess they have these different schools for a reason. But, I dont see why they couldnt convert some rooms in a regular school for severely handicapped people only (like autism or blindness) My only idea is the parents are worried about other kids picking on them or tormenting them because the dont understand or are jsut plain cruel to others.

Strants
20th September 2008, 12:51 AM
For plenty of reasons, i'm against mainstreaming. There's this girl in my year at school who's got AS and plenty of other things wrong with her (She used to actually go on here, under the name Timelady), and she doesn't fit im in the slightest. She's obsessed (And i mean, OBSESSED) with Doctor Who. I used to be friends with her, but she annoyed me and would NEVER see anyone's point of view other than her own and she was very self-centred.

She doesn't even seem to realise that i'm not her friend anymore. She's the kind of person you just REALLY want them to never come to your school again. I absolutely hate her, even talking about her here made me shudder, but this is a personnal thing. But really, none of this would be anyone's problem if she went to some 'special' school.

Wanna know why i hate her? Because she's self-centred, and because i used to hang out with her, the people who are now my friends were giving me a hard time at first because i used to hang out with her, and she was probably the school's biggest reject then. Well, I'm not sure if I totally agree with you. I mean, if she's just annoying you before and after classes, I really don't see what the big deal is. If she's disturbing the class, however, that is a different story all together. Overall, though, being 'self centered' and annoying alone is hardly a reason for a separate school.

So I guess they have these different schools for a reason. But, I dont see why they couldnt convert some rooms in a regular school for severely handicapped people only (like autism or blindness) My only idea is the parents are worried about other kids picking on them or tormenting them because the dont understand or are jsut plain cruel to others.
It takes more teachers, for one thing. Why hire one or two specially trained teachers per school for a very small minority of children? Just building one smaller special school for district seems like it would suffice (but then, I can't claim to be an expert).

May's brother
30th September 2008, 3:36 AM
Im against mainstreaming. I have a little brother who has Down Syndrome. He goes to a special school and I am happy for him.
He is in 2nd grade now yet he is still learning how to count to ten or to arrange his ABCs. For another thing, he can't talk.

If he was at a regular school I don't think he would manage and he wouldn't get the help he needs. At this school they go on excursions every Wednesday and he gets to go swimming every Monday. He is in a class of 9 and they have 4 teachers.

I think that He is learning at his own pace and I am proud to say that he is getting a very good education. If anything, going to a regular school with 'regular' children could only be bad for him.