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klducks
5th December 2005, 11:12 PM
http://www.wizards.com/global/images/magic/mirage/amber_prison.jpghttp://www.wizards.com/global/images/magic/6e/amber_prison.jpg
Amber Prison - Mirage, 6th Edition. Rare
4: Artifact
You may choose not to untap Amber Prison during your untap phase.
4,T: Tap target artifact, creature, or land. As long as Amber Prison remains tapped, that permanent does not untap during its controller's untap phase.



1 word. Overcosted. It costs 8 mana total to tap a permanent. Yeah. Granted, it has the ability to tap a land, which could be very fun if your opponent is mana screwed. It limited, it should be great, if your opponent only has 1 mana of the certain color he needs. It's pretty fun in limited since high mana cost cards that are mostly colorless dont really hurt you. It that case, sure, you can draft this in limited (6th edition drafts? =S) but otherwise... too overcosted.

The Duck's Rating: 1.5/5

Sergay Wang
5th December 2005, 11:32 PM
Useless. Utterly useless.

I've never played this card, but just at looking at the ability and costs, it's fairly useless. There are dozens of better cards that can do similar effects more efficiently.

This is just a bad remakeof Icy Manipulator, which in it's own right was decent until they revamped the rules. Back then you could tap an attacking creature to stop their attack. Now you need to tap them before they're declared as attackers =x.

In my experience, destroying lands tends to be the best way to screw over a mana base and the other option is Mana Short, which emptied mana pools.

OVERALL: 1/5

~RaikouRider243~
6th December 2005, 12:02 AM
I don't see a reason to put this in your deck. For 4 mana, I'd rather have Nullmage Shepherd with tons of 1/1s in play. And it destroys the pesky card that is bugging you, not temporarily puts it out of play. Plus, Shepherd's a 2/4. There are much more effective ways to deal with a pesky permanent than this.

1/5

Sergay Wang
6th December 2005, 12:12 AM
What if the permanent isn't an Enchantment or Artifact?

What if it's a land or creature? What if it's indesctructible?

klducks
6th December 2005, 12:16 AM
Back then you could tap an attacking creature to stop their attack. Now you need to tap them before they're declared as attackers =x.
lol, yeah that new added rule made me laugh. It really doesn't matter IMO since you'll still tap your opponents creature when they attack in casual. And even in tournament play, i guess it wouldn't hurt just to declare it during the draw phase unless you're playing a person who runs cards with haste. I guess thats the point of the rule, to utilize haste =\

Shadow Trainer
6th December 2005, 1:08 AM
I'm going to chime in with everyone else and say this card isn't really that great, it just costs to much to be useful. 1/5

Sergay Wang
6th December 2005, 1:47 AM
lol, yeah that new added rule made me laugh. It really doesn't matter IMO since you'll still tap your opponents creature when they attack in casual. And even in tournament play, i guess it wouldn't hurt just to declare it during the draw phase unless you're playing a person who runs cards with haste. I guess thats the point of the rule, to utilize haste =\
Actually, no.

As rules of combat goes, Combat Phase is seperated into many more phases.

Beginning of Combat- This is when you get to tap potential attackers before they attack or cast certain pre-combat instants (like Master Warcraft). In a tournament, your opponent will usually declare this, otherwise you have the right to tell them to go back to this phase.
Declare Attackers- When the player chooses who attacks. After they finish declaring this, you may cast spells like Devouring Light on their attacking creatures.
Declare Blockers- When blockers are chosen. After blocks are declared and before damage is dealt, you may use activated abilities that require tapping. i.e. Tidewater Minion's ability to untap permanents.
First Strike Damage- First Strike and Double Strike creatures deal damage this phase.
Combat Damage- Double Strike and non-First Strike creatures deal damage.
End of Combat- Combat is declared as over and done.

So regardless of haste, you can still tap down creatures before they're tapped and attacking. If not, you're not taking full advantageof the rules of combat... or misintepretting them. The reason they editted the rule was because it meant you could tap down after they've been declared attackers. But with the rule revamp, it means you have to guess who will be attacking and decide whether or not to tap it. You might end up tapping something that was never planning to attack. Or you might tap something and your opponent will change who he/she will attack with.

klducks
6th December 2005, 2:02 AM
ahh, forgot about the beginning of combat phase.

The reason they editted the rule was because it meant you could tap down after they've been declared attackers. But with the rule revamp, it means you have to guess who will be attacking and decide whether or not to tap it. You might end up tapping something that was never planning to attack. Or you might tap something and your opponent will change who he/she will attack with.
Meh, all the situations I've been in with cards like Icy Manipulator, Leonin Bola, etc. it doesn't really matter situation wise since they either
a) wouldn't have attacked anyways
b) it doesn't matter who i tapped, they would have still attacked so you tap the strongest or most threatful creature

And my point still goes across about tapping your opponents creature when they declare attackers in casual since you dont actually say "i declare beginning combat phase" *tap* "it is now declare attackers step"

Sergay Wang
6th December 2005, 5:48 AM
And my point still goes across about tapping your opponents creature when they declare attackers in casual since you dont actually say "i declare beginning combat phase" *tap* "it is now declare attackers step"

Well, it's good to get into the habit of doing it. I almost always declare my upkeep, my combat phase, and my end of turn phase. Obviously I skip combat if there are no creatures on the table, but I still declare if it I do have creatures that don't plan to attack. Mainly because these are the phases when your opponent will most likely have a response. If there are combat tricks, usually the player with tricks will ask you to pass priority to them before combat damage. Obviously, you cannot deny them priority, that'd be cheating.
i.e. Casting Timestop or Early Frost on people's upkeeps. Casting Master Warcraft at the beginning of combat. Casting Giant Growth before combat damage. Casting Boomerang during end of turn phase. etc.

klducks
6th December 2005, 10:52 PM
Well, it's good to get into the habit of doing it. I almost always declare my upkeep, my combat phase, and my end of turn phase.
Well, the upkeep step is easy since either
a) nothing will happen (you could play abilities but the mainphase is right after so ther really is no point)
b) something irregular happens and it's noticable to play spells then.

Casting Giant Growth before combat damage.
Yeh, I never got that rule. As it says here

309.1. As the declare blockers step begins, the defending player declares blockers (this game action doesn’t use the stack). Then any abilities that triggered on blockers being declared go on the stack. (See rule 410, “Handling Triggered Abilities.”) Then the active player gets priority and players may play spells and abilities.
Apparently, everybody thinks you can play Giant Growth when you're attacking during the Declare Blockers Step, but I wasn't sure about it cuz of the "active player" part.

But you're still able to play Giant Growth before combat damage if i read it correctly.

but yeah, it does really get annoying when your opponent goes

*block* *put creature in graveyard*
*block* *put creature in graveyard*
*block* *put creature in graveyard*

It's really annoying when you want to play a spell like Giant Growth or Boomerang, etc

Sergay Wang
7th December 2005, 12:03 AM
If you were attacking and wanted to cast Giant Growth/Predator Strike, you would need to do this before damage if you wanted the creature to deal +3 damage.

Technically, it doesn't matter whether you cast it on the Declare Attacks or Declare Blocks phase, as long as it's before Combat Damage phase. But, the active player has the first chance to cast spells, which will be explained later on. After that, the non-active player is given a chance to cast spells in response.

Ignoring any triggered abilities involving blocks, that rule simply states that the active player (the attacker) is given an oppotunity to cast spells before anything else happens. As in, he is given the first chance to cast Giant Growth on his own creature or activate some kind of ability like Sparksmith's shooting ability or whatever else he may see fit to do. These abilities are now put on the Stack (as in, they haven't finished resolving yet). Now he/she passes priority to the next player (defending player), who then is given the opportunity to respond to his spell/ability with his spells/abilities. Then passes priority back to the original player. This repeats until neither player has any spells or abilities to put on the stack.

Then all things on the stack resolve- last played things resolve first.

Example:
*It is your Combat Phase- You declared Grizzly Bears as attacking me.
*I declare Glory Seeker as Grizzly Bear's blocker.
-You have first priority- You cast Giant Growth targetting Grizzly Bears.
--Priority is passed to me- I cast Shock targetting Grizzly Bears.
---You have priority again- You have no spells to cast.
---You pass prority to me- I have no spells to cast.
(Last Played Spells/Abilities Resolve First)
--Shock resolves, dealing 2 damage to Grizzly Bears. Grizzly Bears is sent to the graveyard.
-Giant Growth tries to resolve. The target is invalid, the spell is countered.

(A common newbie mistake:)
-You cast Giant Growth on Bears. Pass priority.
--I pass priority.
--You pass priority.
-Giant Growth resolves. Grizzly Bears become 5/5.
*You pass priority
-I cast Shock. Pass.
--Pass.
-Shock resolves. 2 damage is dealt to Grizzly Bears.
*You pass priority.
-I cast Lightning Bolt. Pass.
--You pass.
-Lightning Bolt resolves, 5 damage is on Grizzly Bears and it dies.

See the difference? Because I responded to Growth, I was able to take down the bears with 1 Shock. If I allow Growth to resolve, I need to cast additional spells to deal with the creature.

Another example that did actually happen to me:
*I own 5 1/1 Saproling Tokens.
*It is my opponent's main phase (doesn't matter which one).
-Priority starts with him- He casts Pyroclasm.
--Priority is given to me now- I cast Echoing Courage on one of my Saproling Tokens.
---Priority is given to him now- He casts Shock on the Saproling I targetted with Echoing Courage.
----Priority is given to me again- I have no spells to cast.
----Priority is given to him again- He has no spells to cast.
---Shock was the last played spell, so it resolves first. My 1/1 token takes 2 damage. It dies and goes to the Graveyard.
--Echoing Courage tries to resolve. The target was invalid and the spell is countered.
-Pyroclasm resolves. 2 damage is dealt to the rest of the tokens and they die.

Priority and the Stack aren't easy things to learn for most people. It takes time to learn them, but when you understand them, the game is essentially made better. If anyone has questions about the stack, just PM me.

chaoslord
7th December 2005, 1:41 AM
A stack explaining inside a COTD...never thought I'd see that.

Anyways, this card isnt that bad...if your playing a crazy deck using Urzatron and something like Obliterate in casual.

Other than that..umm...

1/5, as everyone seems to give it.

Just as an aside to the stack thing: at least the pre-6th edition rules are gone, eh? Thank you, no-longer-a-card-type-interrupt.

klducks
7th December 2005, 4:22 AM
Priority and the Stack aren't easy things to learn for most people. It takes time to learn them, but when you understand them, the game is essentially made better. If anyone has questions about the stack, just PM me.
The stack is pretty easy to learn. There was an article about this on the main website IIRC. It had drawing about it and showed cards on top of eachother (the ones played recently are on top) and whichever cards are on top are used first then the next and etc. If it has an illegal target, it does nothing.

What you really need to know is what actually uses the stack.

Combat Damage, Instants, Sorceries, Other Spells, Abilities (besides mana abilities) off the top of my head.