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Thread: Sprite Tutorials ~ 56K Warning!

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    Arrow Sprite Tutorials ~ 56K Warning!

    This sticky is to avoid the more stickies being made. All of the current stickied sprite tutorials will be found posted in here. Your work will be creditted dont worry ;x.

    PM a Fan Sprites Mod to submit your tutorial.

    Advanced Spriting Tutorial - by Delta Suicune

    Alrighty, well since a few people were asking me for more technical tips on spriting, I'm just going to post this up for you people. Just to let you know, I'm more the person to let people learn their own methods of spriting via experience and practice, so this is kind of an exception... This is going to be my last spriting activity here at SPP so consider this a legacy if you like.

    Now, before you complain, I've said this is an advanced spriting tutorial, so don't come b!tching at me if you don't understand parts of it, this is for people who already have the spriting basics down pat and want to improve their skills to the next level. Read other tutorials for basic stuff, this is for the intermediate+ skill level people. Experience and practice are my trademark words, so get used to it, there's no quick and dirty shortcut to getting better at spriting.

    Remember, this is just my tutorial, and therefore my main method of making sprites, any of the steps or techniques may differ from person to person, so this is NOT a spriting gospel ok?

    --------------------------
    Making Sprites from Scratch

    Anyway, without further ado, how to make sprites from dirt scratch:



    1)Outline
    Simple, just take a black pencil tool and go make your outline. It doesn't have to be too perfected at this step, you just want to have most of the proportions and shapes done in this step. It's essential that you have a mental image of what you want it to look like, since editing it later is a real pain if you find out that it doesn't look the way you want it to. Just get the shape concept down, and then you're fine.

    2)Base Color Fill
    Take your paint bucket or flood tool, and get the colors you want in the places. May sound simple, but make sure the colors are properly selected, in sprites, you want to avoid the extremes of any of the palettes (white and black are about the only exceptions to this). For example, if you want a red color, don't use the pure red hue of #FF0000 [see 2b], but rather something more soft like #E01919 [see 2a] (I've used #A14649 in the final sprite btw, it's a really rusty looking red color), it really pays off in the long run since pure colors just look unnatural to the eye (also made the hair orange color stronger in 2b, compare it). Don't worry about shades yet, just get the colors in, it helps for the next step.

    3)Outline Editing
    This is probably the most vital step since it's the fine tuning of the sprite's final shape. Yes, it's only in the third step, but it's deciding the sprite's final shape already. This is the step that people have the most trouble with since it's the nitpicky one that single-handedly decides how the complete sprite will look; mediocre or professional. I don't have anything special to say since this is completely up to your eye to judge how the sprite "should" look, it's the experience that pays here.

    4)Hue Shades
    Now you can begin adding in more shading and depth to the sprite. Easiest way is to just go pick colors that are lighter and darker than your base fill color from step 2, and color away on your sprite. The vital factor here is that you color only where the sprite ought to be colored! If you make one side lighter, then make the entire sprite coherent to augment this light source. Same deal for the shading. Now, on some sprites, you need to take another step to make them more realistic, for example is metallic surfaces; you need to add one more color of lightness to bring out the "shine" of the metal.

    5)Touch Ups
    Tinkering time! Zoom out from all your editing, and take a look at your sprite progress so far. It might even be a good idea to shut down the computer and come back to look at it the next day (which is a good idea regardless actually). Like previously, only experience will tell you what needs to be fixed on your sprite now, but I'll point out what I can.

    Flesh is a rather picky one, and although this isn't the best example for that, I'll point out a few things on the face that are a good start for testing your ability to update sprites. Notice from the sprite in 4a how the shading has made the face a lot more realistic. The thing you want to highlight are usually flesh covered by or overshadowed by hair, eyebrows, nose, chin, or wrinkles. With the hair, you just want to add another color to show the darker tones and bring out the depth.

    The main thing you want to do now is basically make the overall sprite more polished. Add details, make the outlines smoother, the shading more functionally realistic, and so on. The rest is up to you and your individual sprite, there is no global formula for this.

    6)Style Comparison
    Something that you may have heard before is sprite "style", and here's a technical rundown on it. It's fundamentally about color usage, and a large part of this is how the outlining is done. In pokemon sprites, black is used on the lower right portions to accomodate the top left light source. In other games, notice that there isn't this outline. It's due to the lack of a definitive light source, and globally in commercial game sprites, the light source is taken to be straight above the character.

    I've gone and done a version here where the outlines are more absent than the pokemon style in which step 5 is done in, compare them and note the soft tone the sprite has.

    Games like Zoids Saga use completely black outlines all around the sprite regardless of light sources[see 6a], and this is effective when the sprites are small, and need clear definition. When the sprites are larger and aren't as strenuous on the eyes, there isn't an outline at all, like Golden Sun for example [see 6b]. The main difference here is obviously the factor of clarity. 6a was done from scratch using pencil tools, 6b was done using rendering and shrinkage from a larger image, hence the variation and blending of colors.

    --------------------------
    Lighting and Shading Tweaks

    For those of you wanting to improve on your shading and detailing techniques, this is the section for you. It does elaborate more on the first part of the tutorial since I've really skimmed the editing steps above, so if you need a rundown, here you are. This is essentially expanding on step 4 of the above.
    Courtesy of Susan_Rocket, I'm going to fix up the suicune sprite she made, to show how you can edit up your sprites to make them look more realistic. (I've edited a few things up before we start from hers just in case you're wondering).



    1)Identify your Light Source
    Pick a light source, and imagine light from that source shining on your sprite. What parts of your sprite will become highlighted, and what parts will become darkened? This is what you need to focus on.

    2)Add the Light and Shadows
    As with reality, when there's light shining on something, a shadow is going to be cast, both externally as a black shape on the ground or surrounding terrain, and internally on the object itself. External shadows aren't in the pokemon games, so I'll ignore them for this tutorial, but in other sprite games or styles, note that you will need to add those.

    To compare the results of adding light and shadows, a light source from the top left [see 2a], a light source from the top right [see 2b], and a generic unclear light source [see 2c]. I've added some darker outlines to help simulate the black outlines that are normally in the pokemon sprites.

    For the generic light source, note how the light and dark regions are spaced out to make it appear as if the light source is where your eyes are; all the regions are centered as if to bring out the realism straight towards your eyes, not in any lateral direction on the screen (note that this style is NEVER used in pokemon style sprites, so it's probably not applicable for most of you, but for those experimenting with other styles, it's trivial knowledge).

    There isn't much else to say, you need to be able to judge where the light/shadow changes fall on your individual sprite. For those of you who havn't taken art or art related courses, this could be a bit more of a challenge. Go pick up any book at the library regarding lighting if you're really lost.

    --------------------------

    Once you've got all this stuff down pat, you can make stuff like this:

    Have fun people!
    (and that's as close of a picture as you're ever going to get of me so get lost)

    All content and images in this tutorial are copyrighted by DeltaSuicune, and may not be reproduced in any other medium without permission of the creator. In other words, don't claim any parts of this tutorial as your own, or post it up elsewhere without permission.

    ~DS

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    Spriting Tutorial - by Shimitaro

    Credit:
    Thanks to ImageShack for Free Image Hosting.
    Take note:
    1. The tutorial font is small. Bring your reading glasses if you are far-sided.
    2. To enlarge the picture, click on it once.

    Sprite Tutorial:
    Steps one and two, plus how Paint's tool bar works.
    Steps three, four, five, and six.
    Finishing touches.
    Last edited by MS; 13th November 2005 at 10:21 PM.

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    Default

    Region Making Tutorial - by Wacko Jacko

    I have waited politely for Bio to make one for about two months.
    But I have had enough waiting and by the looks of it, he ain't making it.
    I'll just get the pics.

    New Region Kit
    Old Region Kit
    Both Kits are equally good. The new one just looks a little different in the end.

    Step: 1
    Step 1: Using the sea tool, make the largness of the area you want your region to fit in. Then out line the egde of the region with the darkest of the region colours. Then you just fill in the region with the colour you outlined with. (Darkest of the greens)

    Step: 2
    Step 2: Now once you've filled in with colour, shade with the other greens, but remember, the lighter the colour, the smaller shaded. And always shade on top of the one darker colour.

    Step: 3
    Step 3: It's tme to add the routes! Before you do though, make the route always stays the same width. (If you are using the old kit, best to copy the width off the example region). And thats not all! You can also add the surf and dive paths! (Optional) Again most of it, is all the same width. Apart from te big patches you might like to add.

    Step: 4
    Step 4: Almost done! (This is my most hated and most boring step) Time to shade the routes! (Not the water ones) If you look closely on each kit, there is a route shade next to the region shade. Wherever the route shade went over the region shade, shade it back in with the route shade that's next to the region shade you went over with!

    Step: 5
    Step 5: This is the easiest step! Simply add the towns, citys, ???s, dungeons and caves!

    Please, if you are having any trouble on making a region, dont be afraid to PM me!
    Last edited by MS; 26th July 2005 at 3:08 AM.

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    Facial Sprite Tutorial - by Susan Rocket



    and the final result:



    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    This thread will be closed in order to stop any posting other than tutorials. Just send me a PM if you want a tutorial posted and if you need help concerning one of the tutorials posted; PM the tutorial maker or contact them in some sort of way.

    *closes*

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    Default Transparency Tutorial! (For Photoshop and Animation Shop) - by Snagger Outlaw

    Transparency Tutorial! (For Photoshop and Animation Shop) - by Snagger Outlaw

    FOR PHOTOSHOP

    1. Select the fill tool.
    2. Go to the dropdown menu shown in the screenshot and select "Clear"
    3. Fill in the places you want transparent and it will be transparent.

    **This was done in Photoshop Elements**


    ANIMATION SHOP

    1. Select fill tool. Tick the box that says "Canvas color" or something like that. If it's not availible, fill it with a color not in your pic, undo, then tick it.
    2. Fill where you want transparent
    3. Save

    **This was done in Animation Shop 3**

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    Default Transparency Tutorial - by Poochyena

    Transparency Tutorial - by Poochyena

    This is for Paint Shop Pro 9:
    Image 1
    Image 2
    Image 3
    Image 4
    Image 5

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    Default Map Tutorial - by theultimatebulk

    Map Tutorial - By theultimatebulk

    TUTORIAL PART 1
    TUTORIAL PART 2

    Also, the template used fits the World Map Template so there is no need for people to have to recolour maps.

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    Default Simple Pixel Shading Tutorial - by Renagadez

    Simple Pixel Shading Tutorial - by Renagadez


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    Default Sonic Recoloring - by Butchimatic

    Sonic Recoloring - by Butchimatic


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    Default Revamping Tutorial - by L.I.E

    Revamping Tutorial - by L.I.E


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    Default Scratch Sprite Tutorial - by Zelionax

    Scratch Sprite Tutorial - by Zelionax


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    Default Pokemon Egg Tutorial - by Chaos Emerald

    Pokemon Egg Tutorial - by Chaos Emerald


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    Default Battle Scene Tutorial - by deefunx

    Battle Scene Tutorial - by deefunx









    Backgrounds :

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    Default How to make Overworld Sprites - by Silver Fusion

    How to make Overworld Sprites - by Silver Fusion


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    Default iPod Pokemon - by Deoxytwo

    iPod Pokemon - by Deoxytwo


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    Default Trainer Card Tutorial - by MS

    Trainer Card Tutorial - by MS D:

    Tutorial :



    Use this for the FR/LG Scenes :


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    Default Revamp Tutorial - by ForeverDes

    Revamp Tutorial - by ForeverDes

    [IMG]http://*******.com/hsjcjo.png[/IMG]

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    Default

    Revamp Tutorial - by Shinyflygon


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    Default Emotion Making Tutorial - by Team Aqua member SWIM

    Emotion Making Tutorial - by Team Aqua member SWIM


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    Default A Beginner's Tutorial to Custom Parts - by Ilex

    A Beginner's Tutorial to Custom Parts - by Ilex

    Okay, so I have decided to make a tutorial on basic custom parts. I will be explaining a strategy I used to use when making custom parts.

    So say you wanted to make a mutation of two Pokemon, but a certain part looks ridiculous if you just copy-and-pasted the part. If I would've done that on Slowstantbre, my sprite's horns would've looked reatrded.()

    So the first thing you do is take the part you want to replace and make a grid around it

    You then grab the secondary Pokemon's part and make a grid around them aswell.

    Erase everything but the grid on from the base Pokemon (Slowking's horn in my situation) and you should be left with something like this:

    Everything from now on is pretty straight forward. You start making a smaller version of the larger part.

    Please note that the smaller part is going to be slightly distorted.

    After you complete the grid you should probally have something like this.


    Get rid of the grid and connect the squares (You should be able to do this) and there you have it! A custom part for your mutations!


    ~Ilex

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    Default Revamping Tutorial - by castiboy

    Revamping Tutorial - by castiboy


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    Default Fossil Pokemon Tutorial - by D-Man

    Fossil Pokemon Tutorial - by D-Man

    Last edited by Zephyr Flare; 8th November 2006 at 10:47 PM.

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    Default Devamp Tutorial - by Mega Trickster

    Devamp Tutorial - by Mega Trickster


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    Default Animating with GIMP - by ChaosEmerald

    Animating with The GIMP~ - by ChaosEmerald



    The GIMP is a very popular graphics program, rivaling Photoshop and Paint Shop Pro. Did you know you can also use it to animate your sprites? Well, I'm here to show you how.

    [IMG]http://i4.*******.com/15f59g6.png[/IMG][IMG]http://i5.*******.com/15fgm13.png[/IMG][IMG]http://i4.*******.com/15fgm7c.png[/IMG]

    First, have all the frames you are going to use saved as seperate images like I have here. Open The GIMP and open up your first frame.

    [IMG]http://i3.*******.com/15fhf2c.png[/IMG]

    You can skip this step if all your frames are the same size, or if your first frame is the largest in both length and width. If not, then pay attention!

    Click on the Layer tab at the top of the screen, then go down a bit and click "Layer to boundary size." Then, click the chain link to make it broken, as shown in the picture. Then, make the length and width bigger until you get the size of your largest image. Now, remember if your largest image lengthwise is 70x55 and your largest image heightwise is 40x65, then all of your frames will need to be 70x65 so all images fit.

    [IMG]http://i5.*******.com/15fhk78.png[/IMG]

    Now for the transperizing.Click the Layer tab at the top. Then, go down to Transparency. From the list that appears, click "Add to Alpha Channel." Now, go back to the GIMP tools select, and select the tool shown in the picture. Make sure the Threshold is set to 0 (which it is not in the picture, and I had to fix than. n_n). Now, click on a piece of white that you want to be transparent. Hold the mouse button down and drag it off to the side somewhere (not on the image). Repeat for each spot you want to become transparent. Note: You may want to zoom in for this part if there are small areas of white. If so, click View at the top. Then click "Zoom (100%)" and select about 4:1.

    [IMG]http://i3.*******.com/15fhulg.png[/IMG]

    Now you're going to add the rest of your animation layers. Go to Open As Layer (pointing to in the picture). Find your next animation frame and open it. You will need to transperize it, so repeat the previous step on this layer.



    Repeat the previous step for each frame you have. Don't worry about the fact that you can see the layers below each layer. It will not end up like that in the end. Also make sure the layer is anchored before adding a new frame. To anchor the layer, simply click on a place that isn't the image. To make sure you didn't mess up on your layers, click Ctrl + L to open the layer tab. You can then view all your layers individually.


    [IMG]http://i3.*******.com/15fiwbn.png[/IMG]


    Once you are done adding frames and have them all there, in the order you want, it's time to save. Click File, then go to Save As. Then click the plus sign circled in the picture to bring down the different file types. Select GIF image from the list. A notice should come up saying GIF can only handle layers as an animation. Click thw white circle next to "Save as Animation." Then click the Export button. On the next page, be sure to put under "Frame disposal where unspecified," change it to "One frame per layer." For the Delay frames where unspecified part, I made it 200. If it seems too fast or too slow, you can re-save the image later and change that to a bigger number (for slower) or smaller number (for faster).



    Well, now all you need to do is upload your image to an image hoster. I hope this tutorial helped you realize how versatile The GIMP is as a graphics program, and helped you learn how to do more things with it. This is my result for the image, btw, in case you wanted to see how fast 200 miliseconds was:


    [IMG]http://i5.*******.com/15fj2xf.gif[/IMG]


    Tutorial ©Chaos Emerald/Lucky Chansey 2006. Vaporeon ©Nintendo 1996-2006. Tutorial may be used on your website, in part or in whole, as long as credit is given either at the end or beginningof the tutorial. If you have any questions, you may pm me. (Chaos Emerald).

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